Lakland 55-94 best settings for internal controls

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by bassbloke, Aug 5, 2002.

  1. bassbloke


    Feb 26, 2002
    Mid range dipswitch and preamp input gain trimmer. Any thoughts on how these are best set and what difference it makes to the sound?

    Mine arrived with the dipswitch at 500Hz and the pre-amp set fairly loud (I think). There is a nasal sounding punchiness to the D string I'm not overly keen on. Any Lakland owners like to share thoughts/experiences?
  2. rickbass

    rickbass Supporting Member

    If you don't mind hearing some input from a lowly Skyline 55-02 owner (since we have the same electronics) -

    I asked Lakin a little about it because I don't like "nasality" either, nor, "boxiness" that mids can produce. I was confused by the fact that, to me, "mids are mids." In my mind, they're a certain range of frequencies between the highest and lowest Hz's the instrument can physically produce. Maybe the dip settings affect how the mids knob behaves....I don't know, I never use any mids knob much since I need deep, clear, bass most often, not punch.

    Basically, he told me to use the 250Hz setting to get the most deep bass out of the instrument.

    What's helped me eliminate some of the "nasal punch" is;

    - setting the dip switch at 250Hz's as Dan reco'd
    - using "bassier" strings (I've tried 4 different sets so far and will probably try some TI's on it next)
    - using the Mids pot very conservatively
    - slightly favoring the J/neck pup with the Blend control
    - raising the J/neck pup closer to the higher strings than the MM-style pup

    I should try stringing just through the bridge and not through the body and see if the less severe break angle over the saddles has a noticeable effect.

    Since mine has an all-swamp ash body with a maple fretboard, it produces punch like Lennox Lewis.
  3. bassbloke


    Feb 26, 2002
    Thanks Rick. I am looking for quite a punchy sound because I play in a band that covers Chic, EWF etc. But the nasal sound that also makes the D string in particular sound louder and more sustained than other strings I don't like.

    If I set the mid dipswitch to 250 or 850 (highest or lowest) the nasality does seem to go but I'm not sure what the effect on the sound in a full gig situation would be. I'm wary of extreme sounds and feel that one of the middle settings SHOULD be best.
  4. rickbass

    rickbass Supporting Member

    That's exactly what I found, bloke - the two most extreme settings were those that worked best for me.

    While I firmly believe "factory settings" and strings are most often those that a high quality maker feels brings out the best in their instruments, they are also done to please the largest number of owners. I'm aware that what I like best is rarely "mainstream" so I always plan on tweaking.

    In gig situations at clubs, using a full stack w/15" or 18" and some 10's, I found the thing I have to look out for with the 250Hz setting is not to be too overowering and "booming" like a bomb going off and having my D and G strings "disappear." Consequently, ever since I went to the 250Hz setting, my preamp and pedal settings have changed somewhat.
  5. Munjibunga

    Munjibunga Total Hyper-Elite Member Gold Supporting Member

    May 6, 2000
    San Diego (when not at Groom Lake)
    Independent Contractor to Bass San Diego
    I stick with 700 hz on both my fretted and fretless basses. Boost gives you a nice J-type growl on the bridge pickup, and cut gives you Nathan East's smiley tone. What more could you want?
  6. bassbloke


    Feb 26, 2002
    Thanks a lot for taking the time guys, this is useful information.