Psst... Ready to join TalkBass and start posting, make new friends, sell your gear, and more?  Register your free account in 30 seconds.

Jaco Lead Sheets

Discussion in 'Recordings [BG]' started by Nick Gann, Jun 27, 2003.


  1. Nick Gann

    Nick Gann Talkbass' Tubist in Residence

    Mar 24, 2002
    Silver Spring, MD
    Hey everyone-

    I am trying to arrange some Jaco songs to be played by my high shcool Jazz Band. We don't really have the proper instrumentation to do it the way it is on the recordings. I need the lead sheets, or an actual score if it is possible.

    I'm looking for lead sheets to The Chicken and Liberty City. I've been to Lucas Pickford's transcription page, and got a lead sheet for The Chicken, but I want something better (if possible) to work with.

    Thanks to anyone who can help me :)

    Nick
     
  2. 20db pad

    20db pad

    Feb 11, 2003
    I been everywhere, man...
    None. At all.
    Until a better answer comes along, do you have Cakewalk? I've gotten midi files off the internet that seem to be correct that can be printed out instrument by instrument using that app.
     
  3. Nick Gann

    Nick Gann Talkbass' Tubist in Residence

    Mar 24, 2002
    Silver Spring, MD
    OOO Thanks for the idea! I totally didn't think of that!! I have finale, but it does the same thing with decoding midi files. Thanks a lot!

    Even so, I'm still looking for lead sheets or scores, but this will give me a start.

    Thanks a lot 20db!
     
  4. 20db pad

    20db pad

    Feb 11, 2003
    I been everywhere, man...
    None. At all.
    hit me with your addy on PM if you can't dig up the midi file for "Liberty City"
     
  5. moley

    moley

    Sep 5, 2002
    Hampshire, UK
    Heh@doing Liberty City.

    Good luck to you, it's a great tune.

    I don't have a lead sheet, but I can give you a start...

    There are four main sections.

    * There's the section with the 4-bar repeated bass riff in G. This comes in right after the horns intro. I guess you'll have to work this out, but each bar starts with a G (even if he doesn't play it on beat 1) - which is just open G string. Then on beat 3 of the first bar you got A B (fret 14 to 16 G string), with an F under it (fret 15 D string). Then beat 3 of the second bar you got a tritone double stop (F @ 15th fret D string, B at 16th fret G string), which goes down a semitone and back up. Then the 3rd bar is the same as the first. Then on beat 3 of the 4th bar, you got a 6th (F @ 15th fret D string, D @ 19th fret G string) which goes down and back up. And that's yer 4 bar repeated riff. He varies it, of course, but that's the basic riff. Over that, the piano etc just seem to be soloing (or rather noodling about) in G, mostly blues scale sorta stuff.

    * That leads into a repeated 8 bar sequence in G. Actually, I don't know the chords but the bass notes are as follows: G F E G# A Eb D C B F E G# A A D D. Over that there's a melody: G B C G# B F C Ab D G G G G. That seems to be repeated 3 times, usually, and on the last time, on the last bar, you got F#7b9 Bsus, leading into...

    * The main section. Or I'd think of it as that. The "chorus", if you like. Best bit of the tune, IMO, pure genius :) It's in E, and the tune/harmony is carried on the horns. Here's what I got for the basic chords: | E G#m7 | C#m7 Bb13(#11)| A7 E/G# | F#7b9 Bsus | E G#m7 | C#m7 Bb13(#11) | A7 E/G# | F#7b9 Bsus | C#m7 F#/G# Bm7 Bb13(#11) | A7 E/G# | F#7b9 Bsus | E G#m7 | C#7 Bb13(#11) | A7 E/G# | F#7b9 Bsus Am7 Dsus |
    The intro is based on this section.

    * There's kinda a "bridge" section, for which I don't actually know the chords, I've not taken 'em down yet. But the bass is basically going from D to C and back, via a C#.



    And there ya go. I'm going on the version from "Word Of Mouth" there, BTW. I don't know what different versions he did, but the version on Invitation had a slightly different structure (the bridge was right near the start), but otherwise pretty similar.

    I hope my ramblings there make some kind of sense to you. I'm actually in the process (supposedly) of writing a lead sheet for Liberty City. I'll shoot you a copy if/when it's done.
     
  6. Nick Gann

    Nick Gann Talkbass' Tubist in Residence

    Mar 24, 2002
    Silver Spring, MD
    Thanks a lot Moley. For sure, let me know when you finish the sheet. FWIW, I'm going with the version on The Birthday COncert.
     
  7. Nick Gann

    Nick Gann Talkbass' Tubist in Residence

    Mar 24, 2002
    Silver Spring, MD
    I have found Jaco transcription books that have the bass lines, but I haven't seen anything that has lead sheets.

    Does anyone know where I can just buy a score for the songs? I've looked online, and I haven't found anything.

    Also, I found a midi for the Chicken, and thanks to 20db pad for the one for Liberty City. The one for Liberty City sounds fine, but the one I found for the Chicken isn't very good.

    This is harder than I imagined :meh:
     
  8. 20db pad

    20db pad

    Feb 11, 2003
    I been everywhere, man...
    None. At all.
    Y'know, a band in the H.S. a few towns over played "The Chicken" back in the 80s when I was in high school - a chart's out there. Here's proof:

    http://www.seventhstring.demon.co.uk/charts/
    http://www.docheuser.de/chart.html


    I can't recall where the high school and collegiate band directors get their stuff, but asking them can't hurt. Those outfits might have it all. You can hit up your own band director or e-mail the teachers at local colleges. They'll know.

    You can also poke around the forum at Jamey Aebersold's site or the Jaco sites and ask there.
     
  9. moley

    moley

    Sep 5, 2002
    Hampshire, UK
    They probably transcribed it from the record, 20db. Which is quite possibly what Nick is gonna have to do :D

    Ultimately, that's where the transcriptions you see in published scores usually come from. Not from the composer (although, they could do - and many of the New Real Book charts do), but from some guy somewhere with a CD player, a keyboard, and some manuscript paper :D
     
  10. Wrong Robot

    Wrong Robot Guest

    Apr 8, 2002
    And usually a really good ear.

    Transcribing is a lot of work, but it's great practice to help with a lot of aspects of music, in the more...erm...academic sense.

    I think I'd put it up there next to sight-singing in my catagory of often overlooked but incredibly useful things to practice.
     
  11. Lenko

    Lenko

    May 3, 2003
    Slovenia
    I have all of his lines written down along with the chords. PM me if you need anything.