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Instructional Books: (good ones?)

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by Casey C., Apr 9, 2002.


  1. Casey C.

    Casey C.

    Sep 16, 2000
    Butler, PA, USA
    I want to expand my play bass playing skills. I have been playing for 3 & 1/4 years now. I took lessons for about 1 year. I played for 6 months before I started with the lessons. My step dad had little tips here and there and that was it. I have been thinking of improving my skills and I don't want to take lessons again really, so I've been thinking about buying some books.

    Is there any books recomended for my level? any books that I shouldn't buy? Any recomendations on chord, scales, note reading, etc. type books?

    Thanks alot! :)
     
  2. slade

    slade

    Apr 5, 2001
    Depends on the style you want to play but a great one to start with is "The Improvisors Bass Method" by Chuck Sher. Great information from beginner to monster. You can't go wrong with " Standing in the Shadow of Motown" The book about James Jamerson. Another cool book is " The Great James Brown Rhythm Sections" of the Funkmasters series books. Pretty good start anyhow...... good luck!
     
  3. Boplicity

    Boplicity Supporting Member

    If you are interested in blues, "Mel Bay's Complete Blues Bass Book" with CD by Mark Hiland is one of the best and most complete on the topic. Working your way through this book will give you a solid foundation in not only blues, but also for rock, gospel, pop, and country.

    Gary Willis has wirtten two excellent instruction books, "Fingerboard Harmony for Bass Guitar" with CD and "Ear Training for Guitar and Bass" with CD.

    Ed Friedland has two thorough books on walking bass lines, each with a CD.

    There are a few good ones on slapping. One is by Openhiem. I can't find it because I am in the process of moving and all my bass books are packed away. Sorry that I can't give you the exact name.

    Lastly if you want to really get deeply into theory and improv, check out Tony Levine's "Jazz Theory", a $35.00 spiral-bound book.

    All these books have been an immeasurabale help to me. Several of mine are practcially falling apart from use.

    Let me add that most bass instruction books are at least fair. I have bought many and none were what I would call "bad."