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Learning method idea

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by cvictorh, Apr 18, 2009.


  1. cvictorh

    cvictorh

    Feb 14, 2009
    Mid-Michigan
    I just started playing bass about two months ago and my problem is that I just don't seem to be playing enough. I currently am just learning tabs but I have recently ordered some music theory books. Do you guys think it would be a practical idea to learn technique primarily through improv with stuff I learn from the theory books? I would still play some tabs and want to try and dig out my trombone books if I still have them to work on sight reading but I just don't feel like I'm accomplishing much by just regurgitating songs others have written.
     
  2. Stumbo

    Stumbo Wherever you go, there you are. Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 11, 2008
    Cali Intergalactic Mind Space - always on the edge
    Song Surgeon slow downer software- full 4 hour demo
    You mean noodling? You could do it, but since you don't know what you don't know, how will you get to where you want to go?

    How about finding a teacher?

    Or check out the link in my sig. your some info that may help.

    Good luck.
     
  3. cvictorh

    cvictorh

    Feb 14, 2009
    Mid-Michigan
    I have read a lot of that already and I will still look around at how-tos on diffrent techniques I qould just play them while trying out improvs rather than try beginnning songs someone wrote and them harder songs someone wrote and on and on. I may get a teacher this summer atleast for a few lessons but for now I don't have transportation to get to the local guitar shop and they seem like really reputable teachers there. There website is www.elderly.com if anyone from mid-michigan wants to check them out. Not the greatest selection but really knoweldgable they cater more towards vintage and have a lot of less common stringed instruments like dulcimers and such. But back on topic I would still look up many techniques I just get bored playing them in songs already written and sometimes it causes irritation if its a song I really like and I can't get the technique down. This way I can work on technique, theory, and improv at once. If anyone from mid-michigan on here is willing to drive to give somewhat cheap lessons I would be willing to do that but until I save up for a car I can't drive to them.
     
  4. afromoose

    afromoose Guest

    For improv without it being tied to chord changes, or part of a style, and not just free, I found the Flea master class dvd really inspiring when I was starting out. There's not much actual instruction, since he's just explaining his approach, but it's good food for thought I think. I think you can probably watch it on youtube.
     
  5. MadMan118

    MadMan118

    Jan 10, 2008
    Vallejo, CA
    Get a good teacher first off. As for method books I would suggest the Hal Leonard Bass Method book, which IMO is great for applying method and fluent reading technique to bass instruction. However I suggest a teacher above all.
     
  6. Tehrin Cole

    Tehrin Cole

    Mar 6, 2009
    Brooklyn,New York
    Endorsing Artist:Kustom Amplifiers
    Just a few questions:Are you familiar with your tuning?When you're"noodling",are you listening to any recordings?In other words,how much do you know about your instrument,in the short time that you've been playing?Getting a good teacher is definitely,a great idea,...they'll help you with things such as tuning,technique,reading,as well as theory,and they'll recommend material to study,....there's tons of it!While you're searching for a teacher,I recommend that you listen to your favorite recordings,and try to emulate what they do,...this will give you a head start for training your ear.Afterall,music is first,and foremost,an"ears"concept.This will also give you a"working knowledge"of the instrument,which is great for any perspective teacher because this tells us where you already are,and where we need to pick it up from.Most good players can,already play before they learn reading and theory,and if you can do that,then a good teacher will help you to"fill in the blanks",so to speak.So good luck,have fun,and keep me posted,....and if you live in NYC,click on my name,and you should see my E-mail address,....I'm also a teacher! Peace!
     

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