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Labella 0760M on Squier VM Jazz?

Discussion in 'Strings [BG]' started by taught, May 2, 2018.


  1. taught

    taught

    Jan 5, 2015
    Hungary
    I have a Squier Vintage Modified Jazz Bass 70's bass and I have a set of La Bella 0760M flatwounds strings which I would like to apply on it. Currently a set of Elixir .45-.105 set is installed.

    I am really familiar with truss rod, intonation and action adjustment since I like setting up my bass properly (following Fender's standards on their website) and I always keep an eye on it and do things if necessary.

    Should I expect any problem because this is not a high end neck or if I tighten the truss rod as the additional tension requires it then it should be OK? (I am aware that the net and maybe the tuning poles should be widened).

    Also:
    1. How do I know if I am near maxing out a truss rod and should not go forward?
    2. What happens if I turn the truss rod more than I should? Should buy a new neck altogether?
     
  2. Pier_

    Pier_

    Dec 22, 2013
    Roma, Italia
    that's impossible. the truss rod has a certain run. if you are out of turns, it's over. if you tighten it too much and the neck is too straight, just loose it.

     
  3. taught

    taught

    Jan 5, 2015
    Hungary
    Thanks for the reply @Pier_

    Maybe I overreact this thing but the whole interwebs is about how brutal these strings are so I thought it worth a question.
    The fact that you used it on a SUB Ray 4 and a Harley Benton Jazz without a problem sounds good since these basses are on the same level (guess the HB is a little bit below than the SUB and Squier).

    I've read your earlier posts where you mentioned that Rotosound Jazz77 45-105 are tighter. I find it interesting that it is not feared as the La Bella's. It is the gauge numbers that frighten people? Maybe we should take a look at the numbers at how much actual tension is applied instead of just the gauge of the string.
     
  4. Pier_

    Pier_

    Dec 22, 2013
    Roma, Italia
    I guess that it's only a matter of "urban legends", as in the majority of cases about instruments, mostly due to the story of Jamerson's bass with a bowed neck, but that wasn't about strings.
    also Carol Kaye, Joe Osborn and Donald Dunn used the same strings, and they are not known for high action! au contraire, they are well known for the "fret smashing" sound with both hands and pick.
    same thing in the first two albums of the Led Zeppelin, when John Paul Jones used the Labellas.
    also Garry Tallent uses them on his Stingray in most classic Springsteen records (except Born To Run, where he's known for using the Danelectro Longhorn). My favourite is The River, where he's sound is so well mixed and audible. that's why I tried them on the Sub Ray 4 :D and got that kind of sound.

    most people doesn't even try what they talk about, and the small part that tires, sometimes doesn't have the right arguments:

    for example, most people I know tend to jump from 45-105 to 52-110 in a matter of seconds, maybe without a proper setup, and then write on forums about how these strings are hard to play, or how much they bend the neck.

    when I first tried them, it was on a Classic 50's Precision, and I went from Rotosound Swing66 (45-105) to Labella, and just needed to tighten the truss rod to match the tension, and then it came the action and octave setup.
    I used it with those strings for a few months and then switched back to Rotosound, due to a matter of sound I needed.

    when I tried them on the Harley Benton (which has quality hardware, however!) and the Sub Ray 4 I went from Ernie Ball 50-105 to them, and actually didn't have to tighten anything.
    the Harley Benton still shows them with pride, the Sub went away sold with an old set of D'Addario rounds.

    same on the Tbird, from EB 50-105 to Labella 52-110, no truss rod adjustment, only action and octave.

    the real deal with this set is that it almost doesn't vibrate, so you can keep the lowest action you can imagine and don't have any unwanted buzz.
    however they are still playable strings.

    Rotosound Jazz77 are less known, almost only for the 50-110 set used by Steve Harris, and they are extremely tight and hard, much more than the Labella.
    they are also rough in texture. the first time I tried a 45-105 set of those string, coming from a 50-110 set of Swing66, I almost couldn't play!
    they are so tight and rigid that when I detuned them, they broke at the tuners, and I couldn't reuse them.

    one of my sets of Labella was dismounted few times, mounted on the Sub Ray4, for a while on a Warwick Streamer LX (which I forgot in the previous post!) and then on the Tbird and fretless Harley Benton, and they still can be straighten once dismounted, so the are more flexible than Rotosound Jazz77.

    after this long post, I can just say that I love those strings, and are my go-to flats since I first tried them. I'm so sad that Labella doesn't make the short scale set, because my second Gibson SG Reissue has a cheap set of D'Addario Chromes, and the difference is so clear...
     
    taught likes this.
  5. HaphAsSard

    HaphAsSard

    Dec 1, 2013
    Italia
    Wait, have they stopped making them?
    I linked to a British online string store which has the shorty '54/Original/Jamerson/whatever La Bella flats (#0760M-S) available in the following post of mine, which incidentally mentioned you as not a fan of thick gauges on short-scale basses :p
    Short scale high tension strings.
     
  6. Pier_

    Pier_

    Dec 22, 2013
    Roma, Italia
    I searched the Labella site, Lord Of The Strings, Bassstringsonline, Stringbusters and Saiten Markt, and they are no more available.
    only medium scale.
    I'll give a look at the site you mentioned

    I'm still, except for the SG Reissue. it doesn't sound good with light strings. my favourite by far are the D'Addario EX160, 50-105 nickel, wonderful sounding.
    the second one I bought came with brand new D'Addario Chromes 45-100 short scale (they have the same tension of the 50-105 nickel rounds), but they are "cheaper" than the Labellas, from the texture to the sound.
    however, still playable and ok.
     
  7. HaphAsSard

    HaphAsSard

    Dec 1, 2013
    Italia
    Here's the specific link:
    La Bella 4-String Original 1954 Short Scale Flatwound Bass Strings
    Alternatively, BSO does still have them:
    La Bella 1954 Originals Deep Talkin' Flatwound Electric Bass Strings Short Scale Set - 4-String 52-110 0760M-S
    The s-s version is mentioned as being available on the official product page (which in itself is no surefire proof - official website does not equal up-to-date) but it can't be bought directly from there anyway.

    Got it. Yeah, "it depends" is very often the right answer :thumbsup:
     
  8. taught

    taught

    Jan 5, 2015
    Hungary
    FYI I applied the strings today. I destringed the instrument and tightened a quarter on the truss rod in advance while it was free of strings so no pressure was on it ATM. I installed the labellas. It turned out that a quarter tightening was almost the perfect sweet spot so I am good with the neck. Then I lowered the action a lot since I could. Intonation setup wasn't needed which surprised me but I was happy about it.

    It is a bit harder on the left hand but nothing extreme. It is indeed stiffer on the right hand too but this is very welcomed from me since I dont like the looseness of the 45-105 on the right hand.
     
  9. Pier_

    Pier_

    Dec 22, 2013
    Roma, Italia
    yeah :) in particular I love bigger strings on the SG because the neck is wider than the average short scale bass. when I had the Mustang, the 500/1 and the Longhorn they all had very thin and narrow necks, and bigger strings were the equal of a minimum string spacing.
    the SG has a chunky and wide neck, so it takes bigger strings better.

    the thing I really love of these strings is that you can have ALL the dynamic range from your plucking hand: you can play super soft and have a super soft tone, play at your heaviest, and take out all the volume from the strings without the "compression" you encounter with small strings.

    with small gauges there is a limit on the volume you can get from them, and if you play hard they "follow" the fingers and you can also lose the timing, still not getting the volume you wanted.
    with heavy gauges you can smash the strings without fatigue, obtaining all the volume you need every time.

    keep up with them, they'll grow on you!
     
    taught likes this.
  10. taught

    taught

    Jan 5, 2015
    Hungary
    One thing though: they are super sticky! Hopefully it's gonna wear off.
     
  11. Pier_

    Pier_

    Dec 22, 2013
    Roma, Italia
    that's what happens with every flatwound, in particular super-smooth flats. in a while you'll find the rounds sticky and Labellas too slippery :D
     
  12. GIBrat51

    GIBrat51 Innocent as the day is long Supporting Member

    Mar 5, 2013
    Lost Wages, Nevada
    Fender-neck-test. While there are flat wounds with comparatively high tension - the La Bella "Jamerson" flats, and the Steve Harris Signature Roto 77s certainly qualify - most flat wound strings aren't actually any higher tension than most round wound strings. The diameter of the string's core is what (mostly) determines the tension required to pull it to pitch; all other things being equal, larger core diameter = higher tension. What flatwound strings are, compared to rounds, is Stiff. Which is caused by the flat outer winding. High tension feels stiff, but it's not the same thing, really. As for your neck? I'm pretty sure that this guy would say it will be just fine...:thumbsup:
     
    Last edited: May 8, 2018
    taught likes this.

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