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Is everybody tone deaf ?

Discussion in 'Bass Humor & Gig Stories [BG]' started by Gman, May 25, 2002.


  1. Gman

    Gman

    Jan 4, 2000
    Indianapolis, IN
    We played a show last night at a small tavern that we've played once before. The first set went fairly well, till we got to "Jumpin' Jack Flash", and of course, we all play a differnt version and can never seem to get it right. From there it just seemed to go down hill fast.

    Drummer can't remember how to start or end any of the songs, guitar player starts songs off 1/2 step flat, I can't seem to find my 7th fret in the middle of "For Your Love", and some drunk chick wanting to hear "Turn the Page" keeps going down the hallway where only I can see her, and flashing me. Her friend wanting to hear Free Bird, keeps looking at me and deep throating a beer bottle. Yep, that's a little distracting.

    Have you ever had one of those nights when you felt like the whole thing sounded so bad, you were ready to pack it in after the second set and play for free, but the bar owner and the crowd tells you that you sounded great ? How can they not hear it ? Is it that they don't care that it's a little off, or do they really not hear it ?

    I'd just like to hear your take on how this happens.

    Dave
     
  2. This happened to me just the other day. Me, 2 of my guitarist friends(one for lead, one for rhythm, though the rhythm one was playing the solo), and my drummer friend were going to play for the talent show Say it aint so by Weezer. We never played together, so we needed to jam one time. Well it never happened.

    So we went to school the day of the tryouts and asked if we could practice together. They said ok, so we went to jam. 8th period rolled around and we had to go perform (we found out we were on first!). So the rhythm guitarist needed to go check in with his 8th period teacher to get out of class to perform. Well, he couldnt leave. So as we get on stage, he doesn't show up. We are forced to go on first too...they said we couldnt leave and find him. Too add to the fun, my guitarist that was there said he wouldnt tune down when i already did. So we played it through and when it came to the solo, we skiped it. 1) No solo 2) Bass is 1/2 step lower 3) Never practiced with them before 4) other guitarist wasnt there 5) guitarist was going too fast. I thought we did horrible (which we did), but people came up to me and told me how good it sounded. 10 people must of said that to me. I also heard that we got a 38 or 39 out of 40!
     
  3. I don't know if it's just that regular, non-musician type people are just impressed that you can play, or if they're just being polite. I've played with a few bands and a lot of small shows in my time, and no matter how much we sucked, people were usually generally positive afterwards. Maybe it depends on the crowd or the genre of music you play. I was with a metal band for several years, and those crowds don't hold back at all if they think you suck.
     
  4. lneal

    lneal

    Apr 12, 2002
    Lee County, Alabama
    Gman, I feel your pain!

    Up on soapbox:

    I think most average listeners just don't know good music or musicianship. If you don't believe me, turn on the radio! I have played in everything from smoky dives to cabaret rooms to major outdoor festivals and have found that precious few people appreciate good music and musicianship. Also, people are so insensitive to musicians and say some of the most cruel things. One night some drunken, toothless idiot kept hollering "Skynyrd!" Finally, after about 30 minutes of it the singer said, in a very polite voice "I'm sorry, we don't play any Skynyrd". The guy says "git offa the -gd- stage!" Don't get me wrong, I like Skynyrd, but give me a break!
    You just have to decide if this is something you are willing to overlook, and if so then you must learn how to deal with it. Its tough, but the joy of playing has to be kept intact within you. I've been doing this for about 27 years, and believe me this lack of understanding doesn't get any better!

    Off soapbox.

    Don't know if that makes it better or worse, but its my $00.02
     
  5. Christopher

    Christopher

    Apr 28, 2000
    New York, NY
    Beer. The cause and solution to all of life's problems.
     
  6. yawnsie

    yawnsie

    Apr 11, 2000
    London
    Funnily enough, it's always the other way round for me...
     
  7. ldiezman

    ldiezman

    Jul 11, 2001
    Nashville
    I hear ya man. The worst i thought I ever played I got the most compliments from. We were playing with three other bands that night.. I was playing and I felt that Myself (not the band as a whole) was performing terribly... Well it sucked because one of the bass players in the bands playing with us that night was supposed to be some sort of bass God supposedly... well.. we get done and i'm all pissed off. the bass God walks up to me and says "Man how long have you been playing, you were tearing it up on stage!?" needless to say that was a confidence booster :).. but there sure were alot of drunk folks yelling and screaming.. You are your biggest critic.

    Another occassion.. The school of music I attend was getting re-credited again and we had to have this concert for the people comming there and what not.. Well myself along with one other graduate student had to sing on the concert. I thought I performed kinda poorly.. I didn't feel good and my mouth was dry..... oh and not to mention the fact that I was more nervous than I ever have been in my life... I get done.. and was waiting for my voice teacher to drill me. He turns around and says "not bad Jimi, you're improving".. I told him I thought I sucked it up and he said "It wasn't perfect, but you did the best you could have done at that time...." So we don't always do as poorly as we think we do or did

    sorry just a story or two i wanted to share with you guys