Jimmy Bones' Skully Bass (Ongoing Project)

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by Jimmy Bones, Aug 8, 2009.


  1. Jimmy Bones

    Jimmy Bones

    Feb 24, 2009
    Baxley, GA
    This is the thread designed specifically to chronicle my upcoming Skully Bass project.

    The body is a Peavey Fury, a P style body with standard P routing. It is currently a faded white.

    The ultimate design should look like the following:

    Black body, upper back corner (bottom of the body, closest to the armpit when playing) will be white, almost a splatter design, as though it was just dripped on there. In the white portion will be my 'skully face', a mock up of my occassional stage paint look.

    Simple as that. Nothing fancy, and no decisions yet on pick guard or neck or anything - we'll get to that when we get to that. :)

    Stripping begins tomorrow.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Jimmy Bones

    Jimmy Bones

    Feb 24, 2009
    Baxley, GA
    Ok, bass body is in, it isn't too bad. Guy sold it to me because he busted the neck by turning the truss too much. Got it for $50.

    IMG_1396.jpg
    IMG_1426.jpg

    Also got some Acetone, some plastic scrapers, stripping gloves, and other such things to begin the stripping process. (Following a stripping tutorial found here: http://www.projectguitar.com/tut/chem.htm )

    IMG_1427.jpg
    IMG_1467.jpg

    Been working on it a couple hours, and it's going slooooooow. If it doesn't show some real progress in the next couple hours, I am gong to forgo the acetone and pull out the heat gun and just power strip it.

    IMG_1495.jpg
    IMG_15322.jpg

    The real annoying thing though... I bought the body, then went to a guitar shop a couple hours later, found a used MIM J bass, same color and everything, for $175. If it's still there on the first, and this project seems to be going well, I may go grab it and restore it and paint it up too.

    UPDATE: Acetone wasn't working as well as that other site said it wold, so I broke out the Craftsman heat gun. The side I'd treated with the Acetone was a good deal easier to strip than the other side, but they both came off pretty good. I only went through the lacquer though, I tried not to cut through the base coat since I didn't want to burn the wood. I broke through in a couple places, but no major burnage. I restarted the acetone to seep through the base coat, and I'll be doing that all through the day, until I hit bare wood, then I'll be sanding it down.


    IMG_1655.jpg
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    IMG_1674.jpg
    IMG_1681.jpg
     
  3. xjeremiahx

    xjeremiahx

    Apr 19, 2009
    Chicago, IL
    No longer a slave to GC.
    nice confederate apron haha. anxious to see how this bass turns out
     
  4. Jimmy Bones

    Jimmy Bones

    Feb 24, 2009
    Baxley, GA
    $12 on EBAY. :p Came with a pot holder and oven mitt.

    This bass is currently just a tester, since I can't seem to find a replacement neck for it. The neck pocket dimensions are unique to Peavey, from what I can tell.
     
  5. Neck pockets aren't too hard to widen (If they are too small that is). If they are too large... then... I got nothing.
     
  6. Sharko

    Sharko

    Jun 18, 2009
    Washington, DC
    Hey Jimmy Bones, great work!
    Here's some supplies we'll need:

    So for the paint, I have the most experience with Reranch nitro lacquers, are you familiar with their website?
    You're gonna need black, duh, and clear coat to go over the whole thing. They say 1 can is enough to cover the whole body, and it's true, but I find it leaves a very thin coat, especially if you want to sand it smooth. If it were me, I would get 1 can black, 2 cans clear.
    For the primer and the white area, lets kill 2 birds with one stone: go to your hardware store and get BINS White Shellac Based Primer, 2 cans.

    You'll also need copious sandpaper, I'd say 100, 200, 400, 600, 800 grits. And a sanding block.

    For the design, we're going to need a black paint pen, something glossy, opaque. Can get them from Michaels or the hardware store probably. Should be the size of a sharpie or smaller tip.
    We'll also need Full Sheet Labels from an office supply store. You know those label sheets you stick in the printer and they're cut up into little individual stickers already? It's like that, but not pre-cut, it's just one huge 8.5 by 11 inch sticker.

    You may need Goo-Gone from the hardware store as well.

    I'll post more as it occurs to me.
     
  7. Jimmy Bones

    Jimmy Bones

    Feb 24, 2009
    Baxley, GA
    Not familiar at all with it. Last time I did any finishing, I used auto paint for my Saga brand Tele kit.
     
  8. Sharko

    Sharko

    Jun 18, 2009
    Washington, DC
    look em up at Reranch.com, they're nice stuff, really accurate colors, and they're all nitro. They also have really good instructions on their site for finishing in solids, sunbursts, metallics, and tints. They'll tell you what grit of sandpaper to use for each coat and everything.
    About $12 per can I think and really fast and secure shipping.
     
  9. Jimmy Bones

    Jimmy Bones

    Feb 24, 2009
    Baxley, GA
    I found them after you mentioned them and posted an edit, guess it didn't stick.

    It's a shame they don't have the shade of green I want. I already have plans for that Fender I found at the shop a couple days ago, and it requires a bright shamrock green.
     
  10. your idol

    your idol

    Oct 13, 2008
    Murfreesboro TN
    i see everyone on this site uses chemicals to stip a bass.. i always used orbital sanders for the bulk and hand sanding for the rest..i always end up (mind you with great care) getting a nice bare wood grain and a smooth even finish and it typically dosent take that much effort. also,past the point of priming, have used automotive finishes and have treated them just like a car as well. ive always had awesome pro looking results..the finish just ends up seeming a lil more fragile. thanks for posting all of this so i can see someone learning to do it the apperent right way! i will also learn from your experience
     
  11. Jimmy Bones

    Jimmy Bones

    Feb 24, 2009
    Baxley, GA
    Well, truth be told, the stripping is all an experiment on my part, based on what I've read online and seen my buddy (a gui****) do in my back yard.

    I also have an orbital sander, but I haven't bothered to try it yet. Wanted to try the chemical way since neither me nor my buddy had tried it yet. My heat gun experience was actually a billion times better than his was. He burnt the body, burnt himself, and ended up having to work around changes in the porosity of his wood. Turned out cool, but wasn't easy.
     
  12. your idol

    your idol

    Oct 13, 2008
    Murfreesboro TN
    id like to try chem on my upcoming bass project and then finish initial smoothing with an orbital (save some sand paper) no heat gun for me...the stripping isnt my forte its the final pain and wetsand and buff where i excell (former autobody worker) you said you used auto paint on a prior project so im dying to know what the finishing difference is between auto and nitro
     
  13. Tama

    Tama

    Nov 19, 2008
    Bugtussle
    Kool....looks like a lot of fun Jimmy !!!

    Maybe when I get more into the bass...I'll try a project myself. I have a friend who does fantastic air brush, painting, signs etc.
    Her work, in my opinion, is as good as anyones out there.
    I think it would be really kool to have a custom painted bass. Think so?
    Dave
     
  14. Jimmy Bones

    Jimmy Bones

    Feb 24, 2009
    Baxley, GA
    Well, this is just for fun, I don't expect it to come out any more professionally than my telecaster did.

    On that one, I did Jaguar teal (NFL, 95 era, where it was more blue than green) with metal flake on the face, and black on the sides and back.

    If the kit itself weren't such a POS (the guitar barely works), I might refinish it.

    It turned out OK, but I don't think it's really presentable. Gave it to my son to play with.
     
  15. Jimmy Bones

    Jimmy Bones

    Feb 24, 2009
    Baxley, GA
    Alrighty, bit of an update.

    Acetone has proven to be too weak to get rid of the finish in all stages. It weakened it a bit for when I used other methods, but it was more or less a waste of money. Oh well.

    Yesterday saw a couple hours of sanding, using the orbital and a wood block. Still not completely done, but there are only small spots of base coat left. Taking my time on it since it'll be a good while before I get any paint supplies in.

    Gonna try to find me the sheet labels this evening.
     
  16. Jimmy Bones

    Jimmy Bones

    Feb 24, 2009
    Baxley, GA
    Ok, sanding has proven tough, gotten to the bare wood and sealer level, except in the horn area. Gonna go dremel sanding in there later today.

    My neck came in today. Hideous ugly thing, headstock is all sorts of funky. Got it on EBAY here: http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=270439367857

    It fits the neck pocket ok, except that the heel is rounded, and the pocket is squared. We'll see if the holes line up later. Found my sheet label, still haven't ordered my paint yet, kinda broke now. :p
     
  17. Sharko

    Sharko

    Jun 18, 2009
    Washington, DC
    Hey Jimmy Bones, any progress?
     
  18. Jimmy Bones

    Jimmy Bones

    Feb 24, 2009
    Baxley, GA
    Yessir. Body is ready for a reseal, picked up my sealer today, gonna coat it up tomorrow. Woulda done it last week, but the humidity from the hurricane offshore was way too bad.

    Gonna begin with paint and such on a little over a week, once I get my paints and your input and all that. After the finish is done, assembling it all depends on when I have money for parts.
     
  19. Sharko

    Sharko

    Jun 18, 2009
    Washington, DC
    Great, so after you seal it, sand it with something like 200 to 400 grit until it is all matte. I've found sanding by hand from this point on to be much better that using the power tools. If you sand through anywhere, add another coat of sealer and repeat.

    When that's done, we can start painting.
    First, spray the whole thing with the BINS Shellac Based Primer (white). It is really runny, so try not to spray too close or too thick. If you do get runs, don't worry, the primer is going to be think and we'll sand it smooth.
    Do a couple coats at a time, use up the whole can.

    Give it a few days to dry, use 400 grit and lots of water to wet-sand it until it is smooth. The 400 is good for sanding out the runs.

    Some areas are bound to sand through, so use the second can of BINS to repeat.

    Sand again with 400, or use something finer if you don't have runs to get out. I think I used 600 here.
     
  20. KramerBassFan

    KramerBassFan

    Jan 3, 2009
    Subscribed! :D
    Keep the pictures coming.
    Really interesting project, and its helpful for a potential project i'm doing.
     
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