Little finger question

Discussion in 'Technique [BG]' started by Vorago, Jul 31, 2005.

  1. Vorago

    Vorago (((o)))

    Jul 17, 2003
    Antwerp, Belgium
    Alright, here's the deal, I tend to use my little finger as a support of my right (slap) hand when slapping. I'd like to know if this way of playing will hinder me in the future and prevent me from advancing. The reason why I'm asking, is because right now I feel like it's still easy to change my technique, and that in 2 or 3 years this might be whole lot more difficult. I already had to change the position of my fretting hand half a year ago, and it wasn't very easy so better now than later :)

    Here are two pictures to illustrate my question:

    With little finger supporting, current situation

    better way of playing?

  2. Vorago

    Vorago (((o)))

    Jul 17, 2003
    Antwerp, Belgium
  3. christoph h.

    christoph h.

    Mar 26, 2001
    i have read somewhere that Alain Caron does that. But I have some videos of him and it doesn't seem as obvious as your photo is showing.

    also, for what it's worth, i did that, too, but changed two years or so ago. but actually i can't imagine a lot of disadvantages caused by that technique. perhaps if you're into double-thumbing and make the motion from the elbow.
  4. el_Kabong


    Jul 11, 2005
    Because you've got to get your hand into a 'set' postion it may make life a little more difficult if you're rapidly swapping between slap and fingers. I'd guess it would also feel somewhat uncomfortable on some figures, eg if you were trying to slap a triplet on the E string with thumb, index then middle (but that's my hands not yours). I say if you're not getting a payoff by adopting the technique then ditch it because it's probably going to cost you somewhere.
  5. The only thing I can think of that might be affected is your ability to change strings quickly (jumping from say...D to E) with you thumb. But then again, practice a little like that and see if you can move comfortably. Try different styles until you get something that works good all over the bass.