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Joe's Avenue - Wynton Kelly (Sheet music)

Discussion in 'Music [DB]' started by Gregmak, Dec 8, 2011.


  1. Gregmak

    Gregmak

    Oct 1, 2009
    Larnaca, Cyprus
    Hi guys,

    I'm looking for Joe's Avenue - Wynton Kelly - sheet music. Does anyone have any idea where I can find it? Or if anyone has it to upload it for me please?

    I really want to transcribe Paul Chambers' walking lines in that piece, but without knowing the chords it's kind of hard.

    Any help appreciated!
    Thanks,

    Greg
     
  2. Hi Greg,
    Neither is really that hard.... You can transcribe the chords by listening to beat one of each new chord change. The bass player in most cases is playing the root.
    Walking lines are pretty much quarter notes...sing them,write them down, play them. It will help show you the changes...
    I listened to the track a bit this morning. I will give you a short cut which will help. It's a 12 bar blues in Bb. They play a couple chorus's w. a 2 feel then do a pedal point interlude which they only do once in the tune [ I didn't listen to the whole track ] and then into the piano solo which is when the bass starts walking.
    Now its time to start transcribing...Good Luck.
     
  3. Gregmak

    Gregmak

    Oct 1, 2009
    Larnaca, Cyprus
    Hi Mark! Thanks a lot, that really helps! I will get to work now, thanks again :)
     
  4. By the way I listened to the whole track today and after 2 chorus's of blues they play that interlude till they play the head again [2 beat]. Must be part of the form....
     
  5. Gregmak

    Gregmak

    Oct 1, 2009
    Larnaca, Cyprus
    Isn't that like a shout chorus?
     
  6. You could call it that... I call it an interlude section. It gets played as part of the arrangement, in other words its planned...The bass is a pedal point. What is the chord Wynton plays there ? I'll get back to you w. the answer after you take a stab at it....
     
  7. Gregmak

    Gregmak

    Oct 1, 2009
    Larnaca, Cyprus
    Alright Mark, thanks a lot for the help buddy :)
     
  8. Brent Nussey

    Brent Nussey

    Jun 27, 2001
    Tokyo, Japan
    OK, we should clear a few things up here. This tune is what's usually called a "blues with a bridge". The form is AABA, with the a sections being blues, and the bridge being some sort of 8 bar bridge. Another example of this kind of tune is Sam Jones' Unit 7. Cannonball Adderley recorded this tune as Scotch & Water with the tune's actual composer, Joe Zawinul. Why Wynton took the composer credit but used Zawinul's name for the title must be an interesting story (Joe's Avenue is actually a good representation of the real pronuciation of Zawinul's name, especially by Cannonball).

    A shout chorus is an alternate, usually high energy, melody over the regular form of the song. That's not what this is. An interlude is a small section of music outside the form of the tune, again, this is the tune's bridge. It does sound a little like what some people might use for an interlude, but that's not it's function in this tune.

    I think it's a mistake to think you need the chords to transcribe the bass line. Often the bass line will help you to hear what the chords are. The bass line is just single notes, so it's a good place to start.

    There's only one chord in the bridge. What's the root?

    Brent
     
  9. Gregmak

    Gregmak

    Oct 1, 2009
    Larnaca, Cyprus
    Hi Brent, thanks for the info. I was busy with work these days so couldn't play. But I will listen and play it tomorrow and tell you that chord!

    It's actually the first time I come across with this "blues with a bridge" tune. And I really like this one. I'll get back to you tomorrow.

    Thanks!
     
  10. Thanks for the clarification.... Terms are terms... the bridge on this is actually 4 bars.... Common blues w. bridge that I remember would be Lester Young's " DB Blues" which has an 8 bar bridge like rhythm changes.
     
  11. Brent Nussey

    Brent Nussey

    Jun 27, 2001
    Tokyo, Japan
    I'm not sure where you get 4 bars, but there are unquestionably 8. There are arguably 4 2-bar phrases, but no doubt 8 bars.

    Terms may be just terms, but when discussing something here, they're all we have, so if they have clear meanings, we should make sure we all know what they are. That's all I was trying to do.

    Brent
     
  12. I stand corrected...Thanks.
     

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