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Is $3500 a fair price for a '74 J ????

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by engedi1, Apr 24, 2010.


  1. At least you can still remember. LOL

    Your dough, you decide where it should go.
    First find out how long they've been sitting on the bass. Months or years? Pick the perfect time to negotiate. 2 pm on a Monday or Tuesday afternoon is good cause there will be less distractions in the store and less sales that day. (Less dough in the till) Only talk to the guy that can make it happen, not someone who has to check with that someone. Stay on the sales floor don't go into the office. If it's his office he'll be in control. Talk cash, real cash. Pictures of the presidents. ..... Nothing moves negotiations quicker than dead presidents. .... Set a price in your head and stick with it. If he won't budge on the price ask what else he can do, strings, gig bag or whatever you need. Act serious but don't be too serious. Joke around a bit and tell a funny story if you can. Also accept maybe it might not be yours. If you offer and he says no he's lost a sale you haven't lost a bass. You turn and walk then wait a few days and return when he's there, say hi, but don't talk about the bass. If he asks, tell him you're not sure maybe you'll go Lakland or look on Ebay. ..... They all hate Ebay.
    Good luck
     
  2. engedi1

    engedi1

    Sep 16, 2005
    Nashville
    Well, JD was trying pretty hard to get me to buy it. He is a good guy, and has a lot of experience with vintage, and I generally trust what he says. Since he is consigning these, the owner has probably set the price...That 65 P was off the hook. Like $11,500

    I will certainly play it a few more times, I have to wait a few weeks for my return (filed and extension, long story) before I will have the $$$, so i have a good cooldown period.
     
  3. Jim C

    Jim C Is that what you meant to play or is this jazz? Supporting Member

    Nov 29, 2008
    Bethesda, MD
    The answer is: it all depends
    A super clean, dead mint 70's bass is a blue chip stock in that it will always maintain resale and grow (perhaps slightly) over time; the cleaner it is, the more it's worth

    I have 4 70's Fenders; some of them have sucky necks and 1 weighs a ton; I personaly would rather have a killer player that was all original but somewhat beat up; that may not be what you want

    OTOH I'm told that AC's are great instruments; perhaps a used AC is the best bet for high quality and strong value / resale

    Also have a 60 P bass; I played a possesed SX at the crap bar gig last night; for whatever reason, this one works better than some high $$ basses
    Just because it's old and Fender does not guarantee a good instrument
     
  4. Doc Halo

    Doc Halo Musician, heal thyself.

    Oct 10, 2004
    Nashville, Tennessee
    If JD was trying hard to get you to buy it, you must really need it. :D

    Seriously, you should definitely take your time--a refund related cool-down sounds like just the ticket: if that Jazz is still speaking to you in a few weeks, you'll feel like you did the right thing in buying it.

    BTW, the '65 P was a sunburst, and the asking price was $6,500. The $11,500 Precision was the Candy-Apple Red '62. :eek:
     
  5. fenderbassman55

    fenderbassman55

    Oct 17, 2009
    USA
    I just went to Corner Music's Website. No 74 Jazz shown on current inventory. These dealers will not come down much on asking price as they can 'wait' for 'right' buyer to pay near or close to asking price. IF you really like the bass, buy it. Perhaps the guy will take $100 off. Figure it this way. IF you buy any of the above mentioned 'new' basses, their value will tumble the minute you walk out the door. Buy the old Jazz made out of seasoned wood, and it will eventually pay you back 5 -10 years from now. You will have had the joy to own and play it for years...its a win - win. Treat yourself , you only have one trip on this earth. JMO.
     
  6. For less than that price, you could get a passive Nordy vJ that will blow any 70's Fender out of the water.

    Edit: yes, IMO... I've owned both and IME, the fit, finish, playability and tone of the vj Nordy was superior.

    However, that said, the Fender does have a certain vibe...

    Matt
     
  7. johnk_10

    johnk_10 vintage bass nut Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 16, 2008
    Thousand Oaks, CA
    John K Custom Basses
    in your opinion of course.
    and investment-wise, IMO, just how much will that nordy appreciate in value in 5-10 years?
     
  8. fenderbassman55

    fenderbassman55

    Oct 17, 2009
    USA
    How can you be sure? New wood versus old? New guitars and basses just don't have it. Besides, what is a new bass worth after you pay for it? It will never go up in value in your lifetime. After you buy a 'Nordy' VJ, turn back around and re enter the store. Ask the owner of the store what he will give you for it, 'used'? :)
     
  9. GreaserMatt

    GreaserMatt

    Sep 4, 2004
    Seattle, WA
    Except that it's not a 70's fender....
     
  10. fenderbassman55

    fenderbassman55

    Oct 17, 2009
    USA
    Sweet. I also have a 72 J just like this one with more wear however!
     
  11. tb420

    tb420

    Sep 23, 2008
    Am I missing something? Tree's are nearly 100 years old before their cut. So your 2010 Ibanez could have wood from the 60's. Does that mean it will sound more like a 70's Fender? :help:
     
  12. johnk_10

    johnk_10 vintage bass nut Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 16, 2008
    Thousand Oaks, CA
    John K Custom Basses
    the wood ages differently after it's been cut into a body.
    i talked with Leo Fender about it years ago, regarding his wood selection and cutting/drying process. yes, the tree may be 100 years old, but before they're cut, they're still alive and full of water and sticky sap.

    he used to buy his wood, and after it was cut into 2" thick planks, and was kiln dried a minium of three years, before cutting it into bodies. and he told me that even after that, once the wood was cut into a body, they still had a relatively high moisture content.
     
  13. fenderbassman55

    fenderbassman55

    Oct 17, 2009
    USA
    So John is this why newer basses have a thud to their sound and no ring? I find new basses sound a lot like the pickups and such, rather than a 'woody' tone? I'll take 'the sound' of an Alder 1966 Jazz, 8lbs 11 ounces any day! Tell me your opinion. I 'think' Sunburst vintage Fender basses have better tone than custom solid colored ones do.... Thanks for your expertise.:hyper:
     
  14. MEKer

    MEKer Supporting member

    May 30, 2006
    Go play a few other high end basses and see if the Fender-Gas is still there. And THEN decide the proper price for the Fender if that's what you want-----

    also, I'd be looking at prices offered by others on same/similar Fenders to make sure of current ballpark figures.
     
  15. fenderbassman55

    fenderbassman55

    Oct 17, 2009
    USA
    More solid advice.
     
  16. johnk_10

    johnk_10 vintage bass nut Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 16, 2008
    Thousand Oaks, CA
    John K Custom Basses
    IME, it definitely has alot to do with it. i've set up/repaired/restored thousands and thousands of basses, and the ones that were played ALOT also had alot more resonance over the vintage ones that were kept under a bed.

    even the later poly finished fenders that were played a ton, had alot of resonance. the guitar that comes to mind that exemplified this most was when i refretted Walter Trout's 74 blonde hardtail start (his main guitar forever), and even though it is poly finished and has a heavy ash body, that thing really had some tone, due to it being in constant use since he bought it brand new.

    when wood ages, the celluar structure slightly changes when it dries out, and a nitro finish allows the process to happen alot faster than a poly one.

    whenever i build a new bass (or guitar), after i final shape the body and neck, i dry them out for a minimum of 4 days in a room that has it's temp set at 90 degrees, and when they come out, they actually weigh less than when they went in. when i knock on them with my knuckle, all of them have alot more 'pop' (resonance) to them, especially the swamp ash ones. and the maple necks have ALOT more resonance too. after that i limmediately acquer seal them so they can pick up any moisture from the environment.
     
  17. fenderbassman55

    fenderbassman55

    Oct 17, 2009
    USA
  18. johnk_10

    johnk_10 vintage bass nut Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 16, 2008
    Thousand Oaks, CA
    John K Custom Basses
    as far as the bass that the OP mentions in this thread, if that particular bass just speaks to him like no other, then i think that its easily worth what they're asking for it, as IMO, its a pretty safe investment buying an all original 36 year old fender bass as compared to buying something new. i've played alot of older ones than that, that didn't do it for me, so for me, it just comes down to the actual one that you're evaluating/considering. for me, playing music is all about inspiration, and finding an instrument that makes you happy when you play it is the most important, whether its 50 years old or 5 days old.

    even though i have quite a few vintage basses, i used a brand new ricky 4003 (not even one day old!) on my gig last night, and it sounded and felt amazing, so i'll be using it as my main live bass for a while.
     
  19. fenderbassman55

    fenderbassman55

    Oct 17, 2009
    USA
    Let us know OP if you buy the '74!! More good advice John K.
     

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