Dismiss Notice

Psst... Ready to join TalkBass and start posting, make new friends, sell your gear, and more?  Register your free account in 30 seconds.

K&K Mic for Bass now available

Discussion in 'Amps, Mics & Pickups [DB]' started by Bob Gollihur, Dec 17, 2000.


  1. Bob Gollihur

    Bob Gollihur GollihurMusic.com

    Mar 22, 2000
    New Joisey Shore
    Big Cheese Emeritus: Gollihur Music
  2. AlexFeldman

    AlexFeldman

    Jun 18, 2000
    Chicago, IL
    Does it sound good soloed, or does it need to be combined with a K&K preamp for its true potential to be realized?
     
  3. Bob Gollihur

    Bob Gollihur GollihurMusic.com

    Mar 22, 2000
    New Joisey Shore
    Big Cheese Emeritus: Gollihur Music
    It sounds very good soloed -- like the bass. It was tested as the sole sound source, with different amp and speaker combinations and headphones. The Golden Mic is also available separately, with just a preamp/power box, but as a journeyman bassist who has been using pickups and mics for 35+ yrs., at least in my experience, there are situations when a room forced your hand, and a mic won't do the job by itself -- and a pickup is necessary to supplement it. Of course, that doesn't mean it's the case for everyone, but a variety of gigs and rooms caused me to suggest to K&K that we start with the integrated system for practicality's sake.
     
  4. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY
    I got my K&K Trinity a few days ago, and I have to say, it sounds amazingly basslike! I'm pairing/mixing it with a Realist, and the sound is really good. As advertised, the thing is pretty feedback resistant, and the extra EQ on the preamp helps cut back those nasty ringers. My one complaint, which is a small one, is that the "gooseneck" contraption that the mic is attached to is kind of flimsy, and needs some help to stay in place. This is a drag during the period in which you are searching for the right place to put it, but once you find the sweet spot, it doesn't really matter.

    On my bass, it did exactly what I needed: beefing up the sound on the top 3 strings (esp. the G), and adding a little clarity to the whole thing. On the whole, it's a helluva bargain for the buck. Kudos to K&K and (All Hail) Bob Gollihur!
     
  5. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY
    Mr. Ed,

    Yeah, the mic was made to run through a mixer/preamp (which comes with it), and direct into the amp. So far, it sounds great that way, but I've only played with it solo/duo so far. The trio is supposed to play on Tuesday night, and if we end up doing the gig, I'll send a review from the trenches on how it reacts to drums in a fairly loud room.

    BTW, there's a guy over in "Explain your username" who's waiting to hear your Elvin story (sorry, some idiot musta spilled the beans....)

    [Edited by Chris Fitzgerald on 12-30-2000 at 09:55 AM]
     
  6. Bob Gollihur

    Bob Gollihur GollihurMusic.com

    Mar 22, 2000
    New Joisey Shore
    Big Cheese Emeritus: Gollihur Music
    The preamp also has a single 1/4" jack with the mic signal only, so you can send it separately to a board if you want.

    Monte Butts, who also bought a system about a week before Chris, posted his take and multiple experiences in the 2xbass list a couple days ago:

    "Date: Thu, 28 Dec 2000 12:06:00 -0600
    From: "Monte Butts - EnviroBay.com" <mbutts@greatventure.com>
    To: <2xbasslist@u.washington.edu>
    Subject: Review for the K & K Golden Trinity mic

    I recently bought the new K & K Golden Trinity mic system for upright bass, and after putting it through its paces, I'm very impressed. At a cost of $193 (delivered by U.S. mail from Bob Gollihur's web site), it is easily better than anything I've tried up to $600. It can be seen here http://www.gollihur.com/kkbass and comes with a 2-channel preamp to power the mic and mix in a pick-up if you need more punch. The mic attaches to the bridge via dual lock, which is an extra strength velcro, and it is about an inch long on a gooseneck that allows you to position it wherever sounds best around your F-hole. The position I found that worked for me was to angle the mic about 20 degrees AWAY from the F-hole; it was very clear and not boomy. The preamp took some getting used to, the tone and gain controls are inside the preamp, but I found that after I set them flat and screwed back on the top of the preamp, I shouldn't need to adjust them again. It just took some getting used to for someone more familiar with the Fishman system, with controls on the outside.

    The first test was my practice studio. I ran it through my Acoustic Image Contra amp and was pleased with the results. In a small room it could get pretty loud before feedback. As far as mixing it with my Bass Max pick-up, it sounded ok, but I'm a bad judge of that; I tend to dislike these kinds of mixes, so I would probably use either all mic or all pick-up, but that is my personal preference.

    The second test came using it in the orchestra at my church. Usually the sound man sticks an omnidirectional above the violins and an SM57 about 2 feet in front of my bass. Running through the house was very good, the sound man said that it was easy to tell the difference between my arco and the organ pedals, even when we were playing the same notes. Playing solo before church, it filled up the big sanctuary with a really nice sound, and when the pianist and I messed around on some duo jazz stuff, it was really full and rich on the pizz.

    The third test was an unfair environment last night, and it still gets a passing grade. Morris Nelms, pianist extrordianire was back in OKC from Austin, so we had a big jam session in our guitarists' living room. I was running through our generic Peavey PA system. First, I played trio with piano and a guy playing brushes on a snare, and the results were as good as before. Next, everyone showed up and the fun began. It was drums, piano, trumpet, fluegelhorn, alto sax, tenor sax, guitar, me, and even a vocalist on a couple of tunes. If the mic could handle 8 instruments in a small room, I would be surprised. The first tune didn't work well, lots of rumble and feedback; however, turning where the back of my bass was all that faced the drums completely solved it, and the rest of the night it was fine. Actually, after the session, when I asked opinions, the people on the opposite side of the room said I could have even turned down more, but because of where I was playing, I might have had trouble hearing myself. I can't imagine too many situations where bleed through from instruments would be worse than where we were last night. As with all mic systems, where you place yourself is important.

    I haven't gotten to do the last test, seeing how it records at my friends' studio, as weather has prevented us from getting together, but even if it doesn't do as well as the other tests, it is still well worth the cost. My recommendation would be to pick one of these up before the price goes up, it is easily worth more than this. As a matter of personal preference, the design of the mic isn't my favorite, because you need to have a pickup on your bass to plug in the cable that come off of the mic jack (they split with one cable ending in the gooseneck mic and the other in a cable to plug into the pick-up jack). This makes the bass look a little cluttered, but this is a minor detail that I was more than willing to overlook in favor of its utility. Great product, in my opinion, and I didn't receive a kickback from Bob either ;-)


    Monte Butts
    Marketing Director
    Great Venture Inc. / EnviroBay.com
    http://www.envirobay.com
    (877) 404-1134"
     
  7. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY
    Yet more praise for the K&K Trinity: in addition to sounding extremely clean and acoustic thru my Baby Blue II amp for live situations, it also records incredibly well as a line/mic signal running directly into the board. Last night I used it to record for the first time. It was late, I was tired, and to be honest I tried it because I was too lazy to drag out a mic, mic stand and mic cable and set the whole thing up. Not expecting too much but hoping for the best, I plugged the Trinity signal direct from the preamp out into the board and recorded a take.

    When I had finished and was listening to the playback, I got this big smile that settled over my whole face as I realized that, for home recording anyway, I'll never have to set up another mic & stand for the bass again. The Trinity signal sounded every bit as good direct as a mic placed 6-9" away from the bridge, and the response was so even across the entire range of the instrument that I can almost get away without doing any post production mixing on the bass at all (which I had to do w/ my old setup). This also means that the next time I do a live recording, I can give the sound guy that feed, and finally be in control of the sound I'm gonna get(well, they can still screw up the EQ.....). Bob isn't paying me either, but for the money, this may be the coolest piece of gear I've bought in a long, long time.

    All Hail Bob Gollihur!
     
  8. Chris: The Trinity system intrigues me, but I get queasy when I read the words "internal trim controls." I don't like taking things apart anymore than I have to. How difficult is getting to and setting these preamp controls? (I did read the other review but I'm interested in your opinion as well.) Do you find you have to readjust for each venue/studio (in other words are you unscrewing the thing on stage before a gig) or was it a one-time-set-it-and-forget-it operation?
    I'm currently experimenting with a Bass Max/condenser mic blend but at present my mic is a full size condenser and picks up everything in the room plus most of the sounds in the neighborhood, so I'm very interested in the Trinity.

    Thanks in advance for any input.
    Mark
     
  9. PJL

    PJL

    Dec 29, 2000
    Has anyone A/B d' the new K&K mic with an AMT? Recently a very good player strongly recommended the AMT and I was saving money to get one, they retail for around $800 but I was still shopping around. Any thoughts would be helpful. Also, Bob you should send out an email regarding the new mic this is the first I heard about it. Happy New Year, PJ
     
  10. Bob Gollihur

    Bob Gollihur GollihurMusic.com

    Mar 22, 2000
    New Joisey Shore
    Big Cheese Emeritus: Gollihur Music
    Double Dad - If I can respond... I initially felt the same way when I first got the K&K Bass Master Pro -- it, too, has internal trimmers for EQ and overall gain for each channel, with just the two volume controls on the outside. What I quickly learned was that, after a brief experience period and minor adjustments, I settled on settings and never touched them again once I found "my sound" for each pickup. I found messing with them per gig really isn't necessary or a good idea -- I do my adjustments at the amp to compensate for room or stage peculiarities, and therefore have my predictable "reference sound" no matter where I go. I'll vary volume of each pickup for the gig and style of music, and EQ for the room at the amp. Same with the Golden Trinity Mic for URB.

    PJ - I posted announcements here and on a few other key places, but didn't do any mass emailings. It just became available before Christmas, and I haven't had time to even write up the instructions for K&K yet. I hope to do a press release for K&K soon.
     
  11. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY
    Double Dad,

    What Bob said. I've found that if I start messing around with the internal controls during a gig, I lose that good reference sound, end up wasting a lot of time, and come back to the same setting eventually. Once the internals are set, your amp EQ does a heck of a lot better job adjusting to the room than anything else you might try. As far as getting to the internal controls, it's not hard, but it's something you want to do in the privacy of your own home when you have time to burn. I say "time to burn" because the internal controls are incredibly sensitive, and a tiny twist of one of the trimmers makes a big tonal difference. I spent a couple of hours getting mine right (this included asking some other folks whose opinion of tone I trust to listen while I tweaked the trimmers), and will probably not touch them again for some time.

    As for the extraneous noise issue, I'll report in on Wednesday - my first jazz gig with a drummer since I got the thing is Tuesday night, and we're in a pretty loud coffeehouse with lotsa people up close and loud grinders and milk steamers etc....so I'll have a pretty good idea of how it can handle noise and drums by the end of tomorrow night. Until then.....
     
  12. Bob and Chris--thanks for the information.
    By the way, chalk up another one for the Bass Max. While rehearsing with a guitarist today I ran the pickup straight into a Peavey mixer head and then into my old spare amp, a Heathkit solid state (it does have two vintage Jensen speakers) and man it sounded good! The guitarist couldn't believe how nice it sounded, and I was ecstatic that I could actually hear myself over the electric guitar.
     
  13. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY
    A funny thing happened to me in my jazz theory class yesterday. I was taking roll and chit-chatting with some of my students when one of them (a DB player) said he saw my product review at Bob Gollihur's website. I didn't know what he was talking about, so I went to the site when I got home, and there, bigger than life, were most of my compiled postings about the Trinity posted under "Comments from other Bassists". I must say, even though I was not attempting become a salesman in any way, that was a rather glowing endorsement. HEY BOB, WHERE'S MY CHECK?

    Seriously, though, both I and the student were impressed that not only did my positive comments make it into this "review", but my (single) complaint about the system was also right there with the rest. This is one of the many things that I respect about the site. ALL HAIL BOB GOLLIHUR!

    But jeez, Bob, if I'da knowd you wuz gunna put muh name in lites 'n all, I'da tride tuh get all cleened up'n whatnot 'n fixxed muh spellin 'n such...
     
  14. Bob Gollihur

    Bob Gollihur GollihurMusic.com

    Mar 22, 2000
    New Joisey Shore
    Big Cheese Emeritus: Gollihur Music
    So now your fame preceeds you! ;-)
     
  15. AlexFeldman

    AlexFeldman

    Jun 18, 2000
    Chicago, IL
    Bob, you're a great guy, but you're giving me GAS. :) I just need to get a few things straight before I order the Trinity...

    Does the $188 upgrade include the preamp, or just the mic? Is the preamp onboard, and if so, how is it attached?

    [Edited by AlexFeldman on 01-28-2001 at 08:12 PM]
     
  16. Bob Gollihur

    Bob Gollihur GollihurMusic.com

    Mar 22, 2000
    New Joisey Shore
    Big Cheese Emeritus: Gollihur Music
    $188 for mic, cable, and two channel external preamp w/beltclip. I have had some guys attach the preamp for the Bass Master Pro and Rockabilly systems (same size) on their tailpieces - it's small and light -- but I prefer it on my belt.

    See all the info, details, including photos, at http://www.gollihur.com/kkbass/bassmic.html - there are models that incorporate one of two K&K Sound pickups, the model that will accommodate your existing pickup (the $188 model), and you can also get the mic and power module by itself.

     
  17. AlexFeldman

    AlexFeldman

    Jun 18, 2000
    Chicago, IL
    Okay. I got my Golden Trinity in the mail today (Thursday) after ordering it on Monday afternoon. It really does what it promises, folks. After about an hour of tweaking the mic and the EQ inside the preamp, I finally, for the first time heard /my bass/ coming out of my amplifier. I spent several minutes bending over with my ear in front of the bass, and then the amp's speaker. They're so close it almost brings tears to my eyes.

    So the Golden Trinity upgrade package passes the wallet, shipping, and living room tests! We'll see how it holds up in rehearsal tomorrow (personally, I can't wait).

    [Edited by AlexFeldman on 02-08-2001 at 11:09 PM]
     
  18. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY
    Alex,

    congrats on the new gear! That sound of your bass coming out of your amp for the first time is pretty cool, isn't it? So, what pickup are you mixing the mic with? (profile fields are down, rrrrgh!) Your comments are pretty positive about the Trinity. If you're not careful, Bob might make you a spokesman as well.

    Also, let me know some more details on your travel/arrival during Jazz week at UofL on the 22nd & 23rd. I have gigs both nights, so we might need to get together early in the morning if we are going to hang at all.

    Chris
     
  19. AlexFeldman

    AlexFeldman

    Jun 18, 2000
    Chicago, IL
    I am mixing it with the Realist. Right now, I have all the highs and mids coming from the realist dialed out and the lows boosted a little bit. And the highs and some mids are coming off the mic.

    The thing about getting a great signal is that you need a really clean amp to get 'that' sound. My WW/Raezer's Edge 12 does that job just fine, but the tone isn't quite as nice through my GK MB200 (a 1x12 combo weighing about 14 pounds).

    I played the rig yesterday in a large, cavernous, bass-unfriendly room, and it did quite well. A sincere drummer, standing at the back of the room, said:

    'The highs cut, but they weren't twangy. The lows were there and were only boomy at the beginning of the sound check... what the hell is on your bass, anyway?'
     
  20. Bob Gollihur

    Bob Gollihur GollihurMusic.com

    Mar 22, 2000
    New Joisey Shore
    Big Cheese Emeritus: Gollihur Music
    Just to mention I've updated my page with the K&K Golden Trinity Mic on it.

    The condensor microphone, with mount, is also available by itself (no pickup or provision for one). It comes with a small preamp/powering box with an XLR output that takes a 9v battery or runs on phantom power. Also available with a 1/4" jack out.

    For $118-$125, depending on wiring configuration. Details at bottom of page at http://www.gollihur.com/kkbass/bassmic.html

    Last Borders gig I did I had the Upgrade system with my Bass Max but used the mic only and it was great.