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lacquer bubbles

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by sansa, Mar 25, 2013.


  1. sansa

    sansa

    Feb 20, 2013
    Hi there! I've just sprayed my body and it's turned out fine. The only problem is that I have persisted too much and in a couple of segments appeared some bubbles. How can I solve this problem? Thank you very much.
    PS: the lacquer is acrylic and is still wet (it dryes in a week or more...very slow)
    Here a couple of photos:
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Looks like runs, not bubbles.

    You'll have to sand them out once the finish has cured enough.
     
  3. Rickett Customs

    Rickett Customs

    Jul 30, 2007
    Southern Maryland
    Luthier: Rickett Customs...........www.rickettcustomguitars.com
    If it's running like that, you're either spraying too close or keeping it in one spot too long.........
    you should try using light "sweeps".
     
  4. Hopkins

    Hopkins Supporting Member Commercial User

    Nov 17, 2010
    Houston Tx
    Owner/Builder @Hopkins Guitars
    There is a fine line between spraying to much finish and getting runs and not spraying enough and getting orange peel. Personally I would rather sand out a run.

    The fact that those runs are not on a flat surface will make it a bit more difficult. I would find a cylinder that is close to the same shape as the area you need to sand and use it as a sanding block. Start with 400 grit being careful not to sand past your color coat.

    Do this only after it is dry enough to sand. This could be a couple of weeks.
     
  5. sansa

    sansa

    Feb 20, 2013
    what do you mean with "light sweeps"? light sanding, polishing, spot remover keys?
     
  6. Rickett Customs

    Rickett Customs

    Jul 30, 2007
    Southern Maryland
    Luthier: Rickett Customs...........www.rickettcustomguitars.com
    Sansa,
    During the action of spraying.

    To remove, refer to hopkins above
     
  7. sansa

    sansa

    Feb 20, 2013
    Do you think that circumscribing the area with some bodyshop tape would work during sanding?
    Another thing I can't understand is when exactly the paint is dried? i mean now I can touch the paint and feel it's not sticky. But if I touch it for more than 2 seconds I feel it sticky. do you think it's a good method?
     
  8. fraublugher

    fraublugher

    Nov 19, 2004
    ottawa, ontario, canada
    music school retailer
    He means the movement of you spraying arm has to be moving will applicating at all times.

    Like Bernstein conducting a rehearsal , eyes on the prize [score], wave at the lead trumpeter he's too loud etc

    Sand between every coat .
    Any new coat must face the cieling to dry , don't give the drying paint a place to go.

    Laquer thinners are your friend, in this respect
    good luck
     
  9. miner

    miner

    Oct 26, 2008
    Chicago
    Best way to know if it is dry is to wait the amount of time the paint says to wait. Touching the paint to check could leave finger marks. Also, just because it is dry to the touch, does not mean it is completely dry.
     
  10. Konquest

    Konquest

    Aug 26, 2003
    Wisconsin
    You can use a razor blade like a card scraper over the run to take it down quickly, then get it flush with sandpaper and synthetic wool pads.
     
  11. Hopkins

    Hopkins Supporting Member Commercial User

    Nov 17, 2010
    Houston Tx
    Owner/Builder @Hopkins Guitars

    The best way I know to tell if it is dry or not is to smell it. If you can still smell the solvents then its probably not a good idea to start wet sanding.
     
  12. Big B.

    Big B.

    Dec 31, 2007
    Austin, TX
    This is the best bet if you dont have the drying info available. I prefer to use an extra thin cabinet scraper for removing runs. It leaves a glass smooth surface with only minimal sanding needed. All of the options presented above will work perfectly well though, the scraper is just my personal preference.
     
  13. sansa

    sansa

    Feb 20, 2013
    ....
     
  14. sansa

    sansa

    Feb 20, 2013
    the can shows just that each coat has to be sprayed beetween 2 minutes and keep it off dust for 15 minutes and don't touch for 2 hours... that's it! completely wrong "I suppose"!... I wait for 4 days and I can still feel it sticky and the bubbles are soft...
    PS: I touch the areas that aren't important... like near the pickup holes or in the back where I put the cover...
     
  15. sansa

    sansa

    Feb 20, 2013
    it's acrylic lacquer. I don't think that solvent-based (synthetic) acrylic exists... The guitar body didn't smell from the day after I sprayed it! But it's still soft!
     
  16. sansa

    sansa

    Feb 20, 2013
    I didn't understand a thing man....You have to be more definite. I'm sorry I'm italian :)

    Anyway very funny name! :D
     
  17. sansa

    sansa

    Feb 20, 2013
    really good advise! did you ever try the razor blade?
    Then I'll polish it with a medium sponge pad.
     
  18. sansa

    sansa

    Feb 20, 2013
    what's a "cabinet scraper"?
     
  19. sansa

    sansa

    Feb 20, 2013
    .
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    .
    .
    Anyway my two real questions are:
    1.Can I circumscribe the area with bodyshop tape and the sand? is there a good tape for sanding?
    2. Can I do it with polish or cutting compounds?
     
  20. Beej

    Beej

    Feb 10, 2007
    Victoria, BC
    Sansa, a couple of things. First off, please fill out some of your profile, it helps others understand your point of view and saves some of the problems when translating.

    To answer your questions:
    1. yes, but there is no point, you don't need to tape it off before sanding the entire bass will need to be sanded anyway.
    1. No, they are not abrasive enough to fix this level of problem.

    Generally, your lacquer will take about 14 days or maybe more to completely cure. Curing is different than drying. It needs to be cured to finish the procedure.

    Let us know how it goes! :)
     

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