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Intonation - Epi Thunderbird

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by Griev, Oct 5, 2008.


  1. Griev

    Griev

    Aug 30, 2008
    Sunny florida
    Hey,

    Recently put some power slinkies on my epi tbird and the intonation on my E (dropped to D) is quite sharp. I've moved the saddle as far back as I can and can't seem to get it close. Do I make a truss rod adjustment?
     
  2. XylemBassGuitar

    XylemBassGuitar Supporting Member Commercial User

    Aug 14, 2008
    Durango, CO
    Owner and Operator, Xylem Handmade Basses and Guitars
    Nope, a truss rod will have very little, if any noticeable effect on your intonation (unless the neck is grossly backbowed or upbowed).

    Is the E string sharp all the way up and down the fretboard? Or only in a few specific places?

    What quality bass tuner are you using? Really cheap tuners can sometimes read the intonation incorrectly.

    Are you sure that the string is contacting the saddle on the right point, and not a little farther forward than it's supposed to?

    Did your last set of strings have proper intonation for the dropped D?

    The reason you have to move the saddles back to get proper intonation is that the strings stretch a little bit when you fret them, raising the pitch slightly. Moving the saddles back effectively lowers the pitch enough to compensate for the stretch. A string that is tuned down to D from a standard E will stretch more and thus require more compensation, which your bridge may not be able to give (shown by the fact that you have the saddle adjusted as far back as it will go). You might be able to improve your situation by getting a heavier E string. The heavier string will require more tension, and thus will stretch less, requiring less compensation.

    Also, lower action will require less compensation as the strings will have to travel a shorter distance to the fretboard when fretted, thus stretching less.

    Get back to me on the questions I asked above and I can probably help a little more.
     
  3. Ric5

    Ric5 Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jan 29, 2008
    Colorado
    I grow organic carrots and they are not for sale
    I really dislike those 3 point Gibson / Epiphone bridges ...
     
  4. Griev

    Griev

    Aug 30, 2008
    Sunny florida
    The string seems to be sittin in the saddle right. I moved up to .110 for my E string.

    I nenver checked intonation before I put the new strings on because I've never done a set up or anything before. My tuner is a 20$ solutions metro tuner.

    Thanksfor the help.

    I may try lowering the action a bit more.
     
  5. kyral210

    kyral210

    Sep 14, 2007
    Manchester
    I have a Korg DT-10 tuner, and I have the same problem. I have to reverse the E saddles to get it far back enough to intone correctly. Very annoying. I have considered replacing the bridge with a Wilkinson (?) new one designed to fit right into the 3-Point system, but its too expensive.

    Why is it Gibson just dont care about bassists?
     
  6. XylemBassGuitar

    XylemBassGuitar Supporting Member Commercial User

    Aug 14, 2008
    Durango, CO
    Owner and Operator, Xylem Handmade Basses and Guitars
    Good luck setting it up the way you want it Griev. Let us know how it turns out.
     
  7. lowendblues

    lowendblues Supporting Member

    Oct 8, 2004
    Ohio
  8. Griev

    Griev

    Aug 30, 2008
    Sunny florida
  9. Griev

    Griev

    Aug 30, 2008
    Sunny florida
    Sorry for the double post. I lowered the bridge and finally have intonation!

    And a much lower action. It all worked out. :)
     

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