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Jet drill press JDP-14M I need a new chuck what should I get?

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by tjclem, Dec 12, 2015.


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  1. tjclem

    tjclem Commercial User

    Jun 6, 2004
    Central Florida
    Owner and builder Clementbass
    I have never had to replace a chuck I don't know the first thing about it. Any help advice?
     
  2. praisegig

    praisegig Supporting Member

    Jul 7, 2008
    Stephenville, TX
  3. tjclem

    tjclem Commercial User

    Jun 6, 2004
    Central Florida
    Owner and builder Clementbass
    Thanks i was hoping to buy it from Amazon. Do you see any there that will work? Thanks a lot!
     
  4. pcake

    pcake Supporting Member

    Sep 20, 2011
    Los Angeleez
    couldn't you email or call jet and ask for the specs? my husband says they're a very responsive company - he bought a lathe from them a couple months ago.

    can you read what your current chuck's capacity is? it should be written on the side of the chuck. if you can deal with 1/2", this one should work
    http://www.amazon.com/PSI-Woodworking-Products-TM32-Diameter/dp/B004CVJC20/ref=sr_1_1

    my husband says you'll need a drift pin to remove the chuck from the spindle. this one sounds good http://www.amazon.com/LFA-Reichel-Hardware-2MT-Drift/dp/B00VRT1A0W/ref=sr_1_1
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2015
  5. Bruce Johnson

    Bruce Johnson Commercial User

    Feb 4, 2011
    Fillmore, CA
    Professional Luthier
    Tom;

    Here's the complete exploded view and parts list for the Jet JDP-15M, for your general reference.
    Jet JDP-15M Parts List and Diagram - (354165) : eReplacementParts.com
    That company, EreplacementParts is a great resource for parts for tools and machines.

    Your drill press has a MT2 female socket in the spindle, which is the most common size on good machines. You can buy replacement drill chucks from many sources, from cheapo to super high quality. All that matters is that it is fitted with an MT2 ( aka 2 MT or Morse Taper 2) arbor.

    So you know, the drill chuck itself has a short female tapered socket on the back, usually a JT33, but it can be other taper sizes. The arbor is a separate part, which adapts the chuck to the drill press spindle. The arbor will typically be JT33 on the front and MT2 on the back.

    For your reference, many cheaper and smaller drill presses skip the arbor and have a male JT33 or JT3 right on the end of the spindle. It can be a little trickier to remove and replace those chucks, and you have to be sure that the chuck has the right taper to match the spindle. Generally, American made drill presses of this style will use JT33, and Asian import machines will use JT3. But you have to check. But this doesn't apply to your Jet; it has the MT2 spindle, which is a better thing.

    When you buy a drill chuck, some will come with an arbor already included and installed. Others will be the chuck alone, and you need to select and buy the arbor separately. Either way, as long as you get an MT2 arbor, it will fit your spindle.

    The MT2 style arbor and spindle socket are made to be easily disassembled and reassembled. You can have several different chucks with MT2 arbors, and quickly swap them as you need them. To take them apart, use a tapered steel tool called a "Drift", like the one pcake referenced above. You can buy one or make one from a piece of 1/4" x 1" steel bar stock. Insert the drift into the slot in the spindle, hold onto the chuck, and give the drift a light tap with a hammer. The chuck and arbor will drop right out.

    To reinstall the arbor, first wipe the tapered surface of the arbor and the inside of the spindle socket to make sure that they are clean. No chips or sawdust. Insert the arbor up into the spindle, turning it to align the tang with the slot. Push it up into place, then give it a light hammer tap upwards onto the jaws of the chuck. It should stick up in there and stay by the friction of the taper.

    About choosing drill chucks: There are keyed chucks and keyless chucks, ranging in price from $10 to $200. For a general purpose drill press, the cheap ones will usually work just fine. Many of my drill presses have cheap import chucks on them, and I've rarely had any problems with them.

    The keyless chucks, like this one, are really nice for general woodworking drilling. Fast and handy. I have several of these, on my most-used drill presses.
    http://www.amazon.com/Keyless-Drill...=8-2-spons&keywords=keyless+drill+chuck&psc=1

    If you are drilling metal, keyless chucks are a little marginal for holes above 3/8". That's where you want more clamping power from a keyed chuck, like this one.
    http://www.amazon.com/Heavy-Duty-Drill-Chuck-Arbor/dp/B00MS2RINK/ref=pd_sim_sbs_469_4?ie=UTF8&dpID=416zQgYlZfL&dpSrc=sims&preST=_AC_UL160_SR160,160_&refRID=02DXJRZ7WGZ4RPXZJP5G
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2015
    tjclem and Gilmourisgod like this.
  6. megafiddle

    megafiddle

    May 25, 2011
    ^ ^ ^ Good info and description of procedure.

    I would retract the jaws fully into the chuck before tapping the chuck into the spindle, though.

    Also, to add, do not put grease or heavy oil inside the spindle or on the taper. That will absolutely prevent the taper from sticking in place. If anything, just the thinnest film of a very light oil should be on the surface.

    -
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2015
  7. Bruce Johnson

    Bruce Johnson Commercial User

    Feb 4, 2011
    Fillmore, CA
    Professional Luthier
    I don't. It only takes a very light tap to seat an MT taper. You don't beat it in there. And the chuck jaws are hardened.

    I wipe a little bit of oil machine oil on the MT taper arbors and tools. They are made to be taken in and out thousands of times, and the oil reduces wear and corrosion. The MT taper series has a shallow enough angle that they will lock up just fine, even when oily.

    It's a different story with the JT series tapers, like on the backs of the drill chucks. Those are meant to be put together semi-permanently. You normally only take an arbor out of a chuck if the arbor is damaged and needs to be replaced. JT tapers should be put together dry. I'll usually wipe them with alcohol.
     
  8. megafiddle

    megafiddle

    May 25, 2011
    Yes, but considering how easy it is to retract the jaws, why transmit that force through the jaw gearing and adjusting collar bearing? The chuck nose, on the other hand, is solid to the arbor.

    I use a light film of light oil also, but had to wipe off all but the lightest film on the last couple that I seated in order to get them to stick.

    -
     
  9. tjclem

    tjclem Commercial User

    Jun 6, 2004
    Central Florida
    Owner and builder Clementbass
    Any thoughts on Keyless Vs. not? I don't drill metal. I use a lot of forstner bits. Thanks for all the info.
     
  10. Hopkins

    Hopkins Supporting Member Commercial User

    Nov 17, 2010
    Houston Tx
    Owner/Builder @Hopkins Guitars

    Hey Bruce,

    Is there a chart or something that has the measurements of each type of chuck and arbor? I have an old no name drill press that is a solid tool but I cannot find a parts break down on it. I would love to replace the chuck with keyless chuck.
     
  11. Bruce Johnson

    Bruce Johnson Commercial User

    Feb 4, 2011
    Fillmore, CA
    Professional Luthier
    Hey Hopkins;

    Here's one of the standard charts of machine tool tapers:
    Dimensions of Standard Tapers - LittleMachineShop.com

    If the spindle has a fairly long female socket, and there's a slot in the side of the spindle, then it's almost certainly a Morse Taper. If the swing of the drill press is around 15", it's most likely a MT2. Some little old ones are MT1. Big drill presses, 20"-24", will have MT3 or MT4.

    If there's no socket and arbor, and just a short male taper on the end of the spindle, then it's probably a Jacobs Taper (JT). If it's older American made, it's probably JT33. Import Asian machines are usually JT3, which is actually a metric size.
     
  12. Hopkins

    Hopkins Supporting Member Commercial User

    Nov 17, 2010
    Houston Tx
    Owner/Builder @Hopkins Guitars
    Thanks Bruce, much appreciated,

    When I finally get a day off from the ole day job and I can get to my shop I will take a closer look at it.
     
  13. Bruce Johnson

    Bruce Johnson Commercial User

    Feb 4, 2011
    Fillmore, CA
    Professional Luthier
    Tom;

    The two main drill presses that I have in my woodworking shop both have imported keyless chucks, like that one I pointed to on Amazon. I've had no problems using them with Forstner bits up to 2". Forstner bits in that size range generally have 3/8" shanks, and the keyless have plenty of gripping power on them.

    If you are using 3" or 4" Forstner bits, you need a keyed chuck to hold onto them. Plus, you really want to run those larger bits in a heavier machine that runs much slower. I normally only run up to 1 1/2" bits in the medium size (15") drill presses with the keyless chucks. The larger sizes I run in my 20" drill press, in a keyed chuck, at around 180 rpm.

    So, if you are only using the smaller (2" or less) sizes, I recommend the keyless chuck. It saves you so much time. You can literally change a drill bit one-handed.
     
    tjclem likes this.
  14. tjclem

    tjclem Commercial User

    Jun 6, 2004
    Central Florida
    Owner and builder Clementbass

    OK boss I will order this one. Thanks much



    http://www.amazon.com/Keyless-Drill...keyless drill chuck&psc=1&tag=viglink12772-20
     
  15. Arie X

    Arie X

    Oct 19, 2015
    you can get greater tightening power on larger drills if you use a spanner. it will fit into that larger hole on the body of the chuck.

    assembly wise, clean arbor and spindle both, (if you want, they make tapered spindle cleaners for this) no oil, and wipe down with acetone. no burrs either. stone them off if you find any. retract the jaws and fit the thing together by hand. place a block of wood under the spindle of the drill press. from about 2~3 away from the wood bring the quill down sharply to give the chuck assembly a medium "bonk" up into the spindle. this will seat the chuck.
     
  16. tjclem

    tjclem Commercial User

    Jun 6, 2004
    Central Florida
    Owner and builder Clementbass
    Thanks .
     
  17. megafiddle

    megafiddle

    May 25, 2011
    Bits for cutting relatively large diameter holes should have 3 flats milled into the end of the shank. This prevents slipping and should not require any extra chuck tightening torque.

    -
     
  18. Hopkins

    Hopkins Supporting Member Commercial User

    Nov 17, 2010
    Houston Tx
    Owner/Builder @Hopkins Guitars
    Ok, I finally got around to pulling the chuck out of my drill press. It is indeed a Morse Taper #2. Thanks again @Bruce Johnson for the information.
     
  19. tjclem

    tjclem Commercial User

    Jun 6, 2004
    Central Florida
    Owner and builder Clementbass
    The chuck worked great thanks!!
     
  20. Primary

    Primary TB Assistant

    Here are some related products that TB members are talking about. Clicking on a product will take you to TB’s partner, Primary, where you can find links to TB discussions about these products.

     
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