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Kill switch wiring

Discussion in 'Pickups & Electronics [BG]' started by Milothicus, Jan 19, 2004.


  1. I'm wiring in a kill switch, and i'm not sure where to put it, exactly. my pots are wired as EMG send them:
    [​IMG]
    and i figured i'd place the switch as described in this thread. i'm not sure where the sum of the pickup pots is....i know i'm taking a wire off the output jack, but i don't know which one. any help is appreciated.
     
  2. Trevorus

    Trevorus

    Oct 18, 2002
    Urbana, IL
    here's the one with the kill switch.

    [​IMG]
     
  3. that's where i thought it would be. thanks for the prompt help.....and the great drawing of the switch B+)
     
  4. nonsqtr

    nonsqtr The emperor has no clothes!

    Aug 29, 2003
    Burbank CA USA
    Watch out, your entire instrument cable can turn into a gigantic antenna if you wire the switch that way. Please let us know how it works. :)
     
  5. that's not good...... is there a better way? it's just the simplest wiring that i found. i have some electrical knowledge, but not enough to predict things like that......or decide where to put the switch myself....
     
  6. Trevorus

    Trevorus

    Oct 18, 2002
    Urbana, IL
    you could also add a capacitor that would silence the click somewhat, and prevent radio interference. Some people also use a resistor.[​IMG]
     
  7. nonsqtr

    nonsqtr The emperor has no clothes!

    Aug 29, 2003
    Burbank CA USA
    Well, I don't know much about those EMG pickups. I've heard that some of them have 'built-in' preamps. Is that the case with yours? (I'm lookin' at the battery, and don't see any electronics). :)

    Ordinarily, I'd say that short circuiting the output jack would be the way to go. But don't know what this might do to the preamp, if it doesn't have some protection in it, it won't be happy with a zero ohm load. If it tries to keep up, it'll surely fry the preamp chip (or transistor, or whatever it uses).
     
  8. the controls are passive, but the pickups are active.....meaning the signal is boosted in the pickups, and the volumes and tone are just passive cut-only standard pots...but 25K pots.

    i was planning on putting a 100K ohm resistor between the switch and the ground. that's what was described in the other thread. is a capacitor a better idea? if so, could you help me out with the value of capacitor?
     
  9. Trevorus

    Trevorus

    Oct 18, 2002
    Urbana, IL
    .1 mfd or something like that. Try both, and see if you notice any difference. Try what works best. You could do some calculations and see if you could find the value of capacitor that would block out any hum that might get through on the guitar side, but it really would be unneccessary. But like I said, try both an pick the one that seems to work best for you.
     
  10. TRU

    TRU

    Apr 12, 2002
    Northern Europe
    How about putting the kill switch to the battery wire? That would not only silence the thing but you could also leave the cord in and still have the PU's unpowered -> longer battery life.
     
  11. nonsqtr

    nonsqtr The emperor has no clothes!

    Aug 29, 2003
    Burbank CA USA
    That'll work, but you'll probably get a loud "thump" when you flip the switch.
     
  12. Skips

    Skips

    Feb 19, 2003
    Not if you use a capactor. Put it in between the "on" of the switch and the "-" of the battery. That way, it'll fade on over the course of a fraction of a second, and fade off as well, eliminating both pops.
     
  13. Ok.... it's done. i tried putting the switch on the battery line with a capacitor, but the result was the output being about half what it usually is, and the switch having no effect..... so i put the switch on the output line......but for some reason, i just put the common on the switch to the output of the pickups, then put one 'ON' side through a resistor to the output jack......i'm not sure why i did this, but it worked. B+) then after reassembling the bass, i realized how i had wired it, and ripped it all apart again.... and wired one ON to the jack, and the other ON through a 100K resistor to ground. works like a charm.

    [​IMG]

    It's basically this one with a 100k resistor instead of a capacitor.

    would a capacitor be a better idea? any reason that the resistor is bad? it works, but i'm looking for the best possible solution.
     
  14. Trevorus

    Trevorus

    Oct 18, 2002
    Urbana, IL
    a capacitor will do about the same thing. It's probably not good to have the switch on the battery line. Not good for the electronics.