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Jazz Bass Wood combinations/Tone

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by pedroferreira, Jul 6, 2005.


  1. pedroferreira

    pedroferreira

    Feb 10, 2003
    Portugal
    Hi.

    I have a 78’ Jazz Bass and it has a “fat” G string. I mean, when I play high in the neck it has a great bottom. I’ve never played another bass with this characteristic. All the basses I try usually had a “thin” G string.
    This is good but has a disadvantage: When I’m playing slap the pops in the G string are too strong, because of the low freqs it has. You may say it’s my technique but it isn’t just that. That string has a unusual (I think) thump, even when I play it acoustically).

    Is this what you call dead spots?

    I am saving for buying a Sadowsky Metro 5 String, and because I can’t try one I have that existential doubt: alder/rosewood vs. ash/maple.
    I’m leaning towards the alder/rosewood but I want to slap the bass without worrying about the loud pops on G string. Is this a common issue with alder/rosewood? Is this why everybody says that ash/maple is a killer combo for slap.

    I don’t use slap a lot ( I have to play for a living :D ), but I want to spend the money that it’s so hard to save, in one bass that can eventually do it all for me.

    I also like more the looks of ash/maple (in natural finish), but I ear everybody telling that you get a thin sound out of it.

    What do you think?

    PS.: This is not a sadowsky thread!!! ;) I happen to want one but I want to hear perspectives for this wood combos and I don’t care if you play sadowsky, fender, lakland, musicman, etc


    Pedro
     
  2. AGCurry

    AGCurry

    Jun 29, 2005
    Kansas City
    No. Dead spots, and their complements, can happen with any wood. Many Fenders have dead spots around the 5th-7th fret on the G string, and you'll find examples of that with alder or ash, maple or rosewood. It doesn't have nearly as much to do with the wood as it does with the construction of the neck.

    Body and fretboard woods really don't have nearly as much influence on sound as 1) your fingers, 2) your style, 3) your amp and speakers, 4) your strings, and 5) your pickups.
     
  3. pedroferreira

    pedroferreira

    Feb 10, 2003
    Portugal

    Yes. I don't think the problem is in the pickups, or it's height.
    This happens acoustically too.

    Pedro
     
  4. pedroferreira

    pedroferreira

    Feb 10, 2003
    Portugal

    Allow me to disagree. I believe that good tone comes from good wood. The bass guitar is a wood instrument and you can hear in your amplifier/cab the sound produced by the instrument acoustically.
    Of course everything you said is right but I think the wood has a great importance to the overall tone.


    Pedro
     
  5. pedroferreira

    pedroferreira

    Feb 10, 2003
    Portugal
    The F# in the G string has a “thump”. So I played the same note in the D string in that octave and got the same result. It has to do with body/neck resonance. It’s the frequency not the strings.
    It’s a characteristic of this bass. I can live with that. I play with this bass for so many years that I can turnaround this using technique.

    What I would like to know is if I buy another bass with this wood combo can I expect this kind of resonance?

    Pedro



    Come on rosewood users help me here :p
     

  6. +1 in a big way on pickup placement. Also, body size has a big impact, with those heavy ash large 70's bodies really capable of dishing the funk... if that's your thing