Dismiss Notice

Psst... Ready to join TalkBass and start posting, make new friends, sell your gear, and more?  Register your free account in 30 seconds.

Juzek bass

Discussion in 'Basses [DB]' started by matt essay, Sep 15, 2003.


  1. matt essay

    matt essay

    Dec 28, 2002
    Healdsburg CA
    Well,

    I know ron carter and Christian mcbride use them. I want to get a DB with a deep rich tone and will be willing to spend around $5500. Can anyone give me any advise with their experience with them. I want to get into upright but get a pretty good starter bass. My bass teacher (who does electric/acoustic) has a Pollman bass that sounds huge. I dont want something quite like that so i felt that a juzek(an older one) might give me a rich deep jazzy tone.

    Thanks
     
  2. olivier

    olivier

    Dec 17, 1999
    Paris, France
    Matt: you sound like the perfect pray for crooks. You don't know much, but you're willing to spend 5k+ on something you're not sure what to think about!

    Read the Newbie links (several times if necessary).
    Get a decent student bass, 2k should make it.
    Practice the DB untill you're able to pull out that huge sound. Then your dream will become true.
     
  3. Monte

    Monte

    Jan 9, 2001
    New Albany, MS
    You can't buy double basses solely on name. The Juzek I used to have kicked the butt of most better "name" basses. Then I've played some Juzeks that didn't sound as good as a well set-up Christopher which sells for half the price.

    Heck, I've played more Pollman's that I hated than liked, but every now and then you get one that is awesome (like Pattitucci's).

    Lesson being; play them and decide on sound. In that price range, label doesn't mean anything.

    If I had bought on name, I would have missed out on the bass I have now and love. It is a Solano 4/4 Klotz copy. When my teacher asked me to go check out some Solano basses at OU, I almost said no because I had played a few and not been real impressed. Would have been my loss to miss out on this bass that I love more every day I play it; all because I was basing my opinion on some earlier student models he made.

    Find one that you like the sound, like the way it plays, and is determined to be in good shape by a luthier and you will be happy.

    Monte
     
  4. Sam Sherry

    Sam Sherry Inadvertent Microtonalist Supporting Member

    Sep 26, 2001
    Portland, ME
    Euphonic Audio "Player"
    Christian McBride's bass looks like ****. The f-hole wings don't line up. There are big scrapes on the bouts. The heel looks like Louie at the Juzek factory went to lunch halfway through carving it and the boss said, "Just ship it." But Mr. McBride does make it sound rather nice, doesn't he?

    The point, well-made by Monte: It's about the sound. Play first. Get luthier-approval second. Read the label later.
     
  5. matt essay

    matt essay

    Dec 28, 2002
    Healdsburg CA
    Yeesh....

    You guys are harsh. But of course i would never buy a double bass without playing it our without letting a luthier check it out to make sure everythings good. But i have heard a lot of good things about juzek basses(Not because christian or ron play them its just i've read many good things about them). What do you think is the best bass you've played in that price range.
     
  6. kip

    kip

    Sep 11, 2002
    Sausalito, Ca
    aaaarrghhhh!
     
  7. Marcus Johnson

    Marcus Johnson

    Nov 28, 2001
    Maui
    Matt, you shoulda checked in here when Ed was still around, if you think that was harsh.
    Listen to these guys, they're trying to help you. You can't do a Juzek shootout over the internet. You CAN get the basic knowledge to help you to know what to look for and what to avoid. Otherwise, caveat emptor.
     
  8. kip

    kip

    Sep 11, 2002
    Sausalito, Ca
    yea harsh, and no where as critical, or informative as an Ed F reply.

    My intent was to foster further advise.

    Matt, Christian and RC could play fence wire nailed to a log and make it sing. The replies you are getting are from pro's who are trying to help. Keep your ears open.
     
  9. Perhaps a little history lesson is in order. When I started my first shop in the late 1960's there were 3 major importers of string instruments in the US. They were Scherl & Roth, Wm. Lewis & Sons, and Metropolitan Music (Juzek). Each of them sold a range of instruments targeted for beginners up to "professional" quality. The great majority of the instruments sold were the lower end instruments which were, for the most part, the product of European cottage industry factories. Typically, there were workers who made just one part of the instrument in their homes and then once a week or so he would take his particular parts to a building where the instuments were assembled. He might have made nothing but necks. Someone else made nothing but tops and so forth. When all of these parts had been assembled into an instrument they were given the label of the particular import wholesaler (i.e. Juzek, Wm. Lewis or Roth). For the most part, these instruments were sturdy, but nothing exceptional. Occationally, more by pure luck than anything else, some of these bundles of assembled parts sound quite good. If you happen to acquire one of these "lucky" instruments, you may get one that is equal (sound wise) to one of the importers top of the line which were usually priced at 3 to 4 times the cost of the average instrument (but were really made as one instrument from beginning to end). Each importer had a signature label for these top of the line instruments. For Scherl & Roth it was Earnst Heinrich Roth. Metropolitan (Juzek) had their own as did Lewis. Very few of the top of the line models were sold and are seldom seen on the open market. Most of the older Roth, Lewis and Juzek basses are more than adequate for the average player. Some are really good, but most are no better than any other brand you see on the market. As several other have already stated - buy how an instrument sounds and plays, not what it says on the label.
     
  10. godoze

    godoze

    Oct 21, 2002
    I had a "good"Juzek. It played very well but I sold it and am now looking for more fertile ground.
     
  11. Marcus Johnson

    Marcus Johnson

    Nov 28, 2001
    Maui
    Also noticed that you're in Healdsburg, kind of a mecca for luthiers. That could prove to be helpful when it's time to shop.
     
  12. ole Jason

    ole Jason Supporting Member

    Apr 3, 2003
    Louisville, KY
    While certainly not the best bass I have ever heard or played the Juzek I use is more than adequate for orchestral and solo playing when big volume isn't a huge issue. By and large I think they are regarded as good instruments but if I were you I would just go to shops and play every bass I could get my hands on. You'll find one that fits your idea of a good sound and will feel right in your hands.
     
  13. olivier

    olivier

    Dec 17, 1999
    Paris, France
    Matt: the point is to help you and other lurkers. We think you take the wrong angle. We don't think you really need a vintage bass, but you can still get one if you want to. Right now you need a learning bass, and soon enough this bass should become a gigging bass. That means well setup, easy to amplify and trouble free. Such a bass can be found without too much trouble except if you want it to be a Juzek: then your choice starts to be very limited because they're so few of the good ones available since the owners of those keep them, AND now the owners of the "not as good ones" may try to sell theirs to you 'cause all you want to see is a label. You're a rookie, you can't juge a bass untill you develop some chops. So first things first, excuse the harshness, follow the NEWBIE LINKS.
     
  14. matt essay

    matt essay

    Dec 28, 2002
    Healdsburg CA
    Thanks guys

    The newbie links really helped.