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Jazz techinuqe question

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by LiquidMidnight, Feb 28, 2003.


  1. LiquidMidnight

    LiquidMidnight

    Dec 25, 2000
    As I'm starting to finally make sense of a lot of things in my pursuit in Jazz, I have one question to ask. While listening to a lot of upright players, I hear them doing a sort of triplet embellishment in straight ahead 4/4 walking lines. (can't really think of a song right now to give you an example of) To me, it sounds like they are being used as a steping stone for big interval leaps, but it's the construction of them that has me confused. I was wondering if anyone knew of any resources that taught primarily about these embellishments? .

    Thanks :)

    edited for spelling ;)
     
  2. JimK

    JimK

    Dec 12, 1999
    Examples can be had in Ed Friedland's "Advanced Walking"(?).
    In addition to the tripletted device, there are also "skips", "ghosted skips", & "pull off skips", & "slurred skips".
    Many of these utilize open strings, too(would be helpful for those "big interval leaps"; Jamerson also employed this technique).
    Hasta...
     
  3. Lovebown

    Lovebown

    Jan 6, 2001
    Sweden
    There aren't really any rules when it comes to those triplets. I think they are useful for adding some rhythmic color and can smooth out an octave shift. Paul Chambers and Ron Carter use them a lot so listen to what they do.

    /lovebown
     
  4. LiquidMidnight

    LiquidMidnight

    Dec 25, 2000
    Thanks for the heads up, guys. I've heard nothing but good things about the Ed Friedland book. I'm really thinking about buying it.
     
  5. Check out _Modern Walking Bass Technique_ by Mike Richmond. This is the book the upright players use.
     
  6. JimK

    JimK

    Dec 12, 1999
    Richmond's book is well worth the $10.
     
  7. LiquidMidnight

    LiquidMidnight

    Dec 25, 2000
    Cool, but can it also be used for Electric?
     
  8. JimK

    JimK

    Dec 12, 1999
    Absolutely!
    ...why wouldn't it?
     
  9. JimK

    JimK

    Dec 12, 1999
    Liquid Assets-
    I pulld out Richmond's book last night...the front cover sez-
    "For Acoustic bass, Electric bass, Tuba, Organ, & Arrangers".

    ;)
     
  10. LiquidMidnight

    LiquidMidnight

    Dec 25, 2000
    Sorry, had a brain fart. :p

    Some things that sound good on a double bass doesn't always sound great on an electric do to different tone and timbre, but walking lines seem to be universal.
     
  11. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY

    Sure. I read an article a few years back by Will Lee in which he referred to the triplet falls as "Bucket o' **** " figures. Best term I've ever heard to describe them.
     
  12. JimK

    JimK

    Dec 12, 1999
    "Bucket-o'-s***" would be a nice way to count/feel those figures-
    "Bucket-o'" = the triplet
    "S***" = the next quarter note

    ;)

    Seriously(for a second)-
    Liquidity...something cool, IMO, is the process of attempting to cop what sounds 'good' on the URB & make it happen on the gadget bass. No?
     
  13. Pacman

    Pacman Layin' Down Time Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 1, 2000
    Omaha, Nebraska
    Endorsing Artist: Roscoe Guitars, DR Strings, Aguilar Amplification
    A chick singer and I came up with "tickle my B***s", which I think fits the rhythmic figure better. :D
     
  14. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    I agree to a certain extent, but I think there are differences - so for me on BG I tend to avoid open strings as the way they sustain, means they can "get in the way" - so they sound different and can ring longer than you want. Plus it's easier to transpose ideas if you avoid open strings.

    Whereas on DB the whole idea seems to be to use open strings as much as possible, to check intonation, help position shifts and play tricky lines more easily. But none of these reasons are compelling on BG, where the neck is physically smaller and so much faster and frets mean you don't necessarily have to worry about intonation .

    On the other hand, it can be good to "slow down" and play something more appropriate to the music, rather than showing off what you can do technique-wise.....so maybe thinking like a DB player can help you play more solid and musical lines?
     
  15. ConU

    ConU

    Mar 5, 2003
    La Belle Province
    Overall the BG sustains too much,especially the fretted,a fretless with flatwounds comes closer...but that ''bumpin'' swing feel is elusive,especially for standards where most band leaders like to hear that traditional DB sound,the triplet patterns can be played correctly,but they don't mimic...we're too ''in front'' with the BG for traditional jazz.
     
  16. LiquidMidnight

    LiquidMidnight

    Dec 25, 2000
    I agree, while I never cared for DB in Rock Music, (Please don't flame me :p But I thought the Stray Cats would have been 100 times better with electric bass) it's tone a characteristics definatley fit the Jazz mold nicley. Still, I would like to hear an electric bassist just rip it up in a straight ahead bebop/hardbop band.
     
  17. JimK

    JimK

    Dec 12, 1999
    Whatever...my thing is this-
    If you only play electric, IMO, it would advantageous to at least know how to walk/swing while improvising over the changes(or no change/no changes). ;)

    I've seen a few BGs playing around here in Big Bands...totally happenin', too(IMO).
    At one time, I think the Buddy Rich Big Band & Thad Jones/Mel Lewis Big Bands of the '70s employed electric bassists.
    Pretty sure Sam Rivers Rivbea Big Band is currently using the BG.
     
  18. ConU

    ConU

    Mar 5, 2003
    La Belle Province
    Certainly,I agree,I think the BG sounds great swingin' hard and for blowing is really expressive,I was just relating frustration with the purists who don't agree and for the most part who don't even consider the electric a legit jazz instrument.
     
  19. LiquidMidnight

    LiquidMidnight

    Dec 25, 2000
    Yeah, the purist rub me the wrong way.

    Luckily where I live, it's a small area and most Jazz cats would just be happy having a bassist at all and probaly wouldn't care to much if it was an upright or a slab.