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is it possible to blow my speaker if....

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by SkaKing27, Jun 8, 2003.


  1. SkaKing27

    SkaKing27

    Sep 1, 2002
    St.Louis MO
    yes,I was wondering...Ok,so I have a 150 watt head,and my cab can handle 200 watts,so basicly what I'm asking,will it ever be possible to blow my speaker?
     
  2. Richard Lindsey

    Richard Lindsey

    Mar 25, 2000
    Metro NYC
    Yes, it is possible if you turn your amp up too high.
     
  3. Turock

    Turock Supporting Member

    Apr 30, 2000
    Melnibone
    That could depend on several things, such as... who the speaker is and where he is speaking.
     
  4. kirbywrx

    kirbywrx formerly James Hetfield

    Jul 27, 2000
    Melbourne, Australia.
    :rolleyes: :D

    Yes, it is possible. Wattage plays a rather large part in the blowing of your speaker, but why on earth would you want to do it? :confused:
     
  5. SkaKing27

    SkaKing27

    Sep 1, 2002
    St.Louis MO
    I don't want to,I was asking if it was possible,so I don't do it.
     
  6. kirbywrx

    kirbywrx formerly James Hetfield

    Jul 27, 2000
    Melbourne, Australia.
    Yeah it is. To make sure you dont blow it, keep your pre-gain on or below 4, and use the master volume (and the volume on your bass if possible) to get the desired volume.
     
  7. phogchris

    phogchris www.scarsoflife.com

    May 27, 2000
    Boca Raton, FL
    Could you explain why this is? Why 4? I am having a bit of trouble with my amp right now as far as distortion...If you are supposed to only go to 4, why CAN you go to 10? I am just curious, and not being sarcastic in any way.
     
  8. geshel

    geshel

    Oct 2, 2001
    Seattle
    If your amp distorts too much, you can easily blow the tweeter (if it has one) - or at least any fuse in the cabinet on the tweeter.

    As for blowing the woofer, I don't know. The cab should be able to handle 150w of continuous clean power at moderate frequencies (say 100Hz) for long periods of time, if it deserves the rating. If the output of the head is distorting, it could be asking the woofer to do too many things it can't (lots of spikes etc), and that will cause it to heat up faster, and it might burnout. Hard to say.

    The cabinet won't, however, likely handle 150w over it's entire range. Meaning, 150w of pure low bass would probably cause it to bottom out (and rattle), and if you did this enough / hard enough, it could blow.
     
  9. Petebass

    Petebass

    Dec 22, 2002
    QLD Australia
    My experience with small amps is that you often have to push them really hard to get over the marshalls and drum kit. That's when clipping comes into the equation and things can start to blow up.

    As for the input gain, the "don't go as high as 4" rule may not be scientific but it a lot of cases it's pretty much right. But it depends on the strength of the signal from your bass.

    If your amp has a clip light, it's easy to work out how high to run your pre. Turn the pre and master volume down so there's nothing getting to your speaker. Whack your bass as as hard as you would during normal playing, now whack it a bit harder again to account for adrenalin, alcohol, and/or and the affect hottie in the front row. Bring your pre gain up until the clip light starts to flicker occasionally. You're set. Resist the temptation to run the gain hotter and gon't be affraid to run the master much higher than the pre. Keep an eye on your clip light.
     
  10. kirbywrx

    kirbywrx formerly James Hetfield

    Jul 27, 2000
    Melbourne, Australia.
    There you go. I dont have any idea why it goes up to 10, perhaps just to even up the scale? I do not know. But just to be sure, dont go over 4.
     
  11. phogchris

    phogchris www.scarsoflife.com

    May 27, 2000
    Boca Raton, FL
    Cool, thanks, I still haven't had the chance to solve the distortion problem I have, but I think it is because I am clipping the preamp too much. I should know on Wednesday.
     
  12. Petebass

    Petebass

    Dec 22, 2002
    QLD Australia
    . I remember reading an interview with Mr Peavey himself. He remembers building his first amps all those years ago so that 1 was 1, 10 was 10, and moving the knob anywhere between 1 and 10 produced a nice linear increase in power delivery. To him that was logical.

    Trouble is the guitarists of the time would compare their volume knobs at band volume. The guys using Fender amps would have it on 4 while the peavey guys would have em on 7 to get the same volume. So everyone sole their Peavey amps for Fender, not realising that the Fenders had nothing useful in them after 4.

    So to stay in business he had to change the design of his amps to comply with what everyone else was doing.
     
  13. Okay....

    the "set it to 4" rule is utter crap. There's like a dozen things that influence the input gain level setting.

    Set your input gain so the input amplifier part of the preamp doesn't clip/distort. That's all there is to it!!! There's no magic number that works for all amps, basses, cables, EQ settings, active/passive differences, playing style, pick technique etc. etc. etc.

    Setting the input gain of an amp requires some experience and skill. Learn to listen to it and recognize a clipped signal. If you hear a clipped signal, turn back. Period.

    On my smallest amp, I set my input gain at switch setting 5, which is the highest setting. On my VF-1 preamp/effect unit I run it at 11 o'clock. On my previous preamp/effect unit, I run it at 93% out of 100. On a Trace combo I once played I maxed the input gain. On a Hartke head I set it at 4 (would you believe that?!). On any other input I turn up until it clips, then back off a bit.

    OK, I'm done rambling. I'll take my medication now.