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Lessons: starting from scratch or not?

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by JDT, Jul 26, 2005.


  1. I'm not sure if this is the right place, feel free to move it off.

    I'm currently taking lessons, but it's a private-lesson thing, meaning it's me and 3 other guys, and we can ask the teacher what we want to do. 1 hour every week. (and I can't get the lessons I want from that guy because of the other guys and the 1-hour-per-week limit).

    Now, I want to learn everything about music and theory etc. I'm in a band now, I'm creating my own lines, but I feel like I don't know anything about the theory that goes into it. I'm wondering weather or not I should go and take the 10-year lesson programme (I'm *not* kidding, it takes this long) that kids get when they want to start playing. Adults can take the same lessons separatly. But this means starting from scratch (beginning with 3 years of learning to read standard notation - which I want to anyway), and I'm a little scared to be taking lessons that probably (I'll verify this) won't have me playing my instrument for some time.

    Is there anyone else who does or did the same thing? Any reason to do/not to do this?
     
  2. I'm a little confused. What is this ten year program that kids get? Where do you (take | plan to take) lessons?

    If I'm understanding you right about the teacher you're currently with, he doesn't give one-on-one lessons, which seems a little odd. You may want to find a different teacher if he can't or won't teach you in the way you want.
     
  3. Bassist4Life

    Bassist4Life

    Dec 17, 2004
    Buffalo, NY
    JDT,

    It sounds like you primary focus is to learn theory. Are there any colleges or community programs in your area that offer music theory classes? Learning to read music doesn't take that long. Learning theory through private instruction can be VERY expensive. If there are no classes available, you can get a beginner theory book. Don't feel like to have to learn everything all at once. Take your time. Move at your own pace.

    Take your bass lessons to learn your instrument and some theory applications. Seek out as many musical experiences as possible.

    Good Luck,
    Joe
     
  4. The 10-year thing is what most kids do when they play an instrument here, I'm not sure what it's like in other countries. It starts with 4 years of learning to read music while you're in primairy school, and then you get to pick your instrument and go another 6 years. It's also a requirement if you want to go to a conservatory. I think it's the music education the government provides. You take lessons for it at a conservatory, and if you make it you can play most of the classical pieces written for your instrument (there's an option of jazz/lighter music too, but that's only been added recently I think).

    The reason I want to take those classes is that there's no other way I can learn theory with a teacher, unless I'm paying for private education which can get very expensive.

    And books, well I just don't know which ones I need :( I'm trying to learn the theory, but I always feel like there's something essential I forgot to learn which prevents it all from coming together in my head.

    On a brighter note: my current music teacher polled us last year to see if we were interested in taking private lessons from him if we wanted. (it's still through the music shop he's 'working for', but its one on one). I'll be paying a heck more, but its per lesson (I can just bring money for one hour and have him teach me something). I'll see how that goes.
     
  5. dhadleyray

    dhadleyray Guest

    Dec 7, 2004
    I have a friend that teaches in Belgium at a conservatory. He went through the 10 year program and I've spent time with his fellow teachers doing gigs and festivals.
    I would do the 10 year program... It's a complete and total education in music, plus you can teach. All of those guys have nice lifestyles and are respected. I really can't say enough about the encouragement and help musicians get in Europe (except England...very UNsupportive of musical aspirations. A quote EVERY English Musician will hear, "it's not a proper job.") Do the longer program "IF" you can.

    Here's a little saying I have...

    There are Bass players, and there are Bass owners. Bass owners outnumber Bass players 40 to 1... :rolleyes:
     
  6. Bassist4Life

    Bassist4Life

    Dec 17, 2004
    Buffalo, NY
    Your saying is similar in spirit to the quote I have from Mike Dimin. :)

    Joe
     
  7. Bassist4Life

    Bassist4Life

    Dec 17, 2004
    Buffalo, NY
    All theory books are going to cover the same basic material. Just make sure you get a beginner book. Here's one that I found on Amazon:

    http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1890944920/102-6844146-8380926?v=glance

    It doesn't have to be "for bass". Music theory if for ALL instruments. You can apply what you learn to the bass.

    Good Luck,
    Joe