Psst... Ready to join TalkBass and start posting, make new friends, sell your gear, and more?  Register your free account in 30 seconds.

Lefty loosie, righty tighty??? Truss rod left or right to lower action?

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by rickreyn, Sep 7, 2002.


Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. rickreyn

    rickreyn

    Jun 16, 2000
    Lutz, Florida
    I want to take a crack at lowering the action on my new Lakland 55-94 5. Before I do, I'd like to know which way to turn the truss rod, clockwise or counter clockwise? This will same me a pro setup fee. Will I have to adjust each one of the saddles? All I want is to take a little forward bow out.
     
  2. pkr2

    pkr2

    Apr 28, 2000
    coastal N.C.
    Simply answered, tighten (clockwise) to remove forward bow.

    Also simply stated: If you don't already know which way to turn it, you shouldn't do it. At least not without studying the mechanics of setup.

    By the way, the truss rod is not an action adjustment!

    Adjust the saddles first.

    A little time in the search function of TB, keyword setup will yield a lot of good info. It will also yield a lot of misleading info.

    How to tell the difference? Beats the heck out of me.

    A web search will also provide a lot of good info.

    Fender has a good web site on set up.

    Pkr2
     
  3. rickreyn

    rickreyn

    Jun 16, 2000
    Lutz, Florida
    Thanks. I'd rather spend my time practicing then in getting my guitar further out of whack, which is what will happen! Or at least I won't be confident in what I have done.
     
  4. nivagues

    nivagues

    Jan 18, 2002
    Check out the Roger Sadowsky web site. Very informative for Bass setup.
    Cheers. :cool:
     
  5. rickreyn

    rickreyn

    Jun 16, 2000
    Lutz, Florida
    Through trial and error, set the action lower myself. Lessons. Clockwise up, counterclockwise down. Tuning must be adjusted with each adjustment. There is a radius to the neck. I am now more confortable playing the bass now that my left hand fingers don't have to work so hard pressing down the strings. I must have done something right. I saved $20 bucks.
     
  6. fivestringdan

    fivestringdan Supporting Member

    Dec 4, 2001
    Little Rock, AR
    pedulla basses are backwards!!!!

    Lookout!!!
     
  7. Warwicks can be either way - depends on how the truss-rod was put in (check their web-site for full details of how to tell). Just remember to only adjust a quarter of a turn at a time, and let it settle before further adjustments.

    - Wil
     
  8. basically, you should always go slow when turning any trussrod. The direction can depend on single or double action, the end of the neck that the truss rod adjustment is made etc.

    I would check the website of Lakland and they should have that info there. Pedulla gives you a rather comprehensive manual and an adjustment tool with every bass........

    But if you just turn it 1/4 turn or less each way, you shouldn't hurt your neck at all. You can then figure out which way it goes. But depending on the amount of relief your bass had when it was set up, you may ahve to redo the intonation and saddle height as well.

    The order should be neck adjustment, saddle height adjustment (if needed) and intonation (if needed).
     
  9. pd_5string

    pd_5string Admin: Accnt Disabled

    Jan 23, 2002
    NY
    Depends.

    Single action truss rods, righty tighty, left loosy.

    Otherwise, you need to consult your manual.

    Never turn the truss rod screw more than 1/4 turn at a time. When tightening, loosen 1/4 turn, then come back a 1/4 turn, and then tighten 1/4 a turn. Strum the strings agressively, and/or lightly tap the back of the neck up and down to get things to settle in faster. Even when you finally get things where you want them, it may take a few hours for things to settle in. Re-tune and check out how it feels. The frets should NOT buzz more in one section of the neck vs another. If so, this is an indication that the neck is too convex or too concave.

    Also, truss rods are NOT action adjustments. I should put this in my signature. Truss rods are set within a range depending on your playing pressure at between ~.014-.018" (some may go outside of this but it is the exception and certainly not the rule). Try .015" first, and go from there. Changing string gauges will affect relief.

    Get yourself a straight edge at http://www.stew-mac.com and a set of feeler gauges. Measure at the 8th fret.

    Once you get this set, you THEN raise/lower your strings. It is also a good idea to get a 6" r uler that has 1/64" increments. You can then set the bass up to what feels good, and take some measurements, write them down, and again if things go out of kilter, you can return back. For example, my personal stats are:

    .015" relief

    4/64" on the G string, gradually increasing to 5/64" on the E/B strings.

    Otherwise, you chase your tail. This is a much faster way to set your bass up, and if things get out of whack, it allows you to return back to your "stats" quicker.
     
  10. rickreyn

    rickreyn

    Jun 16, 2000
    Lutz, Florida
    :)
     
  11. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    Rick you go ahead and use the truss rod for action adjustments - I do it all the time!

    We buy the bass - we can do what we like with it, nobody can tell us what to do!! ;)

    Don't listen to anybody who tells you otherwise! :rolleyes:
     
  12. pd_5string

    pd_5string Admin: Accnt Disabled

    Jan 23, 2002
    NY
    You can break your guitar for all I care...just trying to be of help.
     
  13. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    Oooohh! Tetchy! ;)
     
  14. pd_5string

    pd_5string Admin: Accnt Disabled

    Jan 23, 2002
    NY
    Not at all :D

    Just that it is silly to insist that truss rods are to be used to raise or lower your strings, (which flies in the face of well respected luthiers) but if that is how you like to operate, I can't/won't stop you. I will only provide my and other well known luthiers' opinions that truss rods are NOT supposed to be used to raise or lower strings.

    If others in this forum would like to believe you rather than said luthiers, that is their prerogative.
     
  15. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    Well - I think nothing's that black and white - you can quote all the sources you like - but if Rick or I do something and it works, then I'm sure we are going to take more account of that than somebody trying to tell us we're wrong!

    I have discussed this a few times with the bass tech at the Bass centre in London and he explained it that if you adjust the truss rod, it can mean that you can get lower actrion higher up the neck or close to the nut, for example, depending on how you set it - experimenting with this means you end up with a setting that suits you.

    Of course luthiers will have standard settings amd processes for making quick and accurate adjustments, but that doesn't mean that we as players need to follow what they do.

    So when I have tried basses set up by pros I find it's OK but not exactly how I want it. It usually takes me quite a while of fiddling to get the set up exactly how I want it, but I think this is a useful process to go through as it allows me to feel all the possibilities of your bass in terms of action.

    If I just went by how a luthier told me, then I would be missing out on all the variations, which can be quite extreme on some basses !
     
  16. pd_5string

    pd_5string Admin: Accnt Disabled

    Jan 23, 2002
    NY
    "Nothing is Black and White."

    This statement is self-defeating.

    I too was once a "adjust by feel" player...always screwed around with my setup all the time, and wasted a lot of time then if I actually knew how to setup my bass. Most have too much pride to admit they really don't know how to do it. I would suggest that if you(pl.) don't have a ruler, feeler gauges, and a good straight edge/or capo, you don't know what you are doing, and couldn't reproduce your current settings achieved by feel if things got out of whack.
     
  17. nivagues

    nivagues

    Jan 18, 2002
    Bruce,
    Of course anyone can adjust their Bass the way they want and no one is stopping them...pd is only making an observation in his responce to the initial post and IMO he's 100% correct.
    Cheers.
     
  18. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    You are so wrong - in so many ways!! :D
     
  19. pkr2

    pkr2

    Apr 28, 2000
    coastal N.C.
    Can anybody smell a troll?

    :mad:

    Pkr2
     
  20. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    Yup - about 4 posts up from here!! ;)
     



Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.