1. Please take 30 seconds to register your free account to remove most ads, post topics, make friends, earn reward points at our store, and more!  

INYONATION CHANGES FROM GUITAR TO GUITAR

Discussion in 'Basses [DB]' started by NEFFCO, Mar 19, 2009.


  1. i checc my stops with a tuner and i use markers but my e string is always flat on g if i hit the marker when i'm playing with others .i play with a couple bands and depending on the guitar every thing moves.i think i should move my bridge farward on the e to compensate .and i'm putting new strings on this week so any info on it will help.is this due to string highth on the guitar?everyone i play with uses a good tuner and i always eyeballl the **** out of others tuning.
     
  2. Eric Swanson

    Eric Swanson

    Oct 8, 2007
    Boston, MA
    While I can certainly relate to your intonation issues, I think you may be on the wrong forum. This is Double Basses.

    You know, the big instruments with no frets?

    A repairman can adjust your EB's bridge, if you can't do it yourself with some time, patience, a tuner, and your ears.

    Good luck with your issue.
     
  3. tomshepp

    tomshepp Supporting Member

    Jan 11, 2006
    Maynard MA
    Wow Eric, you sure are up early!:)
     
  4. Eric Swanson

    Eric Swanson

    Oct 8, 2007
    Boston, MA
    Yeah, I know, but then, so are you!

    Weekdays, my body gets up at 4:00, and is at work by 5:45. My brain wakes up sometime much later in the day, if at all...

    The wacky stuff we do to make a living...:)
     
  5. Blah blah , , hes got a DB , maybe you guys need more coffee .....if your out of tune at your markers and your bridge is in the right place , Id hazard a guess that the marker is out or you should all use the same tuner , and your never going to be perfectly in tune all the time , good luck buddy.
     
  6. Marcus Johnson

    Marcus Johnson

    Nov 28, 2001
    Maui
    I guess it's different inyonation than it is in muhnation.
     
  7. very different , took me a while to work that out ..
     
  8. Phil Rowan

    Phil Rowan Supporting Member

    Mar 2, 2005
    Brooklyn, NY
    In mah nation?? Aww hell no, in YO nation!! Sh****t!!
     
  9. Marcus Johnson

    Marcus Johnson

    Nov 28, 2001
    Maui
    That's ok, mate... I'm sure I can't pronounce "Murwillumbah"... :D
     
  10. Dont worry about it ,a lot of Aussies cant either .
     
  11. Eric Swanson

    Eric Swanson

    Oct 8, 2007
    Boston, MA
    Sorry if I misunderstood. The OP's profile doesn't list anything but guitars (except on the GAS list). So, I am still not sure what instrument they're talking about.

    If it is DB, it is out of my experience to play the bass by position markers; I never considered the OP was talking about DB. Its not about coffee, it was just a foreign concept. So I learned something new today.

    As far as always being out of tune, that hasn't been my experience; I just don't accept it. I know many DB players who consistently play in tune. Its a question of degree.

    The good fortune of studying with some great teachers, years of practicing double stops and shifting exercises, plus singing the notes I want to play (internally) have sort of cooled out the playing out of tune thing. As Sam Sherry puts it, "inadvertant microtonality" happens, but its not an accepted part of playing bass, in my limited experience.

    So, if your markers are out of tune, move them, if they are moveable. If they aren't, you'll have to move the nut, the bridge, or both. Hopefully, whoever put the markers there had the bridge in the right spot when they did it. You'll need a good luthier's eye for that one, I think.

    Perhaps learning to play without looking at the fingerboard would work, too. That's what a lot of folks do, who are looking at the music, a conductor, or other musicians when they play.

    Just a few thoughts. Shorry for mhy blahtahnt misuhndersthandhing...:)
     
  12. shadygrove

    shadygrove

    Feb 14, 2008
    Marysville, WA

    Let me see if I've got this straight, you check your double bass intonation with a tuner on both the open strings and against the marker but then when you play with others the g is out of tune? Is your bridge leaning?

    I agree with Eric that it's much better to learn to use your ears to play in tune than rely on markers.

    A guitar tuned well to open strings can still have poor intonation. If the string height of the guitar has increased from when the intonation was set it will go sharp and you by comparison will sound flat. Worn down frets can also do this.
     
  13. Jazzcat

    Jazzcat

    Jan 20, 2009
    Titusville, FL
    Sorry, but that looks like PUI to me.
     
  14. Wrong forum.......geez....damn bass guitarists always getting lost.....
     
  15. TroyK

    TroyK Moderator Staff Member

    Mar 14, 2003
    Seattle, WA
    This is my favorite thread. Thank you ever so much.
     
  16. shadygrove

    shadygrove

    Feb 14, 2008
    Marysville, WA
    Glad I could contribute to your favorite thread Troy, although I'm still not sure if my response to the OP was at all relevant to whatever he was trying to say.

    His command of the English language reminds me a bit of our young friend from Omaha who had unfortunately already melted down and was headed to Smithsville before I logged onto TB last night... I never even got to say goodbye :crying:
     
  17. Eric Swanson

    Eric Swanson

    Oct 8, 2007
    Boston, MA
    I am wondering if it still fits in a blue Prius with the position markers on.
     
  18. zeytoun

    zeytoun

    Dec 19, 2008
    Portland, Oregon
    If not, you can move the bridge to compensate.
     
  19. drurb

    drurb Oracle, Ancient Order of Rass Hattur; Mem. #1, EPC

    Apr 17, 2004
    Yup, he's over on Smithville and irritating people already! (See posts 8, 11, and 12 over there.)
     
  20. jgroh

    jgroh Supporting Member

    Sep 14, 2007
    Pennsylvania
    I dont know whats INYONATION but here in the US...uh...I forgot where I was going with that.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.