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Jet mini lathe

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by Rodent, Mar 9, 2008.


  1. Rodent

    Rodent A Killer Pickup Line™ Commercial User

    Dec 20, 2004
    Upper Left Corner (Seattle)
    Player-Builder-Founder: Honey Badger Pickups & Regenerate Guitar Works
    while running about during our open house yesterday, somehow one of these found its way into the back of the truck

    41ko8qOUcsL._SS500_.

    I have no arguements, since I've been wanting to utilize wooden knobs on my custom builds but have been put off by the steep price a set of four custom knobs can run. additional justification was leveraged when I decided that I'm going to need some kind of woodworking activity until I have a fully functional shop in Charlotte :D

    I can see that once I have the knob making process down regular consistent high quality, I may just be offering custom knobs as a custom order product on the new website (when it's up and running)

    all the best,

    R
     
  2. Howe

    Howe

    Feb 9, 2008
    fine lil' lathe you've got there.

    Now ya just need to cut some 1x1 stock, cut a "X" in each end grain, hammer in the mandrel spike, then line up the end guide on the end spike.

    grab your gouge do a quick round off, sand to final grade before starting the tip of the nobby.
    then take your knife and cut the dome with that, leave just enough material on the end that your nob doesn't fly off the lathe. cut off the nobby at this point.

    then you just got a lil 1/8 bit thats ugly on the end of your nob that you can take over to a disc sander buzz off then start to hand sand. Note if you cut with the knife right, you shouldn't need to sand that part of the dome on the tip of the nob
    just the little bit on the very end you'll have to sand.

    My biggest advice for any lathe user is learn how to use your knife!, once you get used to it theres no need to sand and you can do almost anything, awesome tool, just be prepared to sand after using it for the first few months intill you've got it down pat :)
     
  3. Rodent

    Rodent A Killer Pickup Line™ Commercial User

    Dec 20, 2004
    Upper Left Corner (Seattle)
    Player-Builder-Founder: Honey Badger Pickups & Regenerate Guitar Works
    thanks for the tips, H

    my brother-in-law turns bowls for a living, and he's offered to get me going with some hands-on instruction. it looks like we'll be spending a weekend at their place, and I'll be learning the craft of turning, sanding, and buffing/polishing ... at least to the point where I'll know enough to go home and practice for the coming weeks

    o - and now I know what to do with all of those highly figured cut-offs that I've previously relegated to the burn pile

    all the best,

    R
     
  4. Dirk Diggler

    Dirk Diggler Supporting Member

    Mar 3, 2004
    Anytown USA
    Man one of those is on my wish list. Have fun and it seems like the best way to make some crazy shaped knobs, also laminate a bunch of alternating woods and do that too. :)
    I'm officially jealous, have fun with it!
    Dirk
     
  5. knarleybass

    knarleybass Commercial User

    Apr 6, 2005
    Tustin, CA
    Owner of Ulyate Instruments
    I love the Mini Lathe, I made pens for friends last Christmas. I have made a few knobs as well, they turned out great.
     
  6. How much did that set you back, R?
     
  7. A better way to do it is to have something the same sized as the mandril that will be going into it. Then clamp a chuck on to it so you can do all the shaping/sanding/buffing on the lathe.

    lowsound
     
  8. I've got the Grizzly version with an adjustable chuck that'll hold stuff over 1" in diameter. I cut out the rough knob using a plug cutter on a drill press (I think Luke Sheridan does it this way as well), and do the doming and finer shaping on the lathe.

    The tip of the tailstock is also a good way to find the center for drilling out. It seems to me there must be a way to mount an actual drill bit in the tailstock and just drill out on the lathe....but I haven't found the right attachment.
     
  9. Howe

    Howe

    Feb 9, 2008
    yep, thought most mini lathe's dont come with chucks..they're pretty pricy, but if you got one it's diffiently the way to go.

    another option is drill glue a piece of 1/4 doweling into your nob hole and toss it on the drill press, then just cut/re-drill out the doweling after.

    and luck knowing a turner! theres nothing better then hands on lessons when it comes to turning it's truely a fine art :)
     
  10. Does your tailstock have a morris taper on it? If so it isn't hard at all to find a drill chuck for it. Something like this would work fine http://www.sanouchuck.com/sanou/mt31-13.asp

    I didn't realise that most mini lathes don't come with a face chuck. I have a full sized lathe. I think that if you are just turning knobs, a metal lathe would be about 5000x easier to do it on, but way too expensive.

    lowsound
     
  11. Rodent

    Rodent A Killer Pickup Line™ Commercial User

    Dec 20, 2004
    Upper Left Corner (Seattle)
    Player-Builder-Founder: Honey Badger Pickups & Regenerate Guitar Works

    new mini lathe + new stand = mid $300's

    I just love the local Jet dent-n-scratch outlet! :hyper:

    all the best,

    R
     

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