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Is this good??

Discussion in 'Off Topic [BG]' started by page, Jan 6, 2005.


  1. I found out my class ranking and GPA today. I m a sophmore in high school and out of the 181 people in my class, I rank 79 academically. My GPA is 3.0 . Is this good??? Will it help me get into college??

    I can probaly do better, im just kinda lazy! :D
     
  2. generally colleges will accept anything 3.0+, but the closer you get to 4.0 the better with scholarships etc. i had a 4.2 and got a full ride, but my friend that had a 3.8 ended up having to get loans to attend the same college...

    anyways, good luck, and apply for colleges as soon as possible.
     
  3. MJ5150

    MJ5150 Terrific Twister

    Apr 12, 2001
    Lacey, WA

    Depends on what college you want to attend. Stanford would laugh you out the door with a 3.0, as would Notre Dame or MIT.

    Flash that 3.0 at a small community college, and they will probably have no problems. There is also a middle ground between the two extremes I listed. :)

    -Mike
     
  4. Marlat

    Marlat

    Sep 17, 2002
    London UK
    Can someone explain the GPA concept to me?
     
  5. temp5897

    temp5897 Guest

    GPA = Grade Point Average. A= 4 B = 3 etc etc. So if you had a 4.0 GPA it would mean you are a straight A student. If you were 3.5 you could assume half A's and half B's. (or perhaps lots of A's and a few C's). It's just a numerical average to quickly describe where your grades generally were.

    Of course with not all schools being equal, it's also important to know where the GPA was attained. Getting 3.5 at UCSD is quite a bit different than 3.5 at SDSU for example (both well known San Diego schools).
     
  6. well here is how ours works:

    you get a number grade in a class (0-100), which is then translated to a letter grade (A-F) which is then translated to another number (0-4)

    now that i think about it, that is pretty silly...


    anyways, 100-90s are As, 80-89s are Bs, etc


    and here is how the letter grades translate on a 4.0 gpa scale

    A 4.0
    B+ 3.5
    B 3.0
    C+ 2.5
    C 2.0
    D+ 1.5
    D 1.0
    F 0.0

    then, they take the points you got for each class and multiply it by the number of credit hours the class is worth, then add up the totals of that for all classes, and divide by the number of credit hours you've taken.

    wow, that looks a lot more complicated on paper... basically GPA is an overall grade of all your classes. hope that helps you understand.
     
  7. Marlat

    Marlat

    Sep 17, 2002
    London UK
    How do you get a 4.2 if 4.0 is the highest?
     
  8. temp5897

    temp5897 Guest

    Because there are honors and AP (advanced placement) classes where everything is one point higher, i.e. A= 5, B = 4 etc.

    If a GPA is unweighted though, those values would be like a regular class and 4.0 would again be the maximum.
     
  9. MJ5150

    MJ5150 Terrific Twister

    Apr 12, 2001
    Lacey, WA

    Same question I was about to ask Mark...let's see if Mr. 4.2 has a logical answer for us???? :D

    -Mike
     
  10. heres mr 4.2s logical answer: read jareds last post


    :D
     
  11. MJ5150

    MJ5150 Terrific Twister

    Apr 12, 2001
    Lacey, WA
    Thanks David....when I was in school, we didn't have 5.0 for AP/Honors classes. Congrat's on being highly successful in school by the way.

    -Mike
     
  12. thanks bud :)
     
  13. jive1

    jive1 Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jan 16, 2003
    Alexandria,VA
    Owner/Retailer: Jive Sound
    Even if the 3.0 won't get you into the college of your choice, you can always start out at a community college, or some other school and transfer. They'll weigh your college GPA more highly than your high school.
     
  14. Marlat

    Marlat

    Sep 17, 2002
    London UK
    Ah understand now. It seems like a complicated system but we have something here. In your last two years of highschool you are assessed and the total of your score in each subject is rated (say out of fifty) relative to the rest of the state.

    The mark out of fifty is then adjusted to take into account the relative difficulty of the subject (relative to other subjects) ie a 25/50 in Latin may be equvalent to a 45/50 in basic maths. The total of your adjusted scores are added together and then all the students in the state are ranked out of 100 in 0.05 percentiles. That score out of 100, called your "ENTER" score is what gets you into university (ie college).

    For example, to get into law or medicine at a top university you need an ENTER score of 99.90 or higher to be guaranteed entry etc.
     
  15. well, in my experiance, high grades aren't exactly guaranteed to get you into a college alone. How active are you in volunteer work? do you get involved in any school groups or anything? colleges look at all of that as well, and that can be more of a determining factor than grades...
     
  16. Ericman197

    Ericman197

    Feb 23, 2004
    Iowa
    I had about 0 real extracurricular activities, but I was able to lie about a few so I could fill out that section and I ended up getting an $8,000 scholarship. Personally, I believe that extra-curricular activities are worthless. The colleges are most interested in your grades and SAT score. Even if you were to bang out a ton of great activities, what would be better? Spending a few hours a day doing sports, clubs and the like, or spending that time studying? That's why my parents never made me get a job or participate in afterschool activities.

    If you were already the validictorian then you could afford to spend less time studying and a little more time participating in such pointless activities as the chess club, dance team or ERASE ( End Racism and Sexism Everywhere club at my school ), but personally, I'd rather just spend that time masturbating. You can take that one step further and slack off in school like I did. Of course, I didn't do poorly, but a 1400 SAT score ( more important that GPA in my opinion, but it's very politically incorrect to say this ) doesn't match up well with a 3.9 GPA.

    Ultimately, unless you're in a position where you can't get into college or you're a real genius who needs to go to a place like Princeton, what college you go to is relatively unimportant. I plan on becoming a doctor, so I don't need to go to a "good" college.

    To the original poster: Do well on your SATs and get your GPA up a bit and you too can be as cool as Ericman197.
     
  17. jive1

    jive1 Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jan 16, 2003
    Alexandria,VA
    Owner/Retailer: Jive Sound
    If extra cirricular activities are worthless, then why did you have to lie about them. It's like saying that a degree is worth nothing and then lying on your resume to get a job. It's worth something, or else you wouldn't have to BS about them. You just wish they weren't important. If you really believed they don't mean anything, why not be honest and say that you spent your time studying instead?

    For some here on TB, athletic scholarships, music scholarships, etc. got them into college. They may be worthless to you, but not to others. And honestly the skills and ideas learned from extra cirricular activities go far beyond your schooling. Learning teamwork, how to get along with others will go much further in life than know what a mitochondria is, or what battle was fought when.

    Extra cirricular activities are good for people on the fringe. If there are two people who have the same GPA and SAT, then the guy who can catch a football or debate will get the last spot.

    Good then you're demonstrating to others that you are a one-dimensional person. Sure you may be multi-faceted, but on paper you won't appear that way. Some colleges not only want a good student, but a good person.

    In the real world, the thing that will supplant GPA, SAT, what college you graduated from, or anything academic will be work experience. A guy who has been programming computers or designing buildings for 5 years will beat out a Harvard graduate 99 out of 100 times.


    SAT scores are just a piece of the pie. In my opinion, a smaller piece than you think. All the SAT says is what you can do on a test. A GPA tells about you as a student, and how well you performed during your academic career. For scholarship purposes, a college doesn't want to waste money on a student who is just gonna slack around waste their money. Not that it doesn't happen, but it's how they are looking. SAT measures potential, GPA measures performance that's why colleges look at both.

    Sure you'll go to a undergraduate program for Pre-Med, but it doesn't mean that it will be accepted by all medical schools. Each medical school will have it's own set of prerequisites, and some pre-med programs won't meet those. Also whether or not a program is accredited will also make a difference.

    College should be more than a piece of paper. Unless you want to run an abortion clinic or be a guy who writes referals for a living, what you learn in school will make a difference. Colleges have reputations, as well as a cirriculum. The medical school you go to will make a difference in the internship, and residency and job. After a while your schooling won't make much of a difference once you have honed your skills on-the-job, but it will make a difference when getting your foot in the door.

    Also college is place to network, make connections, and get a rounded education. If you just want a specific skill, there are plenty of vocational schools out there.


    Unfortunately cool has much more to do with SAT and GPA. Those things are worthless after you've been out of school for a while.

    I love listening to 18 year olds telling everyone how everything will go in life based on their limited experiences. Live in the real world for a while, and then tell everyone how things work.
     
  18. You're a sophmore, so it's a bit early to worry about your GPA right now. Junior and Senior years, yes, but thats about it.


    I'm going to a community college right now and not only are the classes relatively easy, my tuition was only $467 this coming semester. Thats saving thousands compared to some universities, and for the exact same credits. And as someone said, it takes a good college GPA for transfers, and with any luck I'll be going to a better university next fall. Or I'll just hang out another year at home.


    I made a mistake, however, and I urge you not to do this: After getting a projected 1300something on my PSAT, I got cocky and waltzed in the SAT on 4 hours sleep with zero studying, and made a whopping 970. However, I knew I was going to a community college anyways, so I had less motivation to start with. My parents said the only event they'd let me go away for college is if I got a full scholarship somewhere.
     
  19. Nikehawk

    Nikehawk Guest

    Jul 29, 2001
    Yorkville, IL, USA
    Some high schools do a 4.33 = A+, 4=A, 3.66=A-, etc. Hence, the 4.2 average.
     
  20. Ericman197

    Ericman197

    Feb 23, 2004
    Iowa
    I would be embarrassed if I had nothing to put in that section ;)

    My main point is that if you spend the time studying instead of playing sports or doing other such activities, you'd probably have a much higher GPA.

    Colleges don't really care much about people. Ultimately, the college only wants the students who will bring in the most money. This would either be the student who makes millions as an adult and donates money back to the college, or the student who becomes famous and gives the college bragging rights.

    Right, but there's one problem with GPAs: they vary greatly from school to school. This is why they're a poor indicator of a student's performance unless the college has a system of taking the relative difficulty of the school into account. My school is one of the top 50 or so in the state, despite being public ( very rich sending districts ). This makes it very difficult to compare my scores to those of other students in the state/country because the students in my school already rank in the top couple percent in the nation. Furthermore, there are high schools in inner city regions where kids who can't read or write are given high school diplomas. I put more faith in standardized testing because it cannot be faked.

    I'm not talking about community colleges here, just a regular state school vs. first tier schools. Medical schools judge a mixture of the MCATs and GPA. They also look at the "quality" of the school that the student comes from, but at most, that's a secondary factor. You're a lot better off applying to Medical school and most post graduate level positions with a high GPA from any state school than a slightly lower GPA from a well known college.

    Ehhhh, as long as you get into medical school, you'll do well. If you do well in medical school you'll be more likely to get into a good internship, but how well you do as a doctor is more dependant on how well you do in your residency. My cousin was a very mediocre student in high school ( 1200 SAT ), did well enough in college to get into Robertwood Johnson Medical School ( well known, but not top tier ) and through his hard work in residency, he was able to get into a very prestigious fellowship in Invasive Cardiology. Remember, no one cares about anything but the last step. No one at your residency cares about where you went to college, they want to know where you went to medical school ( hence why I feel that college is relatively useless as anything but a means to post graduate level goodness, at least for me ). No one asks my cousin where he went to medical school OR where he did his residency. They want to know who he did his fellowship under.

    Ericman197 is so cool that it does, in point of fact, matter

    I wouldn't take advice from 18 year olds either. Only take advice from those who've actually done it. Of course, I differ somewhat from the average dude because I take advice from relatively well informed people and I differ from the mainstream. As a rule, the mainstream is always wrong. As such, I don't believe in things such as going to a "good" college ( good example of what I consider to be a "good" college: Lehigh ), the "dorm/college experience," scholarships based on anything other than raw scores, doing extracurricular activities for the sake of having done them ( as most people do ), etc.