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Jeff's Thread. No Topic! Just Go for It. But, Be Nice!

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by JeffBerlin, Apr 9, 2010.


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  1. engedi1

    engedi1

    Sep 16, 2005
    Nashville
    1000 posts. Don't tell a moderator!
     
  2. JeffBerlin

    JeffBerlin Guest

    Jan 10, 2009
    It will be available next week on CDBaby, Audiophile, you know, the usual group. Actually I am quite excited about this CD. I think that it has some of the best interactive playing I did on record. Plus, my solos are pretty darned good.
     
  3. JeffBerlin

    JeffBerlin Guest

    Jan 10, 2009
    I never looked at it. Perhaps I should!
     
  4. Peter Weil

    Peter Weil Seeker of The New Supporting Member

    Mar 29, 2000
    Edinburgh, Scotland
    Hey Jeff! I'm keeping my eye on you over here in between other things...

    Cure? Um, yes. I think so...;)

    Gig last 2 weekends with a new soul/funk band. 30+ songs, wrote most of them out over the last few weeks, worked out a few on the fly, played, had fun, got paid, got asked back to do more gigs. Result.

    Jazz gigs coming up gradually over the next few months. Playing jazz every week, practicing/ear training every day. Win!

    As far as I'm concerned, great results from everything I've learned. Thanks for everything Jeff.
     
  5. JeffBerlin

    JeffBerlin Guest

    Jan 10, 2009
    It's a curse, just like my good looks! But, I guess I have to live with the fame and the gorgeous features, not to mention my 11 inch.. well, the fame and face part will have to do for now!
     
  6. JeffBerlin

    JeffBerlin Guest

    Jan 10, 2009
    You got asked back? I am not surprised! Just remember to repeat your bass lines, either one bar, two bars or four bars.

    How am I doing Pete? Do you think that things are going along OK (except for my momentary lapse in conduct yesterday)?
     
  7. southpaw76

    southpaw76

    Feb 20, 2007
    Charlotte, NC
    Well I am sure that at this point in your career you already know everything in that book. But it is a very good book non the less. It definitely makes the idea of using a metronome obsolete which is one of the reasons I brought it up.

    sp
     
  8. Lesfunk

    Lesfunk Supporting Member

    Hey Jeff, What became of your old Peavey Palaedium? Do you still play it?
    I played it a couple of times at MI in 1994 and it was the fastest, slinkiest bass I ever played.
     
  9. Peter Weil

    Peter Weil Seeker of The New Supporting Member

    Mar 29, 2000
    Edinburgh, Scotland
    Heh. The funk stuff definitely seems easier now. Repetition, learn the good riffs, listen to your bandmates closely, make the singer sound good, and hitting that groove seems to be the name of the game. It's not jazz, but you gotta do what you gotta do...and I like seeing people dance. Getting paid is also somewhat useful ;)

    Looks pretty pleasant around here now. Play nice Jeff! You said so in the thread title :p

    Right, back to practice.
     
  10. JeffBerlin

    JeffBerlin Guest

    Jan 10, 2009
    More and more people are catching on to this now. And just to add, there is no detriment to one's playing if they don't use a click. Nothing bad will happen! They simply have to rely on their inner musical sense to improve in time.
     
  11. JeffBerlin

    JeffBerlin Guest

    Jan 10, 2009
    That bass was the best and easiest bass ever built. Even my Dean Jeff Berlin is just a little bit less "race car" feeling than that Peavey (not much though). That Peavey bass reminded me of Chevy Chase in National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation sliding down the snowy hill after spraying non-stick spray on the bottom of his flying saucer.

    It is sitting in the living room of my house on a guitar stand. My son jams on that bass all the time. Frankly my Dean bass sounds better than the Peavey. But the Peavey had an awfully sweet neck.
     
  12. ... record of a rock & roll band. :bassist:

    -PE
     
  13. JeffBerlin

    JeffBerlin Guest

    Jan 10, 2009
    EXACTLY!!!!!
     
  14. southpaw76

    southpaw76

    Feb 20, 2007
    Charlotte, NC
    Exactly! The beat is always with in us. It's kind of like breathing, it's autonomous. The thing that helps me relate his method to this conversation is the ability to count out the music in different time signatures without regard to tempo, which does wonders for sight reading.

    sp
     
  15. Lesfunk

    Lesfunk Supporting Member

    That neck was super thin and those pickups could really cut.
     
  16. JeffBerlin

    JeffBerlin Guest

    Jan 10, 2009
    Some people ask how to learn how to read music. One great answer is to never use a metronome when doing it. People ask about how to learn how to play with a drummer. You won't learn how to do this with a click. Many say that they wish to gauge their playing by playing with a metronome and speed up the click. Why? People want to learn how to groove. Metronomes have nothing to do with grooves.

    The best answer to using a metronome is to subdivide the click and use it for ear training. Some guys need a drummer to play or practice with and don't have one around. A metronome is a fine substitution, even it it isn't listening to you at all. Finally, clicks are simply the most widely publicized device of all the equipment available that are popularized to help you to play better. But the publicity is as wrong as can be because to play better you have to know what you are doing better.

    Hasta manana. I am Beat! Love to all. Jeff
     
  17. Rudyboy98

    Rudyboy98

    Jan 25, 2008
    South Bay, CA
    Jeff: Thanks for answering my question about your approach to a bass line. I didn't realize you try to keep things as simple as possible! Being a self-taught player, I guess I should know better!

    Now another question: Improv. (Uh, this is not stand-up comedy I'm talking about. :D)

    I keep explaining to new bass players that improvisation is much more than spontaneous, on the spot playing. I consider it to be an art form. Thus, it is usually referred to as the ART of Improvisation. Personally, I think it means some study should be taking place to improve your playing. (Redundant perhaps, but I am not quoting a dictionary here, just my personal experience.)

    I use the example of not simply using scales or repetitive notes (such as would be the melody) but using relative notes and modes.

    For instance, I like to slow down the tempo if the song allows for it-then groove with the drummer and sometimes use a percussive approach as part of improvising. Soloing and improvising are not always the same thing to me either! I might even forget the chord progression in a song...and come up with "jazzy sound" (think diminished run) improvised over a pentatonic minor scale to make up for the difference in the notes I missed as part of the original arrangement. (It may not sound right all of the time, but it sounds better than playing the wrong notes altogether!)

    What say you Jeff? Are there more academically correct approaches to improvising, or is it more like a free-for-all with every player?
     
  18. Langueta

    Langueta Guest

    Jul 9, 2007

    When you refer to chord tones, you are also refering to the 9, 13, 11 or only to 1-3-5-7???


    Thanks Jeff. A method to develop my phrasing came to my mind after I`ve read a lot of your posts, and remembering many lessons I had with a very good upright player.

    I have a chord substition chart that my teacher gave me. I am studing the dominant chords and analising which chord is formed when I play the chord tones of the substituions. I am focusing in non diatonic substitutions cause I always played in diatonic way.

    With this method I will learn different type of dominant chords, today over C7: C7 (alt), a C7 b9 b13, C7 Lydyan, C7 #5, etc.

    In only one day my phrases improved a lot. Now I understand that the chord tones are more musical than scales. Non diatonic substitutions give other colours that sound Jazzy.

    Perhaps a good way to practise this is to play the blues in the 12 keys(I have the Aebersold book). I will tell my teacher to write some phrases over the chord tones of different dominant chords. Then I will transpose this phrases to other keys (it will also help my reading)

    It is this a good method ???
     
  19. JeffBerlin

    JeffBerlin Guest

    Jan 10, 2009
    Soloing is always learned academically; you practice at home, you study with a good teacher, you learn the notes, you play with CD's. But everything after this is much more in the art category because now you are performing.

    Soloing can be learned academically and quite easily. I do it all the time at The Players School of Music. In fact, it is guaranteed! You simply need to follow certain concepts, practice them out of time and you will improve enough to exectute simple but correct solos (this is SUPER important, to be correct in academia).
     
  20. JeffBerlin

    JeffBerlin Guest

    Jan 10, 2009
    Sure it is! It's a great method if you are getting good stuff to work on. Congratulations!

    Regarding the chord tones, I call them the 1, 3, 5, and 7! Even with tensions unless you are able to deal with the tensions, you might want to just do the chord tones themselves in different inversions and on jazz tunes, to get you to experience their simplicity and perfection on different chord types.
     

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