Let It Be

Discussion in 'Recordings [BG]' started by JWC, Mar 8, 2001.

  1. JWC

    JWC Banned

    Oct 4, 2000
    Being a huge fan of the later works of The Beatles (Abbey Rd., Sgt. Pepper, White Album, Revolver, Magical Mystery Tour, etc.) I gave Let It Be a listen the other day and was really let down. Those songs are so half assed and lame. What's the deal with that album. I mean, the title track and a few other songs are cool, but the bulk of the album is crud.
  2. cole


    Sep 14, 2000
    well, for one thing, George Martin didn't produce it. (mistake #1)

    also, they tried to film the making of the album, but it ended up as mainly a string of arguments. (mistake #2)

    anyway, yeah, the album generally sucks. I like "Two of Us", "Let it Be", and "Get Back" (though the single versions of the latter two are much better, IMO), but the rest is just... why?
  3. JimK


    Dec 12, 1999
    By that time(the very end of The Beatles), George Martin was usurped by Yoko as the 5th Beatle.
    It's the "Yoko-influence"! ;)

    Also, though the songs credit Lennon/McCartney as "composers", they were writing apart from each other. So much turmoil within finally manifested itself in some slack tunes/arrangements. Compare McCartney's "The Long & Winding Road" on the 3rd Anthology disc to Spector's version of the same on Let It Be.
  4. 5156246


    Sep 6, 2000
    Just as a notice: The Let it be album was released after Magical Mistery Tour but it was recorded BEFORE!

    Some interest conflicts and the fact that most songs were not at all ready.
    Martin composed several arrangements for songs like "Let it be". McCartney's original idea was just a simple version of it similar to "Yesterday" and he did not like the new one with the orchestra in the background at all.
  5. Actually, your getting Magical Mystery Tour mixed up with Abbey Road. Magical Mystery Tour was recorder a couple years earlier.

    Let It Be was recorded during January of 1969. The original idea behind it was that they were going to film the band as they rehearsed and put new songs together to be recorded. They wanted to actually record this album live. The original title for the album and film was Get Back, as in getting back to their roots.

    What The Beatles found out was that they became very guarded about what was said because everything was being filmed and recorded. The band was also starting to fracture. Paul McCartney was trying to get everyone inspired, while the rest of the band took it as a power play. After awhile, disagreements came up and, at one point, George Harrison actually quite the band. Instead of having a film and album of the band getting it together, they ended up making a film and album of a band breaking up. In the end, they decided to can the whole project. It was later that they decided to resurrect it and see what Phil Spector could do with the recordings.

    It's interesting that they would be able to get it back together to do Abbey Road, which I think is one of their best and most together albums. In reading some of the interviews since, it was generally accepted that Abbey Road would be their farewell album, although it's not totally clear whether that was true. Because of that, they say they were able to put a lot of the bickering aside.

    One of the things you want to keep in mind when you listen to Let It Be is they wanted it to sound as 'live' as possible and rough around the edges- similar to their first couple albums. I do think there is some strong material on Let It Be but I generally agree that it's not up to snuff with the other albums they did around that time.

    You may also want to get a copy of the Let It Be video. That would shed some light on the situation. :)
  6. 5156246


    Sep 6, 2000
    Bassin' you're absolutely right, I mixed them up.
  7. yawnsie


    Apr 11, 2000
    I'd agree with Bassin' - Let It Be is a great document of a band on it's last legs. McCartney is basically trying to run the show, which Lennon and Harrison weren't too happy about - Lennon, in particular, only seems happy when he's with Yoko. There's also a part where McCartney and Harrison are arguing bitterly over a guitar part in I've Got A Feeling.

    After the band had split up, Lennon described what the Let It Be sessions were like - "It was terrible. No Beatle fan in the world could have put up with those six weeks of misery." Harrison stormed out of the band, for about a week, when he discovered that Yoko had eaten one of his chocolate biscuits without asking (really!), and the whole argument about Allan Klein managing the group was at it's peak then.

    The original concept behind the album was to make it as raw as possible - there would be no overdubbing, and the album would be recorded live with just drums, bass, and two guitars - just like the old days. However, the Beatles hadn't played together much since 1966, when the advance of multitracking recording equipment and the decision to stop touring combined. They were out of practice, and this, combined with the obvious antagonism, lead to the lacklusture performances you hear on the album. They even brought in keyboard player Billy Preston, to add to the four-piece sound, and to brighten the atmosphere a little.

    George Martin was the album's first producer. The sessions were abanoned with George and the band on less than good terms. While they eventually reconvened in the summer to record their swansong Abbey Road, Glyn Johns, then Martin's assistant, attempted to make a listenable album out of the tapes the group had left. This was turned down, and the project left untouched, until 1970, when the film Let It Be was due to be released, and a soundtrack was required.

    With action needing to be taken, John Lennon asked Phil Spector to attempt to salvage something and make an album out of it. Spector used his normal technique of overdubbing choirs, orchestras, sleigh bells, and anything else he could get his hands on, onto most of the album, leading to a very different sound to the one George Martin had so painstakingly etched for the band.

    One of the songs that recieved the Spector treatment was The Long And Winding Road. Originally just a demo with McCartney on piano, and Lennon on bass, Spector overdubbed the song to death behind McCartney's back. Listen to Lennon's bass playing on the song - there are many glaring errors and mistakes (damn guitarists ;)) which are uncorrected. When McCartney heard what Spector had done to his song, he understandably went mad, and promptly announced he had left the band. That, my friend, was the end of the Beatles.

    I hope that was informative to you JWC, or anyone else for that matter - that took me ages to type!
  8. the Qintar

    the Qintar

    Jul 24, 2000
    i was hoping this was a thread on the replacements album let it be, i sure was disapointed
  9. Yoko + The Beatles = let it be

    The beatles + Yoko = The End

  10. well put
  11. bassmonkeee

    bassmonkeee Supporting Member

    Sep 13, 2000
    Decatur, GA

  12. Do yourself a favor and throw Let It Be away, then go get Let It Be...Naked, it's barebones and they sounds awesome on it. It's completely un-produced, just like it was supossed to be. It is without a doubt my favorite Beatles Album.

    Thanks Yawnsie and Bassin' for doing all the typing I was about to do, you really saved me some time :bassist:

    MAJOR METAL HARVESTER OF SORROW Staff Member Supporting Member

    I actually had the band at Church play this song.
  14. It may not be as good as sum of da other albums, but i still think its a damn good album, 'I Me Mine' by G. HArrison is kick-ass!
  15. Yea actually, dat was da one i was talking bout, its all good!
  16. bassmonkeee

    bassmonkeee Supporting Member

    Sep 13, 2000
    Decatur, GA
    James--do you have a cold, or something? You seem to be having trouble with 'th.'

    Personally, I prefer Let it Be...Naked to the original. "Long and Winding Road" comes off a lot better without the Wall of Sound. And, I think the whole thing sounds tighter.

    The original always sounded rushed and unfinished, to me. But, the songs are still great.
  17. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    You ressurrected a 5 year-old-thread, just to say that!! :confused:

    And didn't even mention that it contains two of the most notorious TB Trolls ever - two for the price of one!! ;)
  18. JimK


    Dec 12, 1999


    'Let it be...'

    Whatever happened to that Winter 2005 issue of the Let It Be DVD?
  19. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    As they would say "oop North"...

    Let it lie....;)
  20. zack01


    Aug 3, 2002
    There is something with Let it Be that i love....and there are a lot of songs that Both Paul and John sings on...

    Two of Us, Dig A Pony,I´ve got a feeling and One after 909...When Paul and John sings togheter...the songs are great....

    I love Ive got a Feeling...what a great vocal skills by Paul and John.

    If we one day are lucky enough to see the Movie Let it Be we reallly gonne say that Paul can play some bass.....

    Let it be Naked...is a great album...it was mostly a Paul thing....and he have turned up the volume on the bass parts....