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Ken smith - neck laminate question

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by jivetkr, Jul 16, 2004.


  1. jivetkr

    jivetkr

    May 15, 2002
    NJ
    I have a smith BSR-MW that has a 3 piece maple neck.

    I can feel the seams under my thumb where the neck laminates meet.

    Is it normal to be able to feel the seams? Or is this a sign of something worse?
     
  2. vanselus

    vanselus

    Sep 20, 2000
    Boulder, CO
    None
    On both Smiths I've owned, I could feel the laminates too. Not sure if that's bad or good or neither, but it's definitely there.
     
  3. 6-3-2

    6-3-2

    Sep 20, 2003
    You would think the guys at Ken Smith would fix that, if you find it a problem? I don't know about the guys at Ken Smith but seems like most boutique builders would do you that service.
     
  4. KSB - Ken Smith

    KSB - Ken Smith Banned Commercial User

    Mar 1, 2002
    Perkasie, PA USA
    Owner: Ken Smith Basses, Ltd.
    All wood moves in time. When you sweat or heat up the wood with friction over time the vavious laminates will breathe and move at different rates. The glue in the laminate dosen't move. Just the wood around it does. The slightest movement can be annoying but never a problem for the structure of the Bass.

    Hey, 6-3-2, you have a name? Use it so your questions, if you have one can be addressed. Most people call us if they have a concern rather than to post alarming or inflamatory remarks. This is not a 911 service. You posted your remark within a few hours of the original question as if we left him bleeding to death on the side of the road !!

    Jivetkr? , This is a simple fix if it needs fixing at all.
     
  5. KenToby

    KenToby

    Aug 15, 2002
    I had the same thing happen to my BSR4EG but it's no big deal since I do understand that wood is a dynamic material. This could happen on any instrument no doubt.

    None the less, I don't see where 6-3-2 stepped out of line. His opinion was that given the Smith reputation, etc., it may behoove Jivetkr to have it looked at.

    Again guys, no biggie, it's common in "sandwich" type construction.

    KT


     
  6. Hi Ken,

    I'm not sure that 6-3-2 intended the remark to be alarming or inflammatory, just not necessarily expressed so well. By "you would think that the guys at Ken Smith would fix that...", I expect he just meant that he had no reason not to think that you would fix it if the owner found it to be a problem. Of course, it came out implying something else. :eek: Not everyone is aware of the connations that different ways of saying things can have, alas.

    Mike
     
  7. godoze

    godoze

    Oct 21, 2002
    Every Smith I've played or owned has had this phenomena. I've played Smiths made in the 80's and one's fresh outta the shop.

    Never been an issue for me.
     
  8. jivetkr

    jivetkr

    May 15, 2002
    NJ
    Thanks for the responses guys. Especially Ken's.
     
  9. JRBrown

    JRBrown

    Jun 21, 2000
    North Carolina
    Why not.. ;)

    - My Smiths have never had this issue.
    - My F-Bass had a very slight ridge that could only be felt if you looked for it. George F-Bass told me to sand it out.
    - Several Warricks I palyed had two or more ridges the entire length of the neck
    - Two of my Alembics had ridges. Alembic told me to send the bass in for additional sanding. They said the same thing Ken said above--wood moves over time at different rates.

    This is nothing but an annoyance. If it bothers you, send it to Ken.
     
  10. jivetkr

    jivetkr

    May 15, 2002
    NJ
    I dont live that far from Kens shop so I would drive it over there. I hope I get the time one of these days. With working full time its hard...That & I'm lazy. ;)
     
  11. godoze

    godoze

    Oct 21, 2002
    why don't you take it it to someone local ?
     
  12. 6-3-2

    6-3-2

    Sep 20, 2003
    Whoah, it wasn't a nasty comment, I just said I don't if you'd do that or not. Gotta edit this one, even my apology came off wrong.
     
  13. :eyebrow: :rollno:
     
  14. jacochops

    jacochops

    Jul 2, 2000
    Suzhou, China
    Here's what I did, as per instructions from one of the guys at Ken Smith's shop....
    Get some 600 grit paper and some of the Smith wax (the stuff that comes in the little soft bottle that looks a bit like honey). Take your neck off, apply a little of the wax to the back of the neck, and sand the "ridges" lengthwise out of the neck. It took about 20 minutes to do, and when I was done, it was as smooth as a baby's butt! Really worked great. Basically "wet sanding" with the Smith wax.
    Ken...if I'm wrong here, please correct me. It did work wonderfully for me, by the way.
    When I called the shop to ask for some clues, they were more than helpful and extremely courteous. I dug the whole experience (and the sound of my Smith) so much, I bought a 3 band preamp from Smith, and put it into my new Nordstrand!
    Needless to say, the service was great.
     
  15. jivetkr

    jivetkr

    May 15, 2002
    NJ
    I could take it to someone local, but since I live a couple of hours from smiths shop I would rather just take it to the place it was born. This way I at least get to see the shop, maybe meet the man & that would be pretty cool.

    Take the neck off & sand it huh? I'll leave it to the pro's. I'm good adjusting my neck & doing minor setups, but I definatly dont take necks off. I just wouldnt feel comfortable taking the smith apart. If we were talking about my frankenJazz, then sure...But not my smith. Its my baby. Plus...My fiance bought it for me & if she saw me taking it apart she would probably kill me.

    6-3-2...nice post. :rollno:
     
  16. KSB - Ken Smith

    KSB - Ken Smith Banned Commercial User

    Mar 1, 2002
    Perkasie, PA USA
    Owner: Ken Smith Basses, Ltd.
    Be careful with the 'sanding' term. We just use a little 1500/micron paper and knock the glue line down a bit. You dont wanna remove any of the finish. 600 grit wet/dry is ok if you do it lightly. The wax we provide does not replace worn or sanded away finish !
     
  17. jacochops

    jacochops

    Jul 2, 2000
    Suzhou, China
    Hey Ken.
    Sorry for the wrong sandpaper grit. I used what your guys sent me...come to think of it, it was 1500 micron paper....hey, at least I said 600 grit, not 60 grit, right? ;)
    ...worked great, though.
    Ken, I have another question...how did you come to place the back pickup on your soapbar-equipped basses as close to the bridge as it is? Does one of the sets of polepieces line up the traditional "jazz bass" position, or was it through trial-and-error, or through your own personal preference tonally? I'm interested to know, as I play primarily over the back pickup, and its location in proximity to the bridge makes for quite a taut feel in comparison to a "Jazz pickup" location. I would LOVE to play one of your BSR-J models...I wonder if that might fit my needs better? Is the back pickup location on the BSR-J model in standard 60s or 70s J bass location, or is it placed in accordance with your own specs?
    Let me know, as I'd love to get a BSR-J with a maple core/figured walnut top on the "gotta get immediately" list! :help:
     
  18. KSB - Ken Smith

    KSB - Ken Smith Banned Commercial User

    Mar 1, 2002
    Perkasie, PA USA
    Owner: Ken Smith Basses, Ltd.
    This is a bit off topic but I will say that Trial and error or rather Evoloution is the source of our designs and pickup placements.

    Please call me to discuss this further or start a new Thread with pickup placement as the topic.