1. Please take 30 seconds to register your free account to remove most ads, post topics, make friends, earn reward points at our store, and more!  

Jeff's Thread. No Topic! Just Go for It. But, Be Nice!

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by JeffBerlin, Apr 9, 2010.


Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Sgt. Rock

    Sgt. Rock

    Apr 10, 2010
    I don't think it's possible to stress how important this is. It's so simple that people gloss over it, but it is the key to really learning parts. If you make a mistake, stop and fix it. Learn it out of time and at a pace that is comfortable for you. There shouldn't be stress in learning a part. Speed and fluidity will come, but not until you know the notes.
     
  2. PiNgtime

    PiNgtime

    Mar 26, 2009

    (teacher + drink + dance + feel) + groove / beat = not a music story anymore


    xD
     
  3. THand

    THand

    Jun 9, 2008
    It is also the exact opposite of a performance oriented approach and really illustrates why art and academics are separate, IMO.
     
  4. JeffBerlin

    JeffBerlin Guest

    Jan 10, 2009
    Could be! I just know that counting teaches one how to play in time and teaches good time more profoundly. Clicks insist on performance, not regard, and lessons are suppose to be about regard and not performance. Besides, classical music was never written to be played in a metronomic fasion so I don't know what the teacher may have been thinking.
     
  5. THand

    THand

    Jun 9, 2008
    Nothing like the smell of mothballs and beer in the morning...:crying:
     
  6. PiNgtime

    PiNgtime

    Mar 26, 2009

    :D
     
  7. JeffBerlin

    JeffBerlin Guest

    Jan 10, 2009
    Playing with Bill was great fun. I learned a lot and I got to play a lot. A total win-win for me!
     
  8. JeffBerlin

    JeffBerlin Guest

    Jan 10, 2009
    I play transcriptions where I can on a 21 fret 4 string bass guitar. And most of the time, what I write out fits, even if what I play can be one maybe two octaves below the written pitches

    I am only interested in the music that I transcribe to teach me things about music that I don't already know about so I don't really worry about where on the bass that I check it out.
     
  9. JeffBerlin

    JeffBerlin Guest

    Jan 10, 2009
    Yes. She is great! She also could have been Miss Venezuela so she is awfully pretty as well. She studied arranging and got into music seriously for a couple of years. She's pretty much the Queen around here, and the students just love her.
     
  10. JeffBerlin

    JeffBerlin Guest

    Jan 10, 2009
    YIPES!
     
  11. Rick Robins

    Rick Robins

    Jan 13, 2010
    Las Vegas, NV
    Hi Jeff! You still use your myspace? I sent you a PM over there about my sheet music questions & dilemma started here. You don't have the PM option here. Hope to hear from ya soon.
     
  12. THand

    THand

    Jun 9, 2008
    I spoke with her this morning, and she was very sweet and helpful to me as well.
     
  13. I've played with alot of women that I don't know. :D:D:D
     
  14. engedi1

    engedi1

    Sep 16, 2005
    Nashville
    I see this thread is devolving fast! I'll try to revert back to a musical questions. Jeff, I am trying to learn a difficult piece (for me) which is bach gigue on the Eb cello suite. I have totally abandoned my old method of using a metronome and slowly increasing the beat to learn hard music. I have got about 75% under my fingers, but a 25% of the passages are just not as clean as the rest.
    What do you do when you have a piece that is technically challenging (like your ravel piece) to get it under the fingers? Does it just come down to learning the hard passages out of time? How then you get it to concert speed?
    FYI, I am hoping to record this piece for my website, so I want it to be picture perfect. THX!
     
  15. JeffBerlin

    JeffBerlin Guest

    Jan 10, 2009
    Bada BIIIINGGGG!
     
  16. JeffBerlin

    JeffBerlin Guest

    Jan 10, 2009
    I practiced the Ravel piece without playing it with Richard for two weeks. Then I recorded the music. I also had a piano version to play along with. It was practice and it was really hard. Still, if you review slowly the parts that are difficult for you until you can play them well, even if it is slow, then the next day and they day after that and the day after that, your speed will slowly go up. But, almost nobody can play new music or hard music well in just a couple of days. You ahve to go over it again and again, slowly, learning it, not worrying about the tempo. And then you can start to practice at faster speeds and do this again and again. After some days, you should have this piece down, or close to it. But never give yourself a deadline to learn something. Just review it again and again, slowly slowly always slowly, digging on the notes and the rhythms. Slowly over and over. Then do this whole thing again later, or tomorrow. You will be able to play well in a few days this way. Let me know how it goes.
     
  17. JeffBerlin

    JeffBerlin Guest

    Jan 10, 2009
    Oh, Man! I forgot about MySpace. I had better check it out.
     
  18. engedi1

    engedi1

    Sep 16, 2005
    Nashville
    Thanks Jeff. I appreciate the tips! I think what it comes down to, to be honest, is to not be lazy with the hard passages, but to really crunch down on them. I think I have tended to just blow through them without really concentrating on them like you are saying. Also, I am sure you have mentioned this somewhere, but where and when can I find your new CD? I didn't see any CD's new than 2006 on CD baby.
     
  19. southpaw76

    southpaw76

    Feb 20, 2007
    Charlotte, NC
    Hey Jeff,
    I was wondering if you had ever read or had studied any of Paul Hindemiths books, specifically "Elementary training in music"?

    I know Jaco and a lot of other Jazz guys used to study his methods and I was wondering what your take on it was?

    Thanks,
    sp
     
  20. 1000 posts in less than 20 days lol. You're pretty popular, Jeff...
     

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.