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Just took my first lesson..,,,

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by baddarryl, Jul 8, 2019.


  1. baddarryl

    baddarryl Supporting Member

    Oct 26, 2008
    Cape Fear!
    .....in several years. I learned how to play by ear and by tab. In later years it has been YouTube. I can play ODell or Leon Wilkinson lines, but I have no idea how they create them. Good walking bassists mystify me. I have dibble dabbled over the years, but never worked on it. I have bought books and paid for subscriptions galore. Most I never complete because I am always learning covers or the field is so vast I don’t know what to focus on. I have also never stuck with a teacher. Yes I can play, but the goal? Build killer bass lines on the fly. That’s what I told him. I need someone to guide me in what to focus on. More will be revealed!
     
    Last edited: Jul 9, 2019
    IamGroot likes this.
  2. Fred Pucci

    Fred Pucci

    May 2, 2019
    Until you have a good understanding of Music Theory, you will never advance to the point of creating your own basslines (killer or otherwise). It helps make sense of what might seem like randomness.
    Nothing mysterious about walking basslines. Basically, you just use chord tones and scale notes to get you from one chord to the next. Example: In a simple 4bar progression like C-Am7-Dm7-G7, you could play quarter notes like this: C-E-F-G/A-G-E-C/D-D-E-F/G-F-G-B/ C. Once you understand scales and chord tones, you know what “works” and can draw on them to create lines that you hear in your head.
    The other thing that will help is to analyze the basslines you are playing now in terms of theory to see how they used chord/scale tones. You’ll start to see the commonalities that you can use to start creating your own lines. Good luck!
     
    MonetBass and Spin Doctor like this.
  3. baddarryl

    baddarryl Supporting Member

    Oct 26, 2008
    Cape Fear!
    That is pretty much exactly what he told me as well. Also introduced to the Nashville Number System.
     
    Fred Pucci likes this.
  4. Fred Pucci

    Fred Pucci

    May 2, 2019
    Patience and time (and sticking with lessons) will get you there.
     
  5. Leon W. is worth studying for great syncopation ideas.

    Or is that Mr. King?
     
  6. baddarryl

    baddarryl Supporting Member

    Oct 26, 2008
    Cape Fear!
    ? King ? No.
     
  7. Scottgun

    Scottgun

    Jan 24, 2004
    South Carolina
    You mentioned learning by tab, but not whether you learned to read standard notation. If you haven't, start there.
     
  8. baddarryl

    baddarryl Supporting Member

    Oct 26, 2008
    Cape Fear!
    I learned Treble Clef as a kid playing sax in middle school so I understand how to count key signs etc but Bass Cleff still throws me off. It is not as natural to me.
     
  9. Scottgun

    Scottgun

    Jan 24, 2004
    South Carolina
    It's a pain, but you are not alone. Jaco was already a killer player when he realized he had to back and learn to read. He hated it, but the bass playing world is grateful that he did.

    For recommendations, I really like Stagnaro's Latin Bass Book. Even if you don't care about Latin jazz, if you take the time to master each exercise, at the end of it you will be a killer reader, have confident fingerboard knowledge, and a great ear for harmony.
     
  10. baddarryl

    baddarryl Supporting Member

    Oct 26, 2008
    Cape Fear!
    Cool thanks. That’s the reason I got a teacher though. I have a dozen books that I never seem to complete. I will bring your suggestions to him and see what he says. I love most Jazz so yeah open to it!
     
  11. Direct Box Rox

    Direct Box Rox Silence = Deaf

    Feb 12, 2012
    USA
    You're story sounds like a duplicate of mine! Everything you said, I echo.
     
    baddarryl likes this.
  12. BassChuck

    BassChuck Supporting Member

    Nov 15, 2005
    Cincinnati
    As far as music theory goes, you should learn as much as you can. It will help you learn about music by showing you how people have designed the sounds to make music that other people enjoy. It's a very important and essential step in being a total and well rounded musician.
    That said, the only way it will help you create new music is to show you what has already been done. To be creative (IMHO) you need to listen to every kind of music you can find, and then work to apply what you heard to the music you want to create, or to your bass playing. Music theory will help you digest this, but the next step is yours alone, and a result of your perceptions, experience and outlook.
     
    baddarryl likes this.

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