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Jack Casady bridge pulling out?

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by Chef, Jul 5, 2005.


  1. Chef

    Chef Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    May 23, 2004
    Columbia MO
    Staff Reviewer; Bass Gear Magazine
    So, the rear post on the estring side of my newly aquired Casady is pulling out...what's the repair procedure here? Is this something I can do, or must I find an epiphone service center near me?

    Thanks, Alan
     
  2. Chef

    Chef Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    May 23, 2004
    Columbia MO
    Staff Reviewer; Bass Gear Magazine
    Bump...

    Do these just glue in there? What kind of glue might be appropriate?

    Thanks! Alan
     
  3. A little drop of white glue to seat the bushing should suffice...unless there is alot of play.
     
  4. Chef

    Chef Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    May 23, 2004
    Columbia MO
    Staff Reviewer; Bass Gear Magazine
    Play? Tension on the strings pulls it right out! It's currently detuned, in the case, crying it's little eyes out!
    It could fly across the room and put yer eye out;)
    The seat is knurled like it out to be a press fit. I imagine a little glue is the answer, want to make sure to use the right product...
     
  5. Chef

    Chef Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    May 23, 2004
    Columbia MO
    Staff Reviewer; Bass Gear Magazine
    Digicam is loaned out right now, but it's like this.

    The three bridge height adjustment screws thread into a big ole nuts that are knurled on the outside instead of hex head. These knurled pieces press into the body. One is loose, and pulls the bridge up and out under string tension. Make sense now?

    You can kinda see the bridge in this stolen pic from epiphone:
     
  6. oh.....boy...what did you do it it? :(

    That's not a good sign at all. First off...try returning it to the music store or whoever sold it to ya.

    If that doesn't work...post back. That requires wood filling, precision drilling, and a arbor pressfit to reinstall the bushing (you're talkin' bout things like this right? bushings)

    Not good man...best of luck with this,

    Nish
     
  7. Calm down. This is common. Trust me, this happens alot with this bridge type. Be it the Casaday, the Alan Woody, the Rivoli, it's common. Doesn't make it right. Doesn't make it an invalid warranty issue. But if you don't want to send your bass out for a repair you can do yourself really quickly, then:

    Slack the strings.

    Remove them.

    remove the bridge plate.

    if you can remove the bushing fully by hand, do so. If not, even better.

    get some alipathic resin (wood glue, not elmers, try titebond)
    put a drop or two around the circumference of the bushing (the knurled edges)

    reseat the bushing. Let the glue set for 12-24 hours.

    restring and enjoy. the bushing will prolly never do it again.

    If you cannot fully remove the bushing, take it as far as possible, carefully apply glue in smae manner, and reseat.

    If you *must* reseat the bushing with a tad more force, use a nylon-covered head small hammer, and LIGHTLY tap until it seats. Most of these basses have a solid centercore. If yours doesn't, take it to a tech.
     
  8. Chef

    Chef Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    May 23, 2004
    Columbia MO
    Staff Reviewer; Bass Gear Magazine
    Yep, like that. According to other Casady owners, it's not uncommon, so I'm hoping for a "common fix."



     
  9. Chef

    Chef Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    May 23, 2004
    Columbia MO
    Staff Reviewer; Bass Gear Magazine
    This is more like what I was hoping to hear. I have voicemail with both Gibson and Epiphone tech centers. I will report back when they get to me...

    Mon, the bush in question will pull out by hand, gently tapping back in didn't fix it...How do I tell of it's a solid centercore or not? I presume I'm looking thru the f-holes for something?

    Thanks, Alan



     
  10. yeah, either thru the f-hole, or simply look into the bushing hole, your top is only 1/4" thick... and since you CAN pull the bushing completely out, take the glue, apply it to a q-tip, apply around the perimeter of the hole (for even more permancy than a couple drops) and then reseat the bushing.


    Best of luck.
     
  11. Chef

    Chef Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    May 23, 2004
    Columbia MO
    Staff Reviewer; Bass Gear Magazine
    From Todd Money at Gibson repair:

    If it's loose enough to pull out by hand, there are two choices: plug the hole and re-drill; or take some real porous paper (legal pad, restaurant napkin) and saturate it with glue, and line the hole with it to in effect make it smaller. Try and push it into the indenets with a toothpick or something. Remember, you don't need to add much. We use super glue gel, but tite-bond is good as well. Neither will hurt the finish of the instrument. Neither will bond wood to metal, so you're just trying to create enough of a friction fit for it not to pull out. It's not rocket science, and you'll be fine attempting this on your own. The lone caveat is: don't try to make the fit too tight, and don't hammer the bush home too hard. While not a delicate instrument, it does have it's limits."
     
  12. Chef

    Chef Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    May 23, 2004
    Columbia MO
    Staff Reviewer; Bass Gear Magazine
    OK;
    So, I pulled strings and bridge, and the one offending bush. While it pulled out easy enough, to tap it all the way back in did require some slight force. I figure there's not really room for .010 worth of paper all the way around. So, I filled the knurls with wood glue, and tapped back in. The other to pried out easily enough, so I glued them back in as well. The threaded knurls are open in the bottom, so I did not put glue in the bottom of the holes. Plenty of glue squeezed out while I was tapping them back in though;) Hopefully this will secure my bridge for some years to come. I'll report back if there are further problems
     
  13. Rody1069

    Rody1069

    Jul 14, 2002
    Philadelphia, PA
    I know this post is over 6 years old and I don't see any reports, so I'm guessing this did the trick? Same thing is happening to mine.
     
  14. HI.

    That should do the trick, yes.

    The most common cause for this happening wasn't adressed though, it requires some care to adjust the string height on all 3-point bridges. If the posts are just ajusted randomly, they will pull out sooner or later.

    Regards
    Sam
     
  15. Pilgrim

    Pilgrim Supporting Member

    Happens a lot.

    Here's one detail - when you apply glue, put it INSIDE the hole. If you apply it on the outside of the post, the glue will scrape off onto the body of the bass when you tap the post in, possibly damaging the finish on the bass.

    That's one of those too-obvious-but-can-be-missed items.
     
  16. Chef

    Chef Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    May 23, 2004
    Columbia MO
    Staff Reviewer; Bass Gear Magazine
    Holy Old Thread Batman!
    I sold mine years ago.
    2005...wow...
     
  17. mongo2

    mongo2

    Feb 17, 2008
    Da Shaw
    Just for the record, I've used superglue to set the bridge bushings on Jack Casady and Allen Woody Sig basses...Hasn't let go yet after several years.