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Lane Poor Owners: Need Help

Discussion in 'Pickups & Electronics [BG]' started by Saint, Apr 11, 2004.


  1. Saint

    Saint

    Mar 2, 2000
    DC - USA
    I have 2 lane poor humbuckers and need to know if there is any way to wire them for series/parallel or coil tap switches. Thanks!
     
  2. Ívar Þórólfsson

    Ívar Þórólfsson Mmmmmm... Supporting Member

    Apr 9, 2001
    Kopavogur, Iceland

    Have you searched yet?

    I did a quick little search with the keywords humbucker series and I found a lot of threads.

    May the search be with you!

    Edit: Fixed your thread title, the bold syntax does not work in thread titles.
     
  3. luknfur

    luknfur

    Jan 14, 2004
    DIXIE
    Yep, you can series/parallel wire them (and there's plenty of info on the net) but they have to be coil tap pups for that. If they're four lead pups you can split the coils and I've found that to be a great way to go for HBs.
     
  4. Saint

    Saint

    Mar 2, 2000
    DC - USA
    Thanks for the info.

    Unfortunately the Lane Poors HB's I have appear only come with a red lead, a black lead, and a ground. Am I missing something?
     
  5. Saint

    Saint

    Mar 2, 2000
    DC - USA
    Thanks for fixing the thread title. With regard to the search, I actually did spend about 20minutes searching prior to posting, but didn't find anything that related directly to Lane Poors with regard to series/parallel.
     
  6. luknfur

    luknfur

    Jan 14, 2004
    DIXIE
    Nope, not missing anything. Different pups are just wired different. Actually, you should still be able to split the coils. The Barts M34C's I had just happened to be 4 wire. Go to the bartolini.net, electronics and look under switching for dual coils. With the 4 wire you just pair the wires up so you should be able to just run your single leads to where the pairs go. I used the one with the DPDT on-off-on switch - good variety of useful tones that are quite different. HB and two different J tones - all dead quiet. Sold the bass and the guy that got it can't stop playing it. The bass had the same pups with a different wiring scheme in when I got it and it sucked so bad I nearly got rid of the pups. Even stuck an TCT then an NTMB w/mid switch in it and it was still unimpressive - to me anyway.

    I used a les paul vol/vol/tone/tone wiring scheme with 47mfd capicitor to one pup and 104 mfd to the other. The tones were interactive with each volume and each other so you could actually blend the two varying capacitor bleeds for either or both pups. Between the switch and the tone setup, you could get an amazing array of tone out of that bass with very little wiring. Another cool part was by maxing one tone and zeroing out the other, then reversing the process, you could tell the difference in tone those two different capacitor values make to the sound. Highly remmended rigging.

    As for your search, wiring is wiring regardless of the pup manufacturer. It's the way manufacturer wired the pup that makes the difference.
     
  7. Saint

    Saint

    Mar 2, 2000
    DC - USA
    thanks luknfur.
     
  8. If the LP humbuckers have only three wires you cannot use series/parallel wiring on the individual pickups. The coils are wired together internally. You need a four wire output for that (or four wires plus ground).

    So, that leaves the regular series/parallel wiring of two pickups together. You might want to experiment with it before drilling holes in your bass to see if the tone options are worth the trouble.

    I have pair of LP M3.5Ws in my Hamer 12-string, and they are great sounding pickups (wide aperture coils).
     
  9. luknfur

    luknfur

    Jan 14, 2004
    DIXIE
    "You might want to experiment with it before drilling holes in your bass to see if the tone options are worth the trouble."

    2nd the motion for sure. In fact I'd say, definitely rig it up outside the bass before making any modifications to the bass. I haven't messed with it much but I haven't found a series/parallel sound yet I'd keep. Doesn't mean there aren't plenty of them worthwhile out there. But I'd get the sound down and then decide how I could go about actually installing it - preferably in a way that you can remove it and restore the bass to it's original order and sell them as you bought them cause they'll be worth more that way. Or you could keep the transplants and stick them in something else.

    Even cheap basses I go to some length to avoid ANY permanent modification that will show. Usually, you can work around the existing config if it has at least 3 pots. Most switching I've found I settle on one choice anyway - for that you can either leave the switch in the bay or eliminate it all togehter. A lot of harnesses have trim pots and dips you have to go into the bay for so what's the difference.
     
  10. Saint

    Saint

    Mar 2, 2000
    DC - USA
    I see what you mean about series/parallel. However, what if I wire the black (which I assume to be the hot lead) to the top of an SPDT switch, the red to the bottom and run a wire from the middle position out to the pre-amp (ground wire gets grounded, of course). Won't this give me a single coil/parallel/single coil configuration?
     
  11. luknfur

    luknfur

    Jan 14, 2004
    DIXIE
    For what it's worth, meant to add this other day, but even when I know exactly what I'm going to do, I make up a board with the same layout that will be on the bass (exact pot/switch locations I mean). I wire the board up and test it for any bugs. If it's good to go, it drops right in and if not, any diagnosing or changes are easily made cause everythings out in the open.
     
  12. No, that wiring scheme shouldn't make any sound at all.

    You simply can't get series/parallel with only a black and a red wire.

    The black and red wires are connected inside the pickup to the two coils which are already internally wired either series or parallel (probably series). The red and black need to both be connected in order to have the pickup coils complete the circuit. The ground is not part of the circuit; it just provides a ground plane to reduce noise. In order to do what you want you either need to buy another pickup with four output wires (two from each coil) or hack open the Lane Poor humbucker and rewire it (not at all recommended).

    Your LP humbuckers use two internal coils that are pre-wired inside. You can't separate them like a Bartolini which has separate leads coming from each coil that you can connect any way you like.

    If you still want to do some sort of series/parallel switching it will have to be by connecting both pickups together in series or parallel. The individual pickups cannot be wired in this way.

    You might want to read this:

    http://www.guitarnuts.com/wiring/sw3.php
     
  13. Saint

    Saint

    Mar 2, 2000
    DC - USA
    Thanks 12bass and everyone else. This has been very helpful.
     
  14. You're welcome!

    Enjoy your Lane Poors, they are great pickups!!!
     
  15. JRBrown

    JRBrown

    Jun 21, 2000
    North Carolina
    What's the final?

    Is the red or black lead "hot"?

    JB
     
  16. David Wilson

    David Wilson Administrator Staff Member Administrator Supporting Member

    Oct 14, 2002
    Lower Westchester, NY
    my best guess would be red is hot
    looking at the thread in the basses forum, you went for it anyway!
    Was red hot?
     
  17. JRBrown

    JRBrown

    Jun 21, 2000
    North Carolina
    Sure did. A local dealer has a Lane Poor equiped bass for sale. He pulled the cover and gave me the wiring details.

    - Earlier in this or another thread, someone said the "black" was hot. With Barts, the black "could" be hot.

    The Lane Poors rock...so far. :)
     
  18. Saint

    Saint

    Mar 2, 2000
    DC - USA
    So the red is hot?
     
  19. JRBrown

    JRBrown

    Jun 21, 2000
    North Carolina
    My setup: Red = hot, Black and shield = ground