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Installing threaded inserts

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by ii7-V7, Dec 30, 2005.


  1. ii7-V7

    ii7-V7

    Aug 4, 2002
    Baltimore, MD
    How?
     
  2. Son of Magni

    Son of Magni

    May 10, 2005
    NH
    Builder: ThorBass
    The end with the slot goes in first. Get a machine screw with the right thread for the inside of the insert, and put a nut on it. Then screw it into the insert so the nut is against the top of the insert. Now by turning the machine screw you can drive the insert into the hole :hyper:
     
  3. You are quite mistaken that the end slot goes in first. This is only true of the inserts shipped with Moses necks. This is NOT true of the steel inserts I use and sell nor of any other machine screw insert available for use in wood. The slot in these inserts is the drive system used with a flat blade driver to twist them into the wood.
     
  4. Son of Magni

    Son of Magni

    May 10, 2005
    NH
    Builder: ThorBass
    I'm sorry, but the question was not very specific. The only inserts I use are brass inserts for pickup installation, etc. They cannot be driven in from the slot, only the way I described.

    If he said bolt-on neck inserts I wouldn't have ventured to answer this...
     
  5. ii7-V7

    ii7-V7

    Aug 4, 2002
    Baltimore, MD
    You're right. The question is not specific enough. I'm talking about the threaded inserts that you can use to replace the wood screws that bolt the neck to the body. I'm working on a neck and would like to use the threaded inserts rather than reapplying the wood screws.

    So, Hambone! How do you drive the inserts in?
     
  6. The smaller inserts are put in with a straight blade screwdriver. The larger ones use a hex wrench drive. Either way, I use a drill press to assist in the crankin' and pushing. I use the smaller for retrofitting and where there is questionable room to share with the trussrod. The large ones I use when clearance isn't an issue.
     
  7. Marcus Willett

    Marcus Willett Supporting Member

    Feb 8, 2005
    Palm Bay, FL
    Endorsing Artist: Bag End - Dean Markley - Thunderfunk
    Better to revive an old thread than start a new one.

    A question for the luthiers out there...

    I understand the mechanical arguments for threaded inserts. I have a bass neck I'm thinking of having it done to (it's a softer wood, so it makes sense). What I have never seen addressed is the sonic/tonal impact (if any) that using threaded inserts has, as opposed to wood screws.

    It's probably not significant, but there has to be some sort of effect on the tone of the instrument...?
     
  8. 62bass

    62bass

    Apr 3, 2005
    I've used it to replace a couple necks with graphite necks so any difference in sound would be the graphite. I did however, use threaded inserts to replace the wood screws on my Fender P. I can not tell a bit of difference in the sound. But I'm feeling more secure that it won't move.

    I've done it on a couple solid body guitars too. No difference there either.

    I suppose it's a good idea on necks that are removed often, although I can't see why someone would have to do that.

    One of the key things to do is to drill the proper size pilot hole for the inserts. Hard maple is not too forgiving. It's best to use either a drill press or a drill press attachment for a hand held drill. Drill some test holes first in some scrap wood and buy a few extra inserts to use for practice.
     
  9. Marcus Willett

    Marcus Willett Supporting Member

    Feb 8, 2005
    Palm Bay, FL
    Endorsing Artist: Bag End - Dean Markley - Thunderfunk
    In my case, it's a neck made of douglas fir. I've had them done both ways (i.e., wood screws on one and inserts on the other). I'm gonna have one of the necks swapped to another body, so I thought I might go ahead and do the inserts then. The mechanical advantages are prety compelling.


    I make no claim to be a luthier. I'll be having my usual tech do them; he's done that sort of work before, so it's not a big deal. In fact he got excited when I even suggested it, saying "Oh yeah, that would be much better."
     
  10. fenderx55

    fenderx55

    Jan 15, 2005
    NYC/Queens
    I've done it on a rosewood neck (without a drill press but I wouuldn't recommend that) it helps if you have to remove the neck to adjust the trussrod. I would guess that it minimizes wear on the wood.
     
  11. Rodent

    Rodent Supporting Member Commercial User

    Dec 20, 2004
    Upper Left Corner (Seattle)
    Player-Builder-Founder: Regenerate Guitar Works
    Here's one reference for you:

    http://www.talkbass.com/forum/showpost.php?p=2540627&postcount=1

    in this case the impact of installing threaded inserts had a significant impact - elimination of the traditional deadspots

    all the best,

    R
     
  12. Marcus Willett

    Marcus Willett Supporting Member

    Feb 8, 2005
    Palm Bay, FL
    Endorsing Artist: Bag End - Dean Markley - Thunderfunk
    That's the kind of info I'm looking for. Thanks.
     
    BassikLee likes this.