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Lion's head revisited

Discussion in 'Basses [DB]' started by Jeff Bollbach, Dec 16, 2002.


  1. Jeff Bollbach

    Jeff Bollbach Jeff Bollbach Luthier, Inc.

    Dec 12, 2001
    freeport, ny
    A few more pics-
     
  2. Jeff Bollbach

    Jeff Bollbach Jeff Bollbach Luthier, Inc.

    Dec 12, 2001
    freeport, ny
    another
     
  3. Jeff Bollbach

    Jeff Bollbach Jeff Bollbach Luthier, Inc.

    Dec 12, 2001
    freeport, ny
    and

    a one piece back. Very unusual, but structurally mebbe not a good choice. Some huge cracks on this one-methinks related to the "oneness" of the back.
     
  4. Jeff Bollbach

    Jeff Bollbach Jeff Bollbach Luthier, Inc.

    Dec 12, 2001
    freeport, ny
    almost finished for the nite-

    Ray'll find this interesting.
     
  5. Jeff Bollbach

    Jeff Bollbach Jeff Bollbach Luthier, Inc.

    Dec 12, 2001
    freeport, ny
    Interesting how Fausto actually fit the plates to the mane.
     
  6. Jeff Bollbach

    Jeff Bollbach Jeff Bollbach Luthier, Inc.

    Dec 12, 2001
    freeport, ny
    Fausto Casalini 1908-1938

    Do the math.
     
  7. sean p

    sean p

    Mar 7, 2002
    eugene, oregon
    wow. that's an argument for trade-oriented secondary education. i bet he couldn't quote shakespeare or do calculus, though. :D thanks for the pics, jeff.

    how's it sound?

    sean p
     
  8. Jeff Bollbach

    Jeff Bollbach Jeff Bollbach Luthier, Inc.

    Dec 12, 2001
    freeport, ny
    Ed- the bass was in for some set up work and a french polish.
    Sean-Yes, I bet he couldn't do calculus or quote the Bard-but then again neither can I and I never made a bass untill I was 41. Actually, I prolly could still do a little calc but "to be or not to be" is my complete repertoire on the latter.

    The bass does sound great.
     
  9. tsolo

    tsolo

    Aug 24, 2002
    Ft. Worth
    Raw talent or hard work?
     
  10. Jeff Bollbach

    Jeff Bollbach Jeff Bollbach Luthier, Inc.

    Dec 12, 2001
    freeport, ny
    no child labor laws!

    plus the above, of course.
     
  11. Oh,
    such a utterly charming bass !

    Oh lord but why ruin it with a French Polish ?
    That high gloss kills it...

    CV
    btw,
    Merry X-mas and a Happy new year :))
     
  12. Jeff Bollbach

    Jeff Bollbach Jeff Bollbach Luthier, Inc.

    Dec 12, 2001
    freeport, ny
    OK, I'll bite. How would you do it?

    BTW the polish was at the customers request and subsequent delight. and I did not add anything to the original varnish, I merely melted away the surface abrasions with alcohol and many pounds of elbow grease.
     
  13. anonymous0726

    anonymous0726 Guest

    Nov 4, 2001
    :)

    That look slike one mean bass to get your arms around. Is it a big'un or a little'un? I though mine had some unforgiving shoulders.
     
  14. Alex Scott

    Alex Scott

    May 8, 2002
    Austin, TX
    no more tv for me, wow
     
  15. Jeff Bollbach

    Jeff Bollbach Jeff Bollbach Luthier, Inc.

    Dec 12, 2001
    freeport, ny

    Medium'un. It's not too bad to play-the shoulders are a bit round but the whole upper section is on the smallish side and I set the neck out to a good playable height.
     
  16. Glad to hear the customer was happy and that the high gloss was according to his preferences.

    Imo, a high gloss polishing by adding shellac
    to the original varnish thrue French Polishing might not be the outmost cure.

    It seems the general attitude towards renovation has changed. Thrue more delicate methods the originality of the instrument remains. This meens
    an instrument of a 100 years is "allowed" to look
    old (read original).

    Although the slab players sometimes are looked upon as slightly less knowledgable, regarding this matter they are ahead of the upright comunity.

    If someone has tamperd with the original varnish on let´s say a 1962 dual concentric jazz bass, the value goes down many thousands of dollars.

    There is of course always the difficulty to know what should be done because of the instrumnets repairstatus, but I believe in a near future
    basses will recieve the same care as today violins and cellos.

    I would like to quote Mr Michael Darnton
    regarding this matter :

    """I think the polite way to say it is that (looking at the progress that's happened in the last 20 years or so in the restoration field) once a lot of violins got a heavy coat of french polish, then people decided it wasn't such a good idea, and the coat got lighter and lighter, and now the most conservative shops (including those in Chicago) believe that it's essentially undesirable, and do as little as possible.""" End of quote.

    Best
    CV
     
  17. anonymous0726

    anonymous0726 Guest

    Nov 4, 2001
    I believe Bob said that he rubbed it out, not adding or (really) taking away any finish.

    Collectors get some funny ideas about instruments. Not that I endorse screwing around with refinishing Strads or anything. What is important to a player and a collector are usually different things. Ultimately, the players get priced out as collectors skew the market.
     
  18. No, not me - it was Jeff.
     
  19. anonymous0726

    anonymous0726 Guest

    Nov 4, 2001
    Right you are. Sorry about that.
     
  20. French Polish is sort of "rubbing it out". You rub shellac on top of a surface.In this case the original varnish. French Polish is actually a method of adding shellac. You can also
    use a brush then you are painting not FP...;-)

    Strads have been French Polished but no one would today even think about it...thoose days are long gone :)

    Musicians who learn more about
    theire instruments tend to respect the orginality
    and intentions of the builder especially when the instrument is a vintage Italian.
    Today museums are cleaning away layers of thick
    varnish on paintings added by experts from the past, the violinshops have also become much more careful not to ruin anything further.

    CV