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Just wonderin what you guys think about this...

Discussion in 'Jazz Technique [DB]' started by TarHeel31533, May 14, 2003.


  1. I have two friends that like to play my upright now and again. One plays guitar, the other EB. They both use their third finger like they would on their respective instruments. This, besides looking weird, seem to me like putting unesescarry stress on your fingers as well as possibly contributing to intonation problems. Anyone want to comment on this?
     
  2. olivier

    olivier

    Dec 17, 1999
    Paris, France
    You got it wrong, three finger left hand technique is IN !
     
  3. Really? Seems weird to me, I mean I use third finger on my EB, but I guess it's because I started playing DB first that it seems weird.
     
  4. olivier

    olivier

    Dec 17, 1999
    Paris, France
    Disclaimer: my chops aren't that great, I let my fingers do the walking.

    But when I look at jazz bassists playing around me, like Patrick Caratini or Gary Brunton, I see lotsa three finger left hand technique going on. I've red somewhere (here ?) that Dave Holland does it and Alexosaurus told me that Micheal Moore is a believer. So, you should try to learn from your friends, my friend.
     
  5. You got it right on, Cartwheel.

    BTW, I saw Dave Holland a couple of weeks ago, his technique looked pretty normal.
     
  6. Samie

    Samie

    Dec 13, 2000
    Madrid, Spain
    ???

    What is the usual technique? two finger???
     
  7. Alex Scott

    Alex Scott

    May 8, 2002
    Austin, TX
    you can use all four if you don't let it stress out your hand, pivoting on your thumb.
     
  8. Do you all think there is an advantage one way or the other?
     
  9. Alex Scott

    Alex Scott

    May 8, 2002
    Austin, TX
    no, just differences, I guess you can use whatever floats your boat, I don't use #3 until I get up higher, but usually I can play what I want without it.

    sometimes, though, I just get the urge to use it.
    I think if I practiced it, I would use it more.
     
  10. I don't know I guess it only seems natural for me to use just 1,2, and 4, though I do use 3 when I get into thumb position.
     
  11. olivier

    olivier

    Dec 17, 1999
    Paris, France
    Oops ! I misred your post, TarMeal: I thought you were speaking of RIGHT hand technique. Note that I answered about the left hand... to further confuse things. My apologies.:meh:

    So you, Special K and the others are correct: the conventional way is to use left hand fingers 1, 2 & 4 in the lower register.
     
  12. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    NHOP's right-hand technique is to use 3 fingers all the time and it looked like 4 occasionally, but it was difficult to tell - he was so fast! ;)
     
  13. olivier

    olivier

    Dec 17, 1999
    Paris, France
    Thanks Bruce for the helping hand ;) .

    Here is where I thought this thread was going:

    Indeed RIGHT hand technique commonly uses 2 fingers but as Bruce says 3 or 4 finger playing is seen often enough. And...

    ...when I look at jazz bassists playing around me, like Patrick Caratini or Gary Brunton, I see lotsa three finger RIGHT hand technique going on. I've red somewhere (here ?) that Dave Holland does it and Alexosaurus told me that Micheal Moore is a believer. So, you (we, I) should try to learn from your friends, my friend.

    Any of you guys know of method books describing this approach and more generally RIGHT HAND PIZZ TECHNIQUE ?
     
  14. I thought NHOP when I first read the post so yes I was also thinking right hand.

    I have been trying to use a standard BG method once I get to the E on the A.
    I.e. from the A string to the G String.
    2,4
    1,2,4
    1,3,4
     
  15. When I first leaned to play, I taught myself a lot of technique and having come from cello I used my third finder a lot. Then I started studying with classical teachers and they all told me that it was bad, wrong, perverted, etc... Finally I came to the realization that it doesn't matter. I mean, sure study all the different techniques and learn to use them, but if using your third findger sounds good and makes things easier for you, who cares?
     
  16. Dondi

    Dondi

    May 3, 2003
    NYC
    In general, most people's left hands cannot play the wider positions in tune without shifting in what should be a single position. Additionaly, our third finger is the weakest in the hand, NOT the little finger, as many folks think. It has the least muscles that are independent of the other fingers. Try this little test: place your hand totally flat on a table. Then, slowly raise each finger one at a time, without letting any other fingers move at all. When you get to the ring finger you will see that you can hardly raise it at all if you keep the others still.
    Your third finger is bigger than the pinky, but its not as strong, since its muscles are mostly connected with the second and forth fingers.
    Once you get near the thumb position, the third finger works much better, and the pinky is less usefull.
     
  17. Thats cool, I hear what you're saying. But, even if the third finger is the weakest, I don't think that's any reason to not use it. And I'm not saying to replace the pinky finger, but in addition to it. I guess my point is that you should use whatever technique works best for you, and not hesitate to do something because other people think it's wrong. If you practice using all of your fingers in every position, you can't help but open yourself up to new fingering possibilties that might be just the trick for whatever happens to come up that you want to play. Why limit yourself?
     
  18. Dondi

    Dondi

    May 3, 2003
    NYC
    I just want to put forth the concept that for MOST of us that don't have large enough hands to comfortably play in tune in the first few positions. Its much better for good intonation when the "1,2,4" fingering is used. If your hand is big enough to be in tune when in the first position, beautiful. However, in my years of playing and teaching I haven't found that many players that fit into that plan. "1,2,3,4" fingering is the exception, not the rule.