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Is this gap a problem?

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by JACink, Mar 10, 2013.


  1. JACink

    JACink

    Mar 9, 2011
    Spain
    So, a while back I bought a cheap jazz bass for practicing whilst I am away from home.

    I have actually found the bass to be quite nice to play (neck is comfortable), so I was thinking of getting some new pickups for it.

    However, whilst inspecting the bass (I usually just play it!), I realised that there is a gap between the bridge pickup and the body (see photo below), in other words, the route is too long.

    So I am asking if this body is worth changing the pickups on, or should I just scrap the idea?

    (BTW, the other end of the pickup sits flush to the route)

    attachment.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. SJan3

    SJan3

    Dec 8, 2010
    Ct.
    This is fairly common. If you dig the way it plays, I think its worth it. Its gonna be a player, not a showpiece...right?
     
  3. bongostealth

    bongostealth Supporting Member

    Jun 3, 2011
    Atlanta, GA
    It's not a problem at all. It doesn't affect the sound or playability of your bass. It might actually be a good thing in case the new pickups you install are a bit longer than the stock pickups. That way the extra gap can potentially accommodate pickups that are a bit longer.
     
  4. giacomini

    giacomini

    Dec 14, 2008
    Florianopolis - Brazil
    Endorsing: Copetti Guitars
    Maybe someone put a neck J pickup in the bridge position?
     
  5. If the other end of the pickup sits flush, my guess would be that someone put in a pickup that's smaller than the original routes. Maybe it's using, as giacomini said, a neck J in the bridge position.
     
  6. JACink

    JACink

    Mar 9, 2011
    Spain
    Thanks guys!!
     
  7. giacomini

    giacomini

    Dec 14, 2008
    Florianopolis - Brazil
    Endorsing: Copetti Guitars
    If you plan to change pickups, just make sure to take all the measurements of your route and compare with the new pickup.

    Not only length, but also the space between the 2 holes for the screws on both sides of the pickup...

    I usually check for dimensions on manufacturers sites or at bestbassgear.com, they have dimension diagrams for most pickups they sell.
     
  8. JACink

    JACink

    Mar 9, 2011
    Spain
    Good advice, thanks!
     
  9. Bongolation

    Bongolation

    Nov 9, 2001
    California
    No Bogus Endorsements
    The picture's not really big enough to be meaningful.

    Oversize pickup routs are there for purposes of alignment correction, especially since this benighted "tight neck pocket" idiocy has forced its way into build policy against good construction practice, thereby eliminating the main traditional method of alignment of the Fender design, neck angle.

    If the pickup's pushed over to one side to get the pickup poles aligned with the strings (as you say it is) there's your answer.

    I've seen extreme examples of this even on new American Standards. You could just about roll a marble into the gap.
     
  10. JACink

    JACink

    Mar 9, 2011
    Spain
    Actually the poles are not aligned with the strings, in fact, if the pup was mounted exactly in the center of the route, the poles would pretty much align perfectly!!

    I think it is just a case of shabby workmanship during assembly!!
     
  11. Bongolation

    Bongolation

    Nov 9, 2001
    California
    No Bogus Endorsements
    Sounds like it!

    I've seen a lot of that, too! ;)

    But the reason for those wide routs is to get out of jail on pole alignment.

    You'd think that in these days of CNT, they could have everything aligned perfectly to about .005" but apparently not. I've seen some Chinese stuff where every single dimension was off from every other rout or hole on the entire body. It was just amazing.

    Interestingly, The FJ stuff from Dyna-Gakki has a lot tighter clearances on their routs than MIA Fenders and they still manage to get it all straight. Usually.
     
  12. I think is on the "acceptable error" side. Not to worry about....
     
  13. Ian_Flash

    Ian_Flash

    Jan 17, 2013
    Traditional J-Bass P/Us are two different sizes. Either the bass has the same size route for both P/U's, or one P/U is in the wrong position. Neither is a fatal flaw as long as the bass sounds and plays well... lots of players put the "Hotter" P/U in the neck position for more guts, and just balance the output with the individual P/U height or the volume controls. Don't get yourself too crazy with it.
     
  14. BryanB

    BryanB Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    My thoughts exactly. Is this a Squire jazz? I believe they use the same size routes for neck and bridge. In any case, this is purely cosmetic. The main concern is that each string is centered over a pair of pole pieces.
     

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