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ITS FINALLY HERE --> Thanks Everyone

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by SRSiegel, Oct 23, 2001.


  1. SRSiegel

    SRSiegel Guest

    Sep 17, 2001
    Ann Arbor, Michigan
    ok so i can finally play slap again without screwing up my fretless carvin 5er... I am now the happy owner of an ATK USA five string. yeah its a bit old, and I never thought I would go down the "vintage" road... but i just did. its very nice looking. originally transparent blue over awamp ash with a really cool figure. the wood almost looks kinda like diamond plate metal... sounds ugly... but it is cool. the figerboard is flamed maple with double black dot inlays, and a triple dot at the octave. the headstock has an overlay of quilted maple. all the hardware is chrome. Those of you who know the ATK are familiar with the huge bridge that surrouds the triple coild humbucker. the thing is absolutly massive. Its got the old style open paddle tuners, and a big funky headstock. the thing just screams funky. after playing it for a couple days, i can give a pretty solid opinion:

    this thing is kinda heavy, but rather confortable. not as confortable as my carvin, but up there. it is suprisingly ergonomic for a bass of its size and weight. the sound is very very punchy. i have yet to play it through my stack though, as thats kept at my drummers house. but even through a crappy little practive amp the thing does have a good punchy slap tone. playing it fingerstyle almost reminds me of playing a piano. the action is fairly high, but it just has that tigh feel. i also think that the tension free neck has something to do with this. from what i understand, there is a steel bar running through the entire neck and headstock. this bar carries all of the tension of the neck. the wood is really just kinda "hung" around the bar. hence the bar carries most of the sound, which gives the bass a very interesting "ringing" tone. it has a very good sustain. I cant coax many different tones out of the toggel switch, but the active 3 band eq is adequate to change the single tone available to fit different situations. the neck is wide and flat, with a large radius, and a shallow profile. becuase of this slapping isnt a problem. i can easily hit one string at a time without having to mute the other to avoid "cross talk" between the strings when im thumbing. the neck is laminated 5 ways. it appears to be quartersawn maple, with two dark stringers... i have no idea what the stringers are made of though. they are similar in color to my carvin's walnut stringers, so i think it is possible that they could be walnut. possibly mahogony too. i was suprised when i took the picguard off to inspect the original color. its royal blue. the bass is now a really cool sun-faded blueish-green with golden edges. I am guessing that the sun forced the dye further into the wood as the bass aged. I prefer the current color to that under the pickguard. The neck joint is a very tight 5 bolt affair, with the hole and cover plate for the tension free adjustment between the bolts. there is no truss rod. (the tension free design doent incorporate one). the neck joint is one of the tightest I have seen on a bolt on bass. I usually prefer neck throughts, but for what this bass will be used for it is ideal. my one gripe of the bass is the fretwork. Ibanez did an excellet job of leveling the frets and rounding the edges, but their performance of filing the edges down flush with the side of the fingerboard leaves somethign to be desired. this is only on the bottom of the neck though (g string side) and so it doesnt really bother me, as my hand doesnt even usually touch the side of the neck. I was expecting better on a USA custom shop bass though.

    suprisingly i picked up this beauty for $450 bucks. I want to thank everyone here on talkbass for putting up with my whining, and helping put a temporary stop to GAS. I will post a pic of the evil twins soon enough. Thanks again to everyone for their advice.

    ~Scott