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Joseph Patrick Moore: Feature Interview

Discussion in 'Features' started by TalkBass, Mar 23, 2004.


  1. TalkBass

    TalkBass News Poster

    Mar 12, 2004
    Intelligent, knowledgeable, and multi-talented, Joseph Patrick Moore is an accomplished bass solo artist, studio musician and band member.
     
  2. TalkBass

    TalkBass News Poster

    Mar 12, 2004
    <p align="center"><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="5"><b>Joseph
    Patrick Moore </b></font></p>
    <p align="center"><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2"><i>Interview
    by <a href="mailto:jasonjbundy@hotmail.com">Jason J. Bundy </a></i></font></p>
    <p><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2"><img src="../images/jpm1.jpg" width="251" height="180" align="left">Intelligent,
    knowledgeable, and multi-talented, Joseph Patrick Moore is an accomplished
    bass solo artist, studio musician and band member. These are but a few
    of the apparent qualities to describe one of the up and coming talents
    taking the bass into the 21st century. </font></p>
    <p><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2"><b>J.J.B.:
    Before learning to play the bass you first learned to play alto saxophone,
    then drums and then bass. How has learning different instruments shaped
    your bass playing?</b> </font></p>
    <p><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2"><b>J.P.M.:</b>
    Let me answer this question in three part's: First, the most obvious would
    be the saxophone harmonically and the drums rhythmically. Second, I would
    say that it helped me to learn how to adapt in a musical and social situation.
    I'm a product of music education. I played saxophone from fourth grade
    through tenth, the drums throughout high school and I started playing
    the bass in my junior year. During these years I had to learn to read
    music, learn to follow a conductor, learn to play in unison or within
    a section, perform in an ensemble, learn to listen, you know...the fundamental's.
    Of course all of this carries over to the bass as well. Third, the type
    of instrument really shouldn't matter. The instrument is just an extension
    of an idea or musical thought. Music is a universal language and the instrument
    is just a way to express those ideas, a tool in which to communicate.
    For me the bass is that instrument. I believe it took playing the sax
    and drums to fully understand and appreciate that. So looking back at
    it, the saxophone and drums were very fundamental in my development. </font></p>
    <p><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2"><b>J.J.B.:
    What challenges do you face when switching from a fretless 4 string to
    a fretted 5 string and then to upright?</b> </font></p>
    <p><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2"><b><img src="../images/jpm2.jpg" width="186" height="280" align="left">J.P.M.:</b>
    It's a mindset. When I play upright bass I sometimes tend to attack the
    instrument. I approach the instrument more aggressively, really pulling
    the strings and diggin' in. I try to get the sound from my hands rather
    than relying on electronics. The upright is more of a physical and demanding
    instrument, less forgiving if you will. When I switch to the electric
    bass, I try to have a more relaxed approach, the strings are closer to
    the fingerboard and I rely more on the electronics and pickups to do the
    work. Lately, I am learning to relax more on the upright, especially as
    I get older and my hands are becoming a bit more sensitive with age. I
    just recently started using a Zeta Fusion Upright Bass (which I endorse).
    It allows me to relax, while retaining that upright sound. It responds
    well and there are less dead spots than on my true upright. When switching
    from bass to bass, my biggest challenge is to maintain a since of relaxed
    intensity in my playing. </font></p>
    <p><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2"><b>J.J.B.:</b>
    Who inspired you to learn the electric bass? Upright? </font></p>
    <p><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2"><b>J.P.M.:</b>
    I studied the electric and then upright from bass guru Rusty Holloway
    in Knoxville, TN. Most of the fundamental's that I learned on the instrument,
    I owe to him. When I moved to Memphis, I studied with Scott Reed and Tim
    Goodwin. Those three cat's helped to inspire me. Donald Brown, Jerry Coker,
    as well as other teacher's, friend's, musician's, artist's that I came
    in contact with also played a big role. </font></p>
    <p><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2"><b>J.J.B.:
    What types of music or artists do you derive inspiration from? </b></font></p>
    <p><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2"><b>J.P.M.:</b>
    At the top of the list is Miles Davis! He is the one cat who constantly
    challenged himself as well as his audience. His music constantly evolved
    and he was always pushing the envelope. He had longevity and to me that
    is what it's all about. In terms of Bassist's, there are just so many
    that I can't even begin to name all of them but a few are Paul Chambers,
    Ray Brown, Ron Carter, James Jamerson, Jaco, Stanley, Marcus Miller, mmm...the
    list continues. I listen to so many people other than just bass player's,
    that inspiration is really never ending. Honestly, you know it doesn't
    even have to be a musical artist to inspire me. It can be a thought, a
    theme, a movement, a word, a painting, whatever. I usually don't have
    problems staying inspired, for me it's about focusing my energy and doing
    the right thing. </font></p>
    <p><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2"><b>J.J.B.:
    How has promoting yourself and your music via the internet helped your
    career as a bass player? </b></font></p>
    <p><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2"><b><img src="../images/jpm5string.gif" width="178" height="138" align="left">J.P.M.:</b>
    For me, the internet has helped in areas of distribution and advertising
    more than anything else. I am able to share my music with anyone who stumbles
    upon its page's. That's a powerful tool! The internet is one of the most
    amazing inventions/creations that we have ever seen. I believe we can't
    even quite comprehend the magnitude of what's going down right now. It's
    moving so fast, it's hard to keep up. Gil Scott Heron said, "The Revolution
    will not be Televised". He was right! The revolution has been computerized!
    It has brought a new meaning to "power to the people". It has opened the
    floodgates of opportunity for people around the globe. However, I actually
    hate the idea of promoting. I don't feel comfortable with it to tell you
    the truth, probably never will. When it comes to promoting, I just try
    to stay true to my life, myself and my music. We live in a society that
    demands hype over substance, full of tricks and gimmicks. Just look at
    the recent Republican Convention. It was a carefully scripted, well produced
    Hollywood movie... a total scam! All that I want to do is try to evolve
    as a human being and artist, using the internet to share common interests
    with like minded folks. Ultimately, the internet has helped my career
    in that regard. </font></p>
    <p><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2"><b>J.J.B.:
    What is your practice regimen like? </b></font></p>
    <p><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2"><b>J.P.M.:</b>
    My practice regimen is always evolving. Right now for where I am at, my
    main focus is learning tunes, melodies, transcribing, etc. Whether your
    a jazz, classical, or rock musician, you have to have repertoire! Of course
    it also helps in composing your own music too, because you have a well
    of ideas and inspiration to draw from. I'm really trying to focus on those
    objectives at this point in my practice life. Sometimes I will stumble
    on an idea or will isolate a lick or pattern and really try to get inside
    that. All in all, it's about creating melodies, tension/release and phrasing!
    That's what I'm really trying to get inside of now. </font></p>
    <p><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2"><b>J.J.B.:
    On your solo recordings, do you have the different instrument parts prearranged
    or do you work on the arrangements in a band context? </b></font></p>
    <p><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2"><b>J.P.M.:</b>
    A little of both. I always try to keep the element of improvisation in
    my music as much as possible. I like the magic that can sometimes occur.
    However, I don't like to waste time, especially in a studio situation.
    I try to take out as much of the guess work as possible. I'll usually
    have the overall form prearranged, filling in the beginning and end of
    the tune, while leaving the middle section or development section truly
    that... When I hire someone, especially in a studio environment, I try
    to give them freedom so that there voice can shine through and that it
    doesn't end up being over produced. It's ultimately about a "Controlled
    Freedom". Learning how to work within parameters or within a given box
    and style. </font></p>
    <p><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2"><b>J.J.B.:
    What limitations do you experience in being a solo artist and as a team
    player in your band, Art of Living Ensemble? </b></font></p>
    <p><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2"><b>J.P.M.:</b>
    The last two records, the focus was more on composition. I made a conscience
    effort to try to write a nice melody and set of changes than some whacked
    out bass attack/extravaganza. The focus wasn't always on the bass solo,
    it was about being a team player and playing a supporting role, letting
    other instruments take the lead or spotlight when necessary. Sometimes
    I hate bass solos if the intention is wrong or if it's predictable (Head,
    horn solo, piano solo, bass solo, drums, head out = predictable/boring).
    I have been able to stay alive in this business because I understand that.
    Do you want space or simplicity? I can give that to you. Do you want something
    a little more busy or fusionisque? I can supply that as well. To me it's
    about the tune and what the melody dictates, not the ego! However, right
    now in A.O.L.E., the focus is more on the bass. It is about balance, I
    guess that's the true Libra in me, an acrobat if you will... </font></p>
    <p><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2"><b>J.J.B.:
    What can we expect from your new solo release, Soulcloud? </b></font></p>
    <p><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2"><b>J.P.M.:</b>
    Looking back on my first recording (Never Never Land), I felt as though
    I over produced it in many ways (one of my many lessons). I also did a
    lot of midi programming and I really wanted to avoid both of these issues
    more than anything on Soulcloud. Soulcloud is a little looser, has more
    of a live feel, a more cohesive flow from beginning to end both stylistically
    and playing wise than my first recording. I made most of this record while
    working with Col. Bruce Hampton. Of course some of that rubbed off on
    those session's. It's a little reminiscent of the Fiji Mariners period,
    but with more of the focus on horns. There are some good moments in terms
    of the musicianship. Jimmy Herring plays guitar on most of it. He is truly
    an amazing artist! I was very honored to have had the opportunity to work
    with him and was very grateful to him as well as other featured guest's
    and friend's that appeared on this project. I always like to have an element
    of excitement and surprise in my music. It has to have a possibility of
    collapse and failure. Sometimes it works and sometimes it doesn't. But
    there in-lies the beauty... I like to take chances, you know. You can't
    steal second base, while leaving your foot on first. Life is full of choices
    and risk, and I think music should reflect that as well. Unfortunately
    for me, because of this, record labels and some radio station's can't
    always find the appropriate audience to target my music to. It's not some
    nice fluffed out smooth jazz nor is it traditional straight-ahead. It
    doesn't necessarily easily fit into anyone box or genre. I guess Soulcloud
    is a little mixture of both with elements of jam based moments in between.
    </font></p>
    <p><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2"><b>J.J.B.:
    You have had experience working in theater, any plans to revisit that
    environment or style of playing?</b> </font></p>
    <p><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="2"><b>J.P.M.:</b>
    Theater in terms of play's, Broadway show's, pit/orchestra musician? If
    that's what you mean, the answer is no. To me it's just that, work! I
    respect people who do that. It takes a strong discipline and focus to
    do that night after night, but I'm just not interested in that. I did
    some of that while living in Memphis, primarily because I had to pay the
    rent and I could read. As a working musician you don't always have the
    luxury of that "choice gig". Sometimes you have to take whatever you can
    in order to survive and stay active playing. </font></p>