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Installing Castors

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by Cat, Jul 30, 2001.


  1. Cat

    Cat

    Apr 5, 2000
    Penn State
    I want to install pop-out castors in my peavey 4x10 cab. I already got the wheels (peavey ones too), I just don't know how to install them. I guess I have to drill holes in the bottom of my cab but I don't know how far to go and I'm worried about damaging the cab.
     
  2. gfab333

    gfab333

    Mar 22, 2000
    Honolulu, Hawaii
    I installed a generic set of detachable casters on my Eden 2-10T cab. It's easy.

    First, make sure you have a drill bit that matches the width of the caster "socket piece" (I assume you bought the detachable set, which consists of two pieces - the detachable wheel, and the socket piece). Then measure and position the holes so that they are centered, relative to the side of the cab. Drill the holes, install socket piece, and screw down with the screws that are provided. I was worried that the carpet covering would jam, or get tangled with the drill bit, but there was no problem.
     
  3. Cat

    Cat

    Apr 5, 2000
    Penn State
    yeah the hard part is the drilling. how deep do you drill? is there any danger of damaging the case or going too far? my peavey is ported on the bottom and i'm worried that if i drill too far it will puncture the enclosure and then the bass won't sound nearly as good.
     
  4. gfab333

    gfab333

    Mar 22, 2000
    Honolulu, Hawaii
    On my Eden, I just drilled through the port, but not through the enclosure which houses the speakers. I had enough clearance within the dimensions of the port to accomadate the casters.
     
  5. Want a little carpenters trick? Place the screw alongside the drill bit (while its in the drill) where the screw comes up to, place some tape around the drill bit. Then drill as far as the edge of the tape. This ensures you drill no further than the screw length.

    Make sure the drill bit is slightly smaller than the screws, try different sizes on a scrap piece of wood until u get it right. The screw should be slightly tight to screw in but not too tight that you end up really working it. This ensures the teeth of the screw bite into the wood and cause a firm hold, and they won't come out due to being used a lot.

    There ya go, 101 in wood work.

    :D:D

    Merls