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Learn To Read, People!

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by brianrost, Sep 18, 2005.


  1. emjazz

    emjazz Supporting Member

    Feb 23, 2003
    Brooklyn, NY
    The only thing that I can say here is take it slow. It's not a contest and we all learn at different rates. Find one book to start with and start with 15 minutes, twice a day, that's it. Increase the time as you become more comfortable. Consistency is the only way to learn properly. Finding a good teacher is a big help as well. They can steer you in the right direction and keep you on task.
     
  2. Phil Smith

    Phil Smith Mr Sumisu 2 U

    May 30, 2000
    Peoples Republic of Brooklyn
    Creator of: iGigBook for Android/iOS
    Reading is like a muscle, you must excercise it, in other words, read as much as you can. The more you read, the better you will get.
     
  3. Pacman

    Pacman Layin' Down Time Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 1, 2000
    Omaha, Nebraska
    Endorsing Artist: Roscoe Guitars, DR Strings, Aguilar Amplification
    This is as true as it gets - read. alot. every day.

    But I'll add this. Don't just 'sight read' daily - take time to learn the material you're reading. This cements in the patterns of notes, the bigger chunks of lines that help you read ahead. It will help you read faster and more accurately.

    But really...

    Read.

    A lot.

    Every day.


    Do that, and I promise you'll get better.
     
  4. emjazz

    emjazz Supporting Member

    Feb 23, 2003
    Brooklyn, NY
    Hey y'all. Thanks for the tip on the Back Cello Suites. Just got here. I'm looking forward to starting the 1st suite today.
     
  5. chardin

    chardin

    Sep 18, 2000
    I'm concerned that reading the same piece over and over will soon lead to memorization. At what point should I put a piece aside and switch to something else?

    By the way, I'm using Band In A Box for improving my reading because it can create a brand new song with one button press. I'm at the beginning stages so I've told BIAB to generate bass lines with mostly half notes and an occasional quarter and eighth note run. I read and play the song 3 or 4 times and generate a new one. If I feel brave I go to the key of F or G.
     
  6. Wrong Robot

    Wrong Robot Guest

    Apr 8, 2002

    There is still a lot to be learned from 'memorizing' a piece. Even if you have it memorized, you can still read along with it and it will still help you reading. The key is to keep reading it even if it's memorized, because you might find a point that you memorized incorrectly, or, you might refine your fingerings, or you might see something you didn't see before.

    I've found that, while there is some level of memorization that is going to happen no matter what. If you really are focusing on the reading, and less so on the end result of how it sounds, you're less likely to actually memorize it in a detrimental way.
     
  7. emjazz

    emjazz Supporting Member

    Feb 23, 2003
    Brooklyn, NY
    Well said!
     
  8. Commreman

    Commreman Faith, Family, Fitness, and Frets Supporting Member

    Feb 12, 2005
    New Jersey
    No problem, I'm glad I could help. Take your time with them. Each line deals with repeated patterns, and you will find that the fingerings are somewhat challenging. You will use open notes as well. The trick is to use cello-like phrasing when you play these. If you don't play 5 string, there will be sections that have repeated notes you will have to play up an octave. I originally tackled these on four string, so it can be done. This music is beautiful, and I constantly come back to this book. Another Bach piece you might want to try on bass are the two part piano inventions.

    I want to pick up the Arban's Trombone Method. Anything reccommended by Jeff Berlin is definitely worth checking out!
     
  9. emjazz

    emjazz Supporting Member

    Feb 23, 2003
    Brooklyn, NY
    I play six string so it's much easier.

    I can see what you mean about using open strings. I almost never use open strings but there really isn't a choice with these pieces. I also noticed the tricky fingerings and interval jumps. Great stuff though.
     
  10. Pacman

    Pacman Layin' Down Time Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 1, 2000
    Omaha, Nebraska
    Endorsing Artist: Roscoe Guitars, DR Strings, Aguilar Amplification
    Since you play 6, you might consider transposing everything up an octave. Then you're playing it at pitch, and it sounds much better. Check out John Patitucci's prelude to the suite in G. Fantastic stuff!
     
  11. When you guys talk about charts, are you talking about the melody written out with chords above, or are you talking "nashville" charts? I have tons of exp with the former, none with the latter. In 10 years I've never had to read from a nashville chart, but I need to learn and get it to be second nature just in case.....
     
  12. Well, looks like I went and killed it...... :crying: :bag:
     
  13. quallabone

    quallabone

    Aug 2, 2003
    Yes!

    I think we're talking about music with...
    -Written Bass lines
    -Number Charts
    -Chord charts
    -lead sheet
     
  14. burntgorilla

    burntgorilla

    Jan 24, 2005
    Belfast
    I recently got some book tokens (about £30 worth) so I think I'll get some of these. I want one with longevity, but I'm sure either will do (unless they're less than £30 together). Would you recommend the Bach or the trombone one, if you had to have one?

    Also, do online retailers accept book tokens? I think the cashier has to sign them or something, so I doubt it, but none of the shops near me stock books like this.
     
  15. emjazz

    emjazz Supporting Member

    Feb 23, 2003
    Brooklyn, NY
    I'm really encouraged by the progress that I've already had with the cello suites. Great book. It's something I can see myself working on for a good while. There is a ton of music in here. Beautifull pieces. The 1st suite is instantly recognizable. I'm pretty sure I have a recording of Bill Frisell playing this piece in the beginning of a tune with an electric trio live.
     
  16. Commreman

    Commreman Faith, Family, Fitness, and Frets Supporting Member

    Feb 12, 2005
    New Jersey
    I first learned these in 1988, then put them down for a while. You'll find that as you come back, you will make new distinctions and glean more from them as your overall musical knowledge increases, and, not to sound overly philosophical, your life experience increases. If the only thing that the Bach Cello suites does for you now is to get you to think a little differently about what you can do melodically with what is normally considered a support or "goove" instrument, then it will be time well spent for you. Improving your reading chops is just a plus here. Have fun!
     
  17. thewanderer24

    thewanderer24

    Apr 29, 2002
    SJ, CA
    I've just gotten to the end of the Mel Bay note reading for bass book, and am still far from comfortable sight reading anything but the easiest charts. I can figure most things out that are written in bass cleff with a little time, but I still have a long way to go with "sight reading."

    Thanks to your guys' recommendations, I ordered the Bach Cello Suites. Just shipped today. I'm looking forward to getting rolling on it.

    After talking to some other folks, I realized part of learning to read is picking up any music you see and just trying to sight read it, so I've been trying to sight read from random pages in the real books as well as other transcriptions I have.

    What amazes me is how certain bass lines I consider very easy to play, drive me nuts when I see them written out. It's cool, though trying to sight read something I know how to play by ear, because it lets me know how much feel really does play a part in it all.
     
  18. Commreman

    Commreman Faith, Family, Fitness, and Frets Supporting Member

    Feb 12, 2005
    New Jersey
    Wanderer - Also order "Standing in the Shadows of Motown". It has everything from basic to bizarre in it, and will absolutely improve your reading chops if you use it regularly.

    The key to reading is to just do it - every day. If you get to a tricky rhythm, just tap it out until it flows, and then add the notes.

    While Jeff Berlin is either loved or hated around here (I personally fall into the frormer category), he had one of the greatest quotes on this topic - "No reading, no music, know reading, know music". I think that pretty much sums it up.
     
  19. thewanderer24

    thewanderer24

    Apr 29, 2002
    SJ, CA
    I own SSOM already, and that was one of the ones I was referring to with reading stuff I already know (I play some of those songs in bands). I was trying to read Bernadette today at lunch time. :eek: :crying: I'm a loooong way off from that one!!

    Trying to read some of that Jamerson stuff at speed with all the really syncopated rhythms and unexpected note choices is maddening. But I can slowly see progress. I just have to keep forcing myself to do it every day for at least 15 minutes outside of my normal practice routine.
     
  20. emjazz

    emjazz Supporting Member

    Feb 23, 2003
    Brooklyn, NY
    Standing in the Shadows of Motown huh? I'll have to get that one. I can see how the rhythms of those bass lines would be challenging to read.
     

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