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jazz theory book?

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by markj, Jul 1, 2000.


  1. markj

    markj

    May 27, 2000
    what do you think the best jazz theory book is .....i want to check on my knowledge of progressions and substitutions.....
    cheers markj [​IMG]
     
  2. Blackbird

    Blackbird Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Mar 18, 2000
    California
    The Improvisor's bass method by Chuck Sher, Sher Music Co.

    Will C. [​IMG]

    ------------------
    You can't hold no groove if you ain't got no pocket!


     
  3. JimK

    JimK

    Dec 12, 1999
    Mark Levine's JAZZ THEORY!
    ...and I do have the Sher IMPROVISER'S BASS METHOD, too!
     
  4. Mike Dimin

    Mike Dimin

    Dec 11, 1999
    Clinician: EA, Zon, Boomerang, TI. Author "The Art of Solo Bass"
    Although The Improvisors Bass Method is pretty good, I have to go along with JimK. Mark Levine's The Jazz Theory Book is the best. Chuck Sher's book takes some shortcuts and doesn't quite explain things as well as Levine's book. Since there both from Sher Publishing, Chuck's gonna make his on either. Then again, there is that book by that Ask The Pro guy right here on this site - what's his name? [​IMG]

    Actually, my book does allow you to actually play the harmony, hear the voice leading and gain a better understanding.

    Mike
     
  5. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    I must also agree that the Mark Levine book is the best single source. I was recommended "The Evolving Bassist" by Rufus Reid recently. Any ideas on whether this gives you any more - in terms of playing Jazz bass?
     
  6. Mike Dimin

    Mike Dimin

    Dec 11, 1999
    Clinician: EA, Zon, Boomerang, TI. Author "The Art of Solo Bass"
    Rufus Reid's book is excellent. It doesn't really explain the theory but does a nice job of giving examples of lines that work over jazz changes. I use it often with my students.

    Mike Dimin
     
  7. JimK

    JimK

    Dec 12, 1999
    Mike-
    Have you started on VOLUME II yet?
     
  8. Mike Dimin

    Mike Dimin

    Dec 11, 1999
    Clinician: EA, Zon, Boomerang, TI. Author "The Art of Solo Bass"
    Jim -

    I've taken on the role of Associate Editor of Bass Frontiers Magazine. I was already to sit down this summer and write it, but with that responsibility and the impending birth of our daughter (any day now). I don't know if I can find the time. I'd also like to use real arrangements, so I have started to look at actual publishers (as opposed to doing it myself). I have been posting original arrangements of jazz standards with notation, real audio and performance notes at www.bassically.net

    I always appreciate your support.

    Mike
     
  9. Monkey

    Monkey Supporting Member

    Mar 8, 2000
    Dayton, Ohio, USA
    Good luck and congratulations on the birth of your little one, Mike.
    I really like "The Improviser's Bass Method", and have found it more useful than the Rufus Reid book, but I haven't delved into the Reid book enough to really say.
     
  10. markj

    markj

    May 27, 2000
    ....thanks for your help on this one guys...im off to get mark levines book...then i spose i better get mikes book.....mike were you ever an insurance salesman....any ot those encyclpaedia britannicas left [​IMG] cheers markj [​IMG]
     
  11. BassGuyNL

    BassGuyNL

    Jul 20, 2000
    The Netherlands
    My favorite jazz instruction book is written by Jerry Coker. I'm not sure what the title is (he's written dozens of books), but it's something like Jerry Coker's guide to Jazz Improvisation. The good thing is, it's not geared toward bass players only, and that helps me to get away from playing the stuff that comes easily on bass. It also has two CDs with lots of examples.