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IS A 15 WATT AMP GOOD FOR...

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by Canadianbassman, Jun 23, 2000.


  1. I JUST BOUGHT A BASS LAST WEEK AND I ALREADY HAVE A BAND,BUT I ONLY HAVE A 15 AMP AND THE 2 GUTIAR PLAYERS HAVE I THINK 20 WATT AMPS PLUS A DRUMMER AND WILL THE BASS BE WASHED OUT BECAUSE OF MY LITTE PRACTICE AMP? [​IMG]
     
  2. RickenbackeR

    RickenbackeR

    Mar 28, 2000
    Hehe... seems like the three of you are going to be washed out by the drummer [​IMG]

    RICK- [​IMG] -SOUND
     
  3. Most likely, you will be washed out by your guitar players, and definitely by your drummer. Conventional wisdom is, you need at least three times as many watts as your guitar player to be heard. Some people say ten times as many watts. I'm running 650 watts right now against a 50-watt guitar amp and I do fine (I'm on 1, he's on 8 or so). Drums are the real problem. I'd get at least 200 watts, then you'll be safe in almost any situation. 15 watt amps are for practicing, not playing in a band.
     
  4. RickenbackeR

    RickenbackeR

    Mar 28, 2000
    Hey, where in Canada are you from? Your profile doesn't say anything, man!
    Im from the sh!thole called Regina, SK.. I think RobW is canadian too.

    Cheers!
    RICK- [​IMG] -SOUND
     
  5. I'm From Ottawa and my band is coma and thanks i quesse i should at leat use a 50 watt amp
     
  6. B.Hendrix

    B.Hendrix

    Mar 24, 2000
    Atlanta, GA
    IMO, 50 watts makes a good practice amp. If you are playing hard rock/heavy metal - you need to be up around 300 watts (at least) with a 8X10 cab (or 2 4X10) to move maximum air!!
     
  7. Old Blue

    Old Blue

    Mar 18, 2000
    Texas
    A 15 watt bass amp is pretty much limited to practice only - and then without a drummer. It might hold up against some low powered guitar amps, but for gigs you'll need a lot more power. Even 50 watts will be too little for most places you'd likely play. You'll need to get the most wattage you can afford. It's better to have too many watts available and not need 'em, than to need 'em and not have 'em.
     
  8. All right thanks for the help but kepp it coming
    [​IMG]
     
  9. Kelvin

    Kelvin

    Apr 30, 2000
    Singapore.
    If you're doing a jazz gig (not fusion), you could get away comfortably with a 100w combo, otherwise the drums will smother you.
     
  10. Brooks

    Brooks

    Apr 4, 2000
    Middle East
    15W is enough for practicing alone, or with accoustic guitars. For a band situation, minimum 200W RMS into 8ohms, and with cabs that have very efficient drivers (speakers). Personally, I use a Carvin 1000W Head and 4x10" plus 1x18". Just enough against a guitar, keyboards, vocals (through a 650W PA with 4 Roland cabs) and drums.
     
  11. With al due respect to everyone, I don't agree.....

    Bass amp power depends just as much on the sound you are going for as anything else. You can get away with a 50 watt amp as long as you are not looking for floor shaking bass, and are quite happy with a clear, middy sound that will cut through, and you have a guitarist who doesn't use an over distorted bassy EQ. Even with a drummer.

    In my experience combo amps with 15" speakers need more power than combo amps with 12" speakers...more goes into the bass reproduction.

    So this rules out hard rock and metal, but a 50 watt amp will do very well thank you for rock and roll, and much blues.

    Hell, I have played bass through a 40 watt pro reverb (don't ask, weird gig. One guitarist was using a Blues Jr, another a Fender SF twin ) and was more than loud enough. With a drummer and with entirely unsuitable speakers in the Pro, which is a guitar amp!

    I currently use a 50 watt amp, and due to its exceptional clarity (it's an Ampeg BA112) it has done everything I have asked it to do where a BXR wouldn't. The BXR60 doesn't have the clarity of the Ampeg, and doesn't punch through to the same extent.

    I mike the thing up as necessary. I have played some gigs with it unmiked, though.

    Andy
     
  12. White_Knight

    White_Knight

    Mar 19, 2000
    USA
    Good points all. I especiall agree with Andy: how much power you need depends upon your style of playing and preferences. For example: I like to play jazz and ska. Generally, this means a fair amount of low bass which translates into more of a wattage need.
     
  13. I think a 15 watt amp is good for sitting on while you.....nevermind.
     
  14. Munjibunga

    Munjibunga Total Hyper-Elite Member Gold Supporting Member

    May 6, 2000
    San Diego (when not at Groom Lake)
    Independent Contractor to Bass San Diego
    mmmmmm, but seriously, folks. C'mon. I'd say 100 watts is an absolute minimum for gigging with a band in a SMALL venue. My 300-watt amp is just at the edge of being underpowered for most bars or other gigs with more than 100 people. I'd never dream of gigging my 100-watt Workingman's 12, with the possible exception of a bookstore or coffee house, neither of which I play. 50 watts? Forget it. 15 watts? Headphone amp.
    No offense, OK?
     
  15. <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Munjibunga:
    mmmmmm, but seriously, folks. C'mon. I'd say 100 watts is an absolute minimum for gigging with a band in a SMALL venue. My 300-watt amp is just at the edge of being underpowered for most bars or other gigs with more than 100 people. I'd never dream of gigging my 100-watt Workingman's 12, with the possible exception of a bookstore or coffee house, neither of which I play. 50 watts? Forget it. 15 watts? Headphone amp.
    No offense, OK?
    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    So I gig with half of the absolute minimum....

    Here's food for thought. The reason I sold my 200 watt Marshall was that it was underpowered. I couldn't hear it. Now I gig with a 50 watt amp that cuts it. The reason is that most of those 200 watts were going into shaking the floor.....

    It really does depend on the sound you are going for. If you have 2 or 300 watts going into unproductive, non-penetrating frequencies, you need more power. If you have 50 watts focussed into what cuts through, you don't. My bass is not subterranean, but that suits me fine.


    I can hear the 50 watt easily on stage. I can mike it up (I have an AKG D112 especially for this purpose) and it sounds fine.

    Andy

     
  16. BassGroove74

    BassGroove74

    Jun 24, 2000
    hey guys I got aquestion...

    I play through a Carvin Rl600 and bi-amped Cyclops set-up usually.

    My guitarists use a Marshall valvestate 65 and a crate 65(new w/ effects)/.

    We are gojng to my cabin in the mountains for July 4 to jam in the woods.

    They want to plug into the generater and play outdoors. I don't want to lug my bis amp.

    I also have arecording stuidio and was planning on buying a small amp to record with when the drummer is not here and iwas going to use it to go to my bros house to write songs (apartment) ONCE A WEEK AND late night practicing.

    My question is I cannot be happy without that wondeful tone I get from the carvin amp (lots o mid range) and my CVarvin Bass. Can I possible get this in a realtively small cheaper amp for quick travel purposes?

    Any suggestions? How is that new ampeg 112?

    I would actually like a new sound so a SWR might be cool but I don't want anything that sounds like those Fender amps yuck had one hated it traded it in a month.

    Any suggetsions for a travel/practice generator amp for unser 500 bucks?
     
  17. Old Blue

    Old Blue

    Mar 18, 2000
    Texas
    Check both of Ampeg's 50 watt combos. The BA-112 and the B-50R both have very good tone for a smaller bass amp.
     
  18. FillyTheKid

    FillyTheKid

    Apr 21, 2000
    I have a 200 watt Fender BXR head and on 3 through the second input, (the first has a 6db boost) because of my active bass, through 1/15" and 2/10" i can be heard fine.
    Outdoors, indoors, hall, garages etc...
    EQ, Speaker size (the more air the better, as long asit can get out), bass and people your playing with all have a big effect on what you need.
     
  19. Warren D Morphis

    Warren D Morphis

    Jul 4, 2000
    I would say you need at the least,100 or
    200 watts to maintain your presence in the
    mix.How loud is your drummer/your guitarist?
    Remember,you are trying to push low frequency energy out,and still maintain a
    decent tone.To move air,you need actual
    usable wattage.In a typical trio setting,
    something like a Peavey TNT 150 will do
    fine in small clubs.(Plus you can always
    mike it for optimum throw!) Warren [​IMG]
     
  20. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Warren D Morphis:
    How loud is your drummer/your guitarist?
    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Don't expect any reply from the originator of this Topic as he has been banned from the board. I think it has been retained as it will be of general interest to beginners who are thinking about how powerful an amp they need.