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Is there anyhting special about the note 'F'?

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous [BG]' started by kirbywrx, Jan 11, 2004.


  1. kirbywrx

    kirbywrx formerly James Hetfield

    Jul 27, 2000
    Melbourne, Australia.
    I was watching the Distillers film clip (Drain the blood) eariler today, and during the bridge, I noticed that the guitar hits a note that wasnt played during the rest of the song.

    Anyway it turned out she was playing 1st fret, E string, which is an F. So I went and played along with the song, and sure enough, the note was a F. Does this frequency have a special property, because I can always tell when a guitarist/bass player hits an F. Is it my ear, or what? To me, I can always recignose (SP?) the F because its more throaty than all others.

    Does anyone else know what I mean, or am I just 'special' :D

    Cheers
    -Kirbo
     
  2. Kirby...if i recall, the bass is an "F" instrument, thus making it stick out to you and maybe making it the "best" sounding note!

    PS! Anyone who knows for sure, PLEASE correct me. Also, if im correct, what does being an "F" instrument mean? I know it sounds funny i could know the information without knowing what it means, but thats how it goes sometimes i guess!
     
  3. Wrong Robot

    Wrong Robot Guest

    Apr 8, 2002
  4. CamMcIntyre

    CamMcIntyre

    Jun 6, 2000
    USA

    Someone could correct me if I'm wrong but bass is a C instrument. We read in what is also called the F clef. This refers to the dots on the bass clef go around the line F, thus making it the F clef. We call bass a C instrument since we don't transpose like the Bbs, F, Eb, etc instruments do. We do transpose up an octave though [what we read sounds down an octave]. That's all
     
  5. kirbywrx

    kirbywrx formerly James Hetfield

    Jul 27, 2000
    Melbourne, Australia.
    Oh...damn...:( :D
     
  6. Pause

    Pause

    Jun 4, 2003
    Miami, FL
    Yea, basses (and all strings) are C instruments... So they are non-transposing instruments. I'll never understand the whole "transposing instruments" thing, or how people play these instruments like horns... oh well
     
  7. Nick Gann

    Nick Gann Talkbass' Tubist in Residence

    Mar 24, 2002
    Silver Spring, MD
    If certain instruments didn't transpose, their notes would be all on ledger lines above or below the staff. They transpose to make it easier to read the music.
     
  8. OOOK, C instuments. I play euphonium also and could not remember if it was F or C.
     
  9. Nick Gann

    Nick Gann Talkbass' Tubist in Residence

    Mar 24, 2002
    Silver Spring, MD
    Baritione, euphonium, trombone, tuba, flute, and stringed instruments are all in C, FYI.
     
  10. i say its probably your ear. im the same way with D, for some reason i can always pick out a d easily.
     
  11. Nick Gann

    Nick Gann Talkbass' Tubist in Residence

    Mar 24, 2002
    Silver Spring, MD
    F is the note I tune to when I tune my tuba. F is the only note I can recognize by pitch at the moment. I'm working on others. C is the only other note I can kinda recognize on its own.
     
  12. Pause

    Pause

    Jun 4, 2003
    Miami, FL
    Isn't this the reason why C clefs were invented? Why can't they just all be C instruments? :confused:
     
  13. Nick Gann

    Nick Gann Talkbass' Tubist in Residence

    Mar 24, 2002
    Silver Spring, MD
    Because thats just how it is.
     
  14. Pause

    Pause

    Jun 4, 2003
    Miami, FL
    Well, dammit, it shouldn't be!
     
  15. Nick Gann

    Nick Gann Talkbass' Tubist in Residence

    Mar 24, 2002
    Silver Spring, MD
  16. kirbywrx

    kirbywrx formerly James Hetfield

    Jul 27, 2000
    Melbourne, Australia.
    :p
     
  17. embellisher

    embellisher Holy Ghost filled Bass Player Staff Member Supporting Member

    Sounds as if you have a small part of what is known as perfect pitch. A person with perfect pitch can recognize any note instantly, and can hear differences between on pitch and another.

    I have good relative pitch, and can identify instantly the sound of a strummed E chord on a guitar. It has a certain tonal quality that just jumps out at me. Can't do it with any individual notes, though.
     
  18. Meehaw

    Meehaw

    Jun 11, 2003
    Gdynia, Poland
    My guess is that we're so used to songs in E-minor, that we feel a little uneasy when we hear F, as it isn't used that much in the tonality. That's why we can always notice it.:)
     
  19. Blackbird

    Blackbird Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Mar 18, 2000
    California
    re-cog-nize.:D

    Maybe it's not that you're hearing the "F" note, but simply the IV chord of a song. the harmonic movement from the I chord to the IV is one of the strongest and easiest to recognize, regardless of key.

    A dominant V chord has the same harmonic movement when it resolves to a I chord. It's what they call a perfect cadence.
     
  20. Actually, a tuba can also be keyed in Double-B-Flat, and a French tuba is keyed in F, I believe.