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Is the "neck bend" technique bad for the neck?

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by Mulder7, Apr 11, 2018.


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  1. Mulder7

    Mulder7

    May 4, 2017
    I use this technique from time to time and I really like it. Where you grab the body and neck and bend the neck slightly to lower the pitch, like a whammy. Is this going to ruin the necks of my basses? My basses are bolt on. I don't want to stop doing it but I also don't want to have to replace a neck. Anybody who does this ever have a problem? (Besides that idiot in that famous video snapping some crappy Acoustic in half)
     
  2. rickdog

    rickdog Gold Supporting Member

    Mar 27, 2010
    I used to do this. A few years back when I had my Jazz bass worked on, the luthier asked "why is the truss rod adjuster sunk so far into the neck?" Fortunately he was able to solve that problem with a washer behind the adjuster.

    I can't prove there was a relationship here. But think about what the truss rod is trying to do, and what happens when you flex the neck against that. Just sayin'....
     
    Mulder7 likes this.
  3. Mulder7

    Mulder7

    May 4, 2017
    Maybe I should just invest in a pedal that has pitch shifting capabilities. But bending the neck looks so much cooler. Haha.
     
  4. Maxdusty

    Maxdusty

    Mar 9, 2012
    Michigan USA
    Guess it depends how much pressure you apply really. Used to do it and didn't notice any long term effects.
    Of course you could just get a tremolo bridge put on your bass if it's something you do frequently - also adds a little extra to what you can do.
     
  5. Yes, you’re pulling the bolts (screws) out, as a luthier informed me long ago. I started doing it when I saw Marcus Miller do it, but I stopped when I realized that he can get a new bass every night, and I can’t.
     
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2018

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