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Late 60s Japanese telecaster bass

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by BigBruddah, Jul 16, 2014.


  1. BigBruddah

    BigBruddah

    Jul 16, 2014
    I just bought this bass off of Craigslist for 10 dollars
    It's has no name but the woman said it was from the late 60s. Does anyone know anything about this bass?
     

    Attached Files:

  2. BigBruddah

    BigBruddah

    Jul 16, 2014
    4ef151e8-2442-4385-8897-5798c3567288. 4f7f01b2-1e70-4f7e-a51c-932f00db8c1c. 522e635c-6580-4303-8455-613860c35544. 4ef151e8-2442-4385-8897-5798c3567288. 4f7f01b2-1e70-4f7e-a51c-932f00db8c1c. 522e635c-6580-4303-8455-613860c35544.
     
  3. Wow what a deal!
     
  4. BigBruddah

    BigBruddah

    Jul 16, 2014
    Any info on it?
     
  5. It's just the standard 60's Japanese bass made in the Matsumoku factory. Neck looks to be all mahogany. Not much else to it.
     
  6. See my reply in "Anyone own a 70s P-Bass?"

    And upon what is the Matsumoku attribution based? Evidence?
     
  7. JIO

    JIO Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jun 30, 2010
    Oceana (Pacifica) CA
    musician/artist/owner - Gildaxe
    A shot of the neck plate would possibly help identify it - goggle "vintage japanese basses" and see if you can find a relative. As long as the neck isn't warped, you can easily build it up to be a cool little bass. It looks like the top rout was for a pu switch.
     
  8. [Migrated from the 70's P-bass thread]


    Ten dollars!?!?! Ohhh! You low-life scoundrel! ;) The non-wood parts are worth that. Actually,

    1) This is an upgraded copy of a second-generation P-bass, not a T-bass.

    2) Odds favor it being pre-1966 rather than post-1966.

    3) When new, it probably had a three-color sunburst finish on the body top and headstock and back of the neck, with the body back and edges being black. Other factory finish options I have seen are the same pattern in red-burst and the "surfer special" in all teal (a painted on finish).

    4) The neck is thick because it is mahogany, not maple. The neck is heavy because, being mahogany, in addition to the adjustable truss rod it has two steel reinforcing rods.

    5) Neckplate probably is a five-bolter.

    6) When new, your bass probably looked a lot like this

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/231269630998?ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1423.l2649

    although "this" probably is a custom refinish. I know I've never before seen a finish like this on one of these basses. [Edit: I *have* seen these basses in a bright red finish.]

    As to the restore:

    Getting your bass refinished to a stock color (of your choosing) probably will be the easiest thing. There are enough photos (although still not a lot) of these basses floating around the webiverse to give you some ideas. Bridge and tuners look to be original, although the bridge cover is missing. Ditto the fingerrest/tugbar. Can't help you with pots and wiring; do you really want that degree of restoration back to original spec? Based on my experiences, these basses can be complete and original and still be wired wrong. The gold-foil pickups -- if you can find them at all -- are likely to be expensive. A shame, because they have "their" sound. And you will need a pair of rocker switches for that route in the bottom cutaway. These sometimes show up on eBay as part of an entire loaded control plate. Since yours is a two-pickup bass, the original pickguard likely was chrome plated rather than brushed aluminum. You may have to enlist the services of a machine shop to obtain a replacement. There is some variation on these basses with knobs and tuners, so you have some options on the (three) control knobs.
     
    JIO likes this.
  9. BigBruddah

    BigBruddah

    Jul 16, 2014
    Is it possible that Sam ash can do the full repair?
     
  10. Maybe if Sam Ash has a time machine. Sam Ash can make it giggable; but I would be surprised if Sam Ash even knows what the original parts for this would be, never mind the much harder task of finding them. Forget the national big box chain. Look for a vintage specialist.
     
  11. JIO likes this.
  12. BigBruddah

    BigBruddah

    Jul 16, 2014
    What's the actual model name?
     
  13. BigBruddah likes this.

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