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Lakland Skyline question

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by GreyBeard, Sep 17, 2002.


  1. What is the difference between models with NTMB electronics and those without (other than about $250.00)
     
  2. The only Skyline with non-US electronics is the 55-01.

    I spent about an hour and a half in the Lakland factory last Friday playing everything Dan had - and was highly impressed by all the Skylines. Build quality and fretwork was on par with US Laklands.

    I played them all - and although I'm really nitpicking here I didn't like the 55-01's tone as well as the basses with US electronics. The 55-01 is a hell of a bass in its own right - but wouldn't be my first choice. Playability on any of the Skylines is just great. If you blindfolded me I don't think I could tell a US model from a Korean one (except for the 55-01 which has no US counterpart - and a pretty distinctive tone).

    Most of the people I know who have played both the 55-01 and 55-02 prefer the more expensive Skyline. The Korean electronics are pretty good for any bass - but IMO the US electronics are quite a bit better - and well worth the $250.
     
  3. Showdown

    Showdown Supporting Member

    Jan 21, 2002
    Honolulu, Hawaii
    I like the 55-01 better. I like the sound of two soapbars better than the mm/jazz configuration, I think it is more versatile.

    Also, I have a Tobias with the US Bartolini preamp, and the Skyline sounds BETTER in a side by side test. I think the difference in woods (swamp ash vs. maple) and construction (bolt on vs. neck through) makes a bigger difference in the sound than the preamps. Of course YMMV....
     
  4. I've played both the stock 55-01 and the stock 55-02, although I have NOT played the 55-01 with upgraded Bart preamp.

    IMO, if you're looking for an aggressive, crunchy Stingray tone, the 55-01 nails that sound BETTER than the 55-02. I know that's counter-intuitive, because the 55-02 is the one with the Stingray-shaped pickup, but the 55-02 sounded much smoother to me.

    I loved the 55-01's I played.
     
  5. rickbass

    rickbass Supporting Member

    What Jordan says makes sense, in that, Lakin's vision of the 55-94, (which is what the 55-02 is a clone of), has always been a marriage of the richness of a Jazz and the percussive aggression of the Ray.

    Still, in the 8 months I've owned my 55-02, I've been trying various strings in attempt to tone down it's incredibly punchy, percussive, raw, tone while preserving its full-throated, big bottom.

    The 55-02 is very versatile compared to the one-trick-pony Stingray.
     
  6. grizzwell

    grizzwell

    Feb 22, 2002
    Honolulu
    The 55-02 is very versatile compared to the one-trick-pony Stingray.



    You said a mouthful.
     
  7. adrian garcia

    adrian garcia

    Apr 9, 2001
    las vegas. nevada
    Endorsing Artist: Nordy Basses, Schroeder Cabs, Gallien Krueger Amps
    while i will agree that the 55-01 is more aggresive than the 55-02 - i totally disaggree that 2 soapbars are more versatile than the mm/j - having said that- what never seemed to make much sense to me is adding a us bart pre to the 55-01 - the mk1 pre sounds great all by itself- if you want the us pre and pups- i suggest just going with the 55-02 because, well. I just think the mm/j pups are more versatile - but this is just my opinion, and what do i know??:D
     
  8. Showdown

    Showdown Supporting Member

    Jan 21, 2002
    Honolulu, Hawaii
    Let me clarify what I meant by "versatile", maybe I used the wrong word. To me, the MM/J configuration has a distinct "Lakland" sound, while the soapbar configuration is more generic, and can IMO reproduce more standard tones than the MM/J. I have 5 basses with soapbar pickups, it is one of the more common configurations, and one that I am used to. Of course YMMV.