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Jeff's Thread. No Topic! Just Go for It. But, Be Nice!

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by JeffBerlin, Apr 9, 2010.


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  1. PiNgtime

    PiNgtime

    Mar 26, 2009
    Hey Jeff, you've stated your opinion already on slapping..... that being so, how did Five G come about? Did you just knock back a few and decide to throw all the slap fanboys for a loop?
     
  2. JeffBerlin

    JeffBerlin Guest

    Jan 10, 2009
    I am one of the earliest slappers in bass history. I was one of the pioneers of the technique and I influenced a world wide group of listenerswho didn't listen to Larry Graham or Stanley Clarke, but who did listent to Bill Bruford. I recorded on "One of a Kind" CD the track called 5G, and for a while I got famous for this recording.

    I just don't want anybody to go to a teacher to learn it. Every well known slapper in history got this technique but didn't go to school or pay a teacher to teach it to them. Every single one! This is my entire point about slapping. It makes for terrible academics to pay and learn.
     
  3. PiNgtime

    PiNgtime

    Mar 26, 2009
    Thanks for answering that. Following that -

    1) at that time weren't there other bassists in fusion who were doing slap stuff? Jonas Hellborg comes to mind. Were there no others in fusion?

    2) I've searched for your Runaway Train that you mentioned in the days gone in this thread. Can't seem to find it unfortunately. Would like to hear it sometime! My curiousity got piqued
     
  4. Langueta

    Langueta Guest

    Jul 9, 2007
    The inversions!! Thanks!
    What do you think about reading music without an instrument in your hands??? I am reading at the bus way home. It helped me to get better at rhythm, and to see how notes relate to each other. Do you teach also this way??
    Do you have a favorite chord when you improvise???I mean, you like to follow all the changes, or you see the chart and focus on some chords you like more (for example in a 2-5-1, focus on the dominant chord).
     
  5. Just my $0.02 - I do this too, just sit around sometimes tapping out syncopated rhythms from various drum books. In my own experience, it's beneficial, but not as much as having the instrument in my hands. I find there's a connection that has to be made from the second you see it on paper all the way to where your hand ends up in the right place and executes the notes that doesn't get enhanced by reading without an instrument... Which is really not so remarkable.... :) Having said that, I also find that the compliment of doing both means if my time is limited I can spend less time with the instrument in my hands having done the prior as opposed to not.

    -PE
     
  6. JeffBerlin

    JeffBerlin Guest

    Jan 10, 2009
    *
     
  7. Not in response to anything, just sharing: I'd say OT but there's really no topic anyway.

    Loosely quoting another great bassist who shares the same sort of international recognition over a very long career as does Jeff:

    ".... once you get an understanding of the academics of music it is truly a liberating experience to be able to express yourself musically, it's a love like no other I've known"

    What I love about this is the unassuming manner in which the academics is referred to as a precursor. In other words, it never even occurred to the author that anyone wishing to pursue this craft and/or express themselves musically would consider anything less than total emergence into all the knowledge to be had.
     
  8. JeffBerlin

    JeffBerlin Guest

    Jan 10, 2009
    This is an ear training method and it has lots of value. But I would only do this in short spurts if you are a new reader. Keep it simple. The exerience itself is the benefit to you. Ultimately, nothing beats reading music with an instrument in your hands.
     
  9. JeffBerlin

    JeffBerlin Guest

    Jan 10, 2009
    My feeling exactly! Well said Mr. Earth!!!!!!!
     
  10. JimmyM

    JimmyM Supporting Member

    Apr 11, 2005
    Apopka, FL
    Endorsing: Ampeg Amps, EMG Pickups
    jonas came along in the 80's. jeff came along in the 70's.
     
  11. raymondl3

    raymondl3

    Dec 10, 2007
    USA
    Hey Jeff! I am 35 and have been playing Jazz gigs on electric bass since I was about 25. One thing I have noticed is there seems to be more acceptance of electric bass in Jazz by the generation that would now be roughly between 45 and 60 years of age. A lot of guys older or younger than that seem to have more of a bias against EB. More so I think with the younger generation in my experience. I guess when you consider how many great EB players that generation produced, it's no surpise. Any thoughts?
     
  12. PiNgtime

    PiNgtime

    Mar 26, 2009
    Ah yes. Thanks. My mistake
     
  13. JeffBerlin

    JeffBerlin Guest

    Jan 10, 2009
    The real jazz purists prefer not to use the electric, but seek out the upright. To be honest, in jazz, it is a way more effective sound than the electric bass, even I recognize that. So, in fact, even though the electric is used in jazz, it really isn't that used in a great deal of jazz.
     
  14. raymondl3

    raymondl3

    Dec 10, 2007
    USA
    So it follows that you consider yourself a "Jazzer" on an instrument that is way less effective than upright bass?
     
  15. Mark Wilson

    Mark Wilson Supporting Member

    Jan 12, 2005
    Toronto, Ontario
    Endorsing Artist: Elixir® Strings
    Closed.
    Over 1,000 posts.
     

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