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Individual string bridge

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by heavyfunkmachin, Jun 10, 2011.


  1. heavyfunkmachin

    heavyfunkmachin

    Jan 21, 2005
  2. grisezd

    grisezd

    Oct 14, 2009
    Ohio
    Wow, I've never thought of that. You could just ground one bridge element but then unless you have a metal nut you'd only ground one string! I suppose you could drill 4 (or whatever) ground wire holes and ground each individually, or run a strip of copper tape under each and ground one, or use a brass nut?

    Now I'm curious. What is commonly done?
     
  3. heavyfunkmachin

    heavyfunkmachin

    Jan 21, 2005
    if the body was painted I could try to paint the metal thingy.... but its natural!
     
  4. mikeyswood

    mikeyswood Banned

    Jul 22, 2007
    Cincinnati OH
    Luthier of Michael Wayne Instruments
    It's easy to have the four grounding wires, but it is also easier (IMO) to use shielded electronics.
     
  5. heavyfunkmachin

    heavyfunkmachin

    Jan 21, 2005
    I use shielded electronics... but i still want to ground the bridge/strings.

    What's wrong with that?
     
  6. mikeyswood

    mikeyswood Banned

    Jul 22, 2007
    Cincinnati OH
    Luthier of Michael Wayne Instruments
    If you are using shielded pickups then you do not need the bridge ground.
     
  7. scojack

    scojack

    Apr 1, 2009
    Scotland
    Put a brass nut on and ground one ?
     
  8. heavyfunkmachin

    heavyfunkmachin

    Jan 21, 2005
    I like the brass nut idea, but I would rather not mess with the nut since I allready set it up.
     
  9. +1
    That´s the way I do it when I use individual string bridge parts.
     
  10. Rickett Customs

    Rickett Customs

    Jul 30, 2007
    Southern Maryland
    Luthier: Rickett Customs...........www.rickettcustomguitars.com
    Use copper foil tape, underneath each bridge, approximate where your bridges will sit, drill a hole with a small forstner bit under each one, run a small bit across to the other holes, run copper foil tape to each one and finally drill a hole from the closest to the control cavity, from the last hole and run copper foil to that one (provided that your control cavity is foiled as well). Take a multi-meter and test the continuity from the control cavity, to each bridge strip. If there happens to be no continuity on one or more, just dot some solder, where the tape joins......... This is a way to do it without wires.
     
  11. Musiclogic

    Musiclogic Commercial User

    Aug 6, 2005
    Southwest Michigan
    Owner/Builder: HJC Customs USA, The Cool Lute, C G O
    Once you have the bridges drilled for, you make a very fine cut between each of the front screw holes....3 incisions, you strip 3 pieces of wire fully, make sure each length is long enough to go between screw holes an down into the screw holes, press the wire strands into the incision and into each hole, then drill your wire from the 4th bridge to the cavity you are now grounded on all saddles, you can fill the incision with some gel CA and the wires are blind, if done properly they will be impossible to see. Most who do this on an already made bass will run a very thin piece of copper or aluminum tape between the saddles before mounting(about 1/16" wide), and is barely visable to the player looking right at it, and invisible to anyone more than 1 foot from the bass because of the narrow gap between bridges. This is a common query.
     
  12. heavyfunkmachin

    heavyfunkmachin

    Jan 21, 2005
    sounds complex. ill try on scrap wood first!

    Thanks a lot.
     
  13. Musiclogic

    Musiclogic Commercial User

    Aug 6, 2005
    Southwest Michigan
    Owner/Builder: HJC Customs USA, The Cool Lute, C G O
    Try on scrap, it's really noy as hard as it seems, you just use the back of the exacto or carpet knife blade to press the wire in, but like I said, you can just run a narrow piece of shielding tape, which is the easiest, and if tou decide to switch bridges, it's non invasive. So you have options.
     

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