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Improving my SOloing

Discussion in 'Ask Steve Lawson & Michael Manring' started by Tyler Kelly, Oct 17, 2002.


  1. Tyler Kelly

    Tyler Kelly

    Sep 1, 2002
    Santa Rosa
    My bass solo's pretty much consist of me staying in one position, and I was wondering if anyone could recomend someway for me to start creating more complex solos (I've been trying to just use the same notes but in different positions)
    Also, most of my solos tend to gravitate towards a funk feel, and I was wondering if anyone could help me think of way to get a darker sound to them (Right now, they sound more like Primus, I'm looking for a Tool or Mudvayne feel).
    Sorry if these sound a bit open ended, but the best I could do :(

    Thanks
    Tyler
     
  2. wulf

    wulf

    Apr 11, 2002
    Oxford, UK
    Listen carefully to what other musicians do with their solos, especially in the musical genres you want to draw from. Don't worry about trying to cop X's bass solo or Y's sax solo note for note - just work on expanding your thinking and giving your fingers the skills to keep up with your new ideas.

    Wulf
     
  3. chris griffiths

    chris griffiths

    Aug 20, 2002
    nashville tn
    Endorsing artist: Gallien Krueger
    3 note sequences help a ton for me. like if you take a G blues scale and go right up the neck G Bb C, Bb C Db, C Db D, Db D F, D F G, and right up until your out of notes and then back down again or do it inverted C Bb G, Db C Bb, will give some new ideas on fingering and where the notes are higher up and how to get there. Pick your favorite scales and play them like that one end of the neck to the other that will teach you about the neck improve your dexterity to. This is especially good if you play more then 4 strings

    other then that a cool hat always helps
     
  4. Tyler Kelly

    Tyler Kelly

    Sep 1, 2002
    Santa Rosa
    Thanks for the advice guys.
     
  5. Chip

    Chip

    May 2, 2000
    i think an important point is when soloing dont think of what solos you know so can can transpose them, or what patterns your favorite bands use in their solos
    learn scales and develop your own feel, you may wanna choose a good song and solo over it trying not to immitate most of the song
     
  6. b0nes83

    b0nes83

    Dec 14, 2000
    really learn the scales so you dont really need to think about it much and your fingers know where to go...peace
    Chad
     
  7. bplayerofdoom

    bplayerofdoom

    Aug 6, 2002
    R.S.M.
    o. dont worry if your hand doesnt ever move if it dont have to but if you throw in some slides or some other effects like such you may find it nessary to move your hand.
     
  8. bplayerofdoom

    bplayerofdoom

    Aug 6, 2002
    R.S.M.
    O and im not sure but i dont think its possible to play a pentatonic(is that how you say it) scale or some of the modes in 1 position.
     
  9. chris griffiths

    chris griffiths

    Aug 20, 2002
    nashville tn
    Endorsing artist: Gallien Krueger
    nope it's not I think you'll have to move at least once. another good exercise for soloing is taking a bunch of keys and writing them down in a list and ever 4 measures changes keys without changing position. so if your in second position dont run up to the fifth fret with your first finger just make the adjustments you need to make in that position. that will get the keys in your head better and it will help you finding new scalular options
     
  10. Howard K

    Howard K

    Feb 14, 2002
    UK
    bass is all about groove. the absolute simplest things can work as a solo.

    Dont get too bogged down with trying to make it flashy or clever.
    I find quite often a bass break in a song has the function of giving a short pause to lead into the next part of the song. Many many bands use bass breaks in this way, it works!

    Oh and regarding hand position - surley you can play notes from any mode in any key in one hand position?
     
  11. wulf

    wulf

    Apr 11, 2002
    Oxford, UK
    Regarding scales and moving you can definitely play them in on position. For example, a major pentatonic scale over one octave (1-2-3-5-6-8) can be played, one finger per fret style:

    2 - 4 (change to next string)
    1 - 4 (change to next string)
    1 - 4

    However, there are good reasons for learning them along the neck (shifting) as well as staying in one position - for example, to play the scale over multiple octaves or to use parts of the scale getting from one part of the neck to another.

    I think Howard's advice is good - it can also help to record yourself practising and at rehearsals. Often you'll hear something coming out of your fingers which sounds effective but which you hardly even noticed at the time. They might be simple, but if you can understand what you did and why it worked, you'll certainly be improving your foundation for building worthwhile solos... and you know that all that source material is within your reach because it was you who played it in first place :D

    Wulf