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Invited to give a "clinic" to kids with special needs

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by JoseNeville, Oct 22, 2013.


  1. Hi:

    I was invited to give a "clinic" or a workout to kid with a special needs. I'm a father of a autistic child and a professor of mathematics. I always give conferences about mathematics and statistics but never about music. I need some ideas.
    At this moment my idea is.
    1) Take my basses amp and show to them.
    2) Explain how it's works
    3) Play with my looper
    4) explain the different sounds of my pedalboards.
    5) Create a simple loop a let the kids play some notes with one of my basses.
    6) I can play a song and sing with them.

    Thanks for your ideas and time,
    Jose
     
  2. Do your list in reverse order. Play and sing first - then engage them in the music. Play as long as is needed until they are all engaged. Let them lead the discussion, if they choose to. Avoid the tendency to explain. If they want explanation, they will ask. Autistic kids think in concepts before they think in specifics. That is why they are incredible with math and numbers games- they see patterns way before normal people do. And why they love music so much.
     
  3. JellinWellen

    JellinWellen

    Oct 18, 2012
    Texas
    Yeah reverse the order, I've got an autistic brother and his attention span is nonexistent unless you get him interested right away, or it looks/sounds interesting.
     
  4. They are a mixture of a special needs kids. My song it's the one how is autistic so, I know a little bit. He moved to other school, and the teacher it's having hard time finding people that gives "conference". She love my mathematics conferences, but this is new for me. I do it because she ask me to help her.

    1) Play a song and sing
    2) Create a simple loop and let the kids play some notes with my basses
    3) Play and used different sound of my pedal board
    4) Ask for questions
    5) If they ask I can explain how it's works my basses and the pedalboard

    Continue with the ideas,
    Thanks
     
  5. I volunteer helping 2nd and 3rd graders with their math facts. The teacher sends me a child and we go over addition facts. One thing that pops out right away; each of those children need my help in a different and specific way.

    I would think this would also hold true with what you are going to do. As far as a lesson play. What are your objectives? What do you want the children to gain from your efforts. I think that will guide you with what needs to be done. I too would think patterns will eventually be of interest, but, when is the time to introduce this aspect of music seems to be the question. Is your main function to entertain or teach. Or is your main function to introduce them to music? You already know how to capture and hold there interest better than I do and for what it is worth a song to open and ........ talk to the people at the facility I think they will be more help than we will. Good luck.

    Thank you for caring.
     
  6. bkbirge

    bkbirge

    Jun 25, 2000
    Houston, TX
    Endorsing Artist: Steak n Shake
    That's really nice, guitar players need encouragement too. :bag:

    Seriously though, I love your ideas, especially the looping one. And I think the poster above me is spot on saying each kid needs different and specific attention. Since you are a math guy maybe you could tie it in there, show the frequencies and how other instruments fall on them. I don't know if that concept would be too difficult for the students though.
     
  7. It's a hour entertainment not a academic one, but I will do the same about how I manage the kids. When I do my math workout I let the kids to interrupt whenever they have any doubt or questions. I always tell their teacher I will manage the audience don't worry it's all start taking at the same time, for me that's the measure of a good "lecture" for kids.
     

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