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Intervals

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by Sippy, Feb 13, 2006.


  1. Sippy

    Sippy

    Aug 1, 2005
    Stuart,Florida
    In my music theory class we are starting to identify intervals. I'm doing my homework and was wondering if you can check up on it for me.

    KEY:: A=Augmented
    d=Diminished
    M=Major
    m=minor
    P=Perfect

    1.)A-C# A3rd
    2.)E-C P4th
    3.)F-Db m6th
    4.)B-E P4th
    5.) F-Cb d5th


    those are five out of the 20 that I did and if those are right then the others are probably correct. My question is. What is the difference between a minor interval and a diminished interval? #5 to me looks like a m5 rather than a d5. Could somebody explain to me why it isn't an m5? Is it because You cannot have a Major 5th, because it's a Perfect 5th; therefore when you flatten the second note it's diminished and not minor? Thanks!


    Mike
     
  2. BassChuck

    BassChuck

    Nov 15, 2005
    Cincinnati

    #1 is a Major 3rd
    #2 is a minor 6th

    The rest is cool.

    Making a Perfect interval smaller by a half step (raising the lower note or lowering the upper) makes it diminished. Making a Perfect interval larger by a half step makes it augmented. The reason for the glitch in the naming is historical. Its best just to memorize this stuff and get on with making music. Good Luck.
     
  3. Sippy

    Sippy

    Aug 1, 2005
    Stuart,Florida
    Doh! I can't believe I got #2 wrong :( that was an easy one, thanks for catching it though.

    "Making a Perfect interval smaller by a half step (raising the lower note or lowering the upper) makes it diminished"

    Yea but lowering a perfect or major interval by half step, isn't that also making a minor interval?
     
  4. Richard Lindsey

    Richard Lindsey

    Mar 25, 2000
    Metro NYC
    No, and that's just the definition. Lower a *major* interval by a half step, and you get a minor interval. Lower a *perfect* interval by a half step, and you get a diminished interval. Lower a *minor *interval by a half step, and you also get a diminished interval. That's just how it is.
     
  5. Correlli

    Correlli

    Apr 2, 2004
    New Zealand
    a major interval raised by a semitone = augmented interval
     
  6. Sippy

    Sippy

    Aug 1, 2005
    Stuart,Florida
    okay okay so I lower a major and I get a minor and if I lower a perfect I get a diminished. Okay, my college book actually says "lower a major OR perfect by 1/2 step. The result is a minor" and then it says "lower a perfect by a half step and the result is a diminished"... I guess that's a typo?
     
  7. seventhson

    seventhson Supporting Member

    Aug 12, 2005
    Seattle, WA
    yes, typo.

    and, no, the naming convention between perfects vs. majors aren't arbitrary. the reason why perfects are perfects is because when you invert a perfect interval, you get a perfect interval (4th to 5th and vice versa). with majors/minors, you invert one, you get the other.
     
  8. Sippy

    Sippy

    Aug 1, 2005
    Stuart,Florida
    alright whoo hoo! I understand it now. Thanks guys :).. I owe you all a beer if you're ever in FL ;)
     
  9. I've posted a short lesson for Intervals on the sputnikmusic.com bass lessons, music theory section. You'll have all the information you need in your textbook, but sometimes it's good to learn from various sources.
     
  10. Sippy

    Sippy

    Aug 1, 2005
    Stuart,Florida
    Thanks a lot! I really appreciate the tip I'm gonna check it out now!